12 CFR 567.1 - Definitions.

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§ 567.1 Definitions.
For the purposes of this subpart:
Adjusted total assets. The term adjusted total assets means:
(1) A savings association's total assets as that term is defined in this section;
(2) Plus
(i) The prorated assets of any includable subsidiary in which the savings association has a minority ownership interest that is not consolidated under generally accepted accounting principles; and
(ii) The remaining goodwill (FSLIC Capital Contributions) resulting from prior regulatory accounting practices as provided in the definition of qualifying supervisory goodwill in this section;
(3) Minus
(i) Assets not included in the applicable capital standard except for those subject to paragraphs (3)(ii) and (3)(iii) of this definition;
(ii) Investments in any includable subsidiary in which a savings association has a minority interest;
(iii) Investments in any subsidiary subject to consolidation under paragraph (2)(ii) of this definition; and
(iv) For purposes of determining core capital, qualifying supervisory goodwill.
Asset-backed commercial paper program. The term asset-backed commercial paper program (ABCP program) means a program that primarily issues commercial paper that has received a credit rating from an NRSRO and that is backed by assets or other exposures held in a bankruptcy-remote special purpose entity. The term sponsor of an ABCP program means a savings association that:
(1) Establishes an ABCP program;
(2) Approves the sellers permitted to participate in an ABCP program;
(3) Approves the asset pools to be purchased by an ABCP program; or
(4) Administers the ABCP program by monitoring the assets, arranging for debt placement, compiling monthly reports, or ensuring compliance with the program documents and with the program's credit and investment policy.
Cash items in the process of collection. The term cash items in the process of collection means checks or drafts in the process of collection that are drawn on another depository institution, including a central bank, and that are payable immediately upon presentation; U.S. Government checks that are drawn on the United States Treasury or any other U.S. Government or Government-sponsored agency and that are payable immediately upon presentation; broker's security drafts and commodity or bill-of-lading drafts payable immediately upon presentation; and unposted debits.
Commitment. The term commitment means any arrangement that obligates a savings association to:
(1) Purchase loans or securities;
(2) Extend credit in the form of loans or leases, participations in loans or leases, overdraft facilities, revolving credit facilities, home equity lines of credit, eligible ABCP liquidity facilities, or similar transactions.
Common stockholders' equity. The term common stockholders' equity means common stock, common stock surplus, retained earnings, and adjustments for the cumulative effect of foreign currency translation, less net unrealized losses on available-for-sale equity securities with readily determinable fair values.
Conditional guarantee. The term conditional guarantee means a contingent obligation of the United States Government or its agencies, the validity of which to the beneficiary is dependent upon some affirmative action—e.g., servicing requirements—on the part of the beneficiary of the guarantee or a third party.
Credit derivative. The term credit derivative means a contract that allows one party (the protection purchaser) to transfer the credit risk of an asset or off-balance sheet credit exposure to another party (the protection provider). The value of a credit derivative is dependent, at least in part, on the credit performance of a “referenced asset.”
Credit-enhancing interest-only strip. (1) The term credit-enhancing interest-only strip means an on-balance sheet asset that, in form or in substance:
(i) Represents the contractual right to receive some or all of the interest due on transferred assets; and
(ii) Exposes the savings association to credit risk directly or indirectly associated with the transferred assets that exceeds its pro rata share of the savings association's claim on the assets whether through subordination provisions or other credit enhancement techniques.
(2) OTS reserves the right to identify other cash flows or related interests as a credit-enhancing interest-only strip. In determining whether a particular interest cash flow functions as a credit-enhancing interest-only strip, OTS will consider the economic substance of the transaction.
Credit-enhancing representations and warranties. (1) The term credit-enhancing representations and warranties means representations and warranties that are made or assumed in connection with a transfer of assets (including loan servicing assets) and that obligate a savings association to protect investors from losses arising from credit risk in the assets transferred or loans serviced.
(2) Credit-enhancing representations and warranties include promises to protect a party from losses resulting from the default or nonperformance of another party or from an insufficiency in the value of the collateral.
(3) Credit-enhancing representations and warranties do not include:
(i) Early-default clauses and similar warranties that permit the return of, or premium refund clauses covering, qualifying mortgage loans for a period not to exceed 120 days from the date of transfer. These warranties may cover only those loans that were originated within one year of the date of the transfer;
(ii) Premium refund clauses covering assets guaranteed, in whole or in part, by the United States government, a United States government agency, or a United States government-sponsored enterprise, provided the premium refund clause is for a period not to exceed 120 days from the date of transfer; or
(iii) Warranties that permit the return of assets in instances of fraud, misrepresentation or incomplete documentation.
Depository institution. The term domestic depository institution means a financial institution that engages in the business of banking; that is recognized as a bank by the bank supervisory or monetary authorities of the country of its incorporation and the country of its principal banking operations; that receives deposits to a substantial extent in the regular course of business; and that has the power to accept demand deposits. In the United States, this definition encompasses all federally insured offices of commercial banks, mutual and stock savings banks, savings or building and loan associations (stock and mutual), cooperative banks, credit unions, and international banking facilities of domestic depository institutions. Bank holding companies and savings and loan holding companies are excluded from this definition. For the purposes of assigning risk weights, the differentiation between OECD depository institutions and non-OECD depository institutions is based on the country of incorporation. Claims on branches and agencies of foreign banks located in the United States are to be categorized on the basis of the parent bank's country of incorporation.
Direct credit substitute. The term direct credit substitute means an arrangement in which a savings association assumes, in form or in substance, credit risk associated with an on-or off-balance sheet asset or exposure that was not previously owned by the savings association (third-party asset) and the risk assumed by the savings association exceeds the pro rata share of the savings association's interest in the third-party asset. If a savings association has no claim on the third-party asset, then the savings association's assumption of any credit risk is a direct credit substitute. Direct credit substitutes include:
(1) Financial standby letters of credit that support financial claims on a third party that exceed a savings association's pro rata share in the financial claim;
(2) Guarantees, surety arrangements, credit derivatives, and similar instruments backing financial claims that exceed a savings association's pro rata share in the financial claim;
(3) Purchased subordinated interests that absorb more than their pro rata share of losses from the underlying assets;
(4) Credit derivative contracts under which the savings association assumes more than its pro rata share of credit risk on a third-party asset or exposure;
(5) Loans or lines of credit that provide credit enhancement for the financial obligations of a third party;
(6) Purchased loan servicing assets if the servicer is responsible for credit losses or if the servicer makes or assumes credit-enhancing representations and warranties with respect to the loans serviced. Servicer cash advances as defined in this section are not direct credit substitutes;
(7) Clean-up calls on third party assets. However, clean-up calls that are 10 percent or less of the original pool balance and that are exercisable at the option of the savings association are not direct credit substitutes; and
(8) Liquidity facilities that provide support to asset-backed commercial paper (other than eligible ABCP liquidity facilities).
Eligible ABCP liquidity facility. The term eligible ABCP liquidity facility means a liquidity facility that supports asset-backed commercial paper, in form or in substance, and that meets the following criteria:
(1)
(i) At the time of the draw, the liquidity facility must be subject to an asset quality test that precludes funding against assets that are 90 days or more past due or in default; and
(ii) If the assets that the liquidity facility is required to fund against are assets or exposures that have received a credit rating by a NRSRO at the time the inception of the facility, the facility can be used to fund only those assets or exposures that are rated investment grade by an NRSRO at the time of funding; or
(2) If the assets that are funded under the liquidity facility do not meet the criteria described in paragraph (1) of this definition, the assets must be guaranteed, conditionally or unconditionally, by the United States Government, its agencies, or the central government of an OECD country.
Eligible savings association. (1) The term eligible savings association means a savings association with respect to which the Director of the Office of Thrift Supervision has determined, on the basis of information available at the time, that:
(i) The savings association's management appears to be competent;
(ii) The savings association, as certified by its Board of Directors, is in substantial compliance with all applicable statutes, regulations, orders and written agreements and directives; and
(iii) The savings association's management, as certified by its Board of Directors, has not engaged in insider dealing, speculative practices, or any other activities that have or may jeopardize the association's safety and soundness or contributed to impairing the association's capital.
(2) Savings associations, for purposes of this paragraph, will be deemed to be eligible unless the Director makes a determination otherwise or notifies the savings association of its intent to conduct either an informal or formal examination to determine eligibility and provides written notification thereof to the savings association.
Equity investments. (1) The term equity investments includes investments in equity securities and real property that would be considered an equity investment under generally accepted accounting principles.
(2)
(i) The term equity securities means any:
(A) Stock, certificate of interest of participation in any profit-sharing agreement, collateral trust certificate or subscription, preorganization certificate or subscription, transferable share, investment contract, or voting trust certificate; or
(B) In general, any interest or instrument commonly known as an equity security; or
(C) Loans having profit sharing features which generally accepted accounting principles would reclassify as equity securities; or
(D) Any security immediately convertible at the option of the holder without payment of substantial additional consideration into such a security; or
(E) Any security carrying any warrant or right to subscribe to or purchase such a security; or
(F) Any certificate of interest or participation in, temporary or Interim certificate for, or receipt for any of the foregoing or any partnership interest; or
(G) Investments in equity securities and loans or advances to and guarantees issued on behalf of partnerships or joint ventures in which a savings association holds an interest in real property under generally accepted accounting principles.
(ii) The term equity securities does not include investments in a subsidiary as that term is defined in this section, equity investments that are permissible for national banks, ownership interests in pools of assets that are risk-weighted in accordance with § 567.6(a)(1)(vi) of this part, or the stock of Federal Home Loan Banks or Federal Reserve Banks.
(3) For purposes of this part, the term equity investments in real property does not include interests in real property that are primarily used or intended to be used by the savings association, its subsidiaries, or its affiliates as offices or related facilities for the conduct of its business.
(4) In addition, for purposes of this part, the term equity investments in real property does not include interests in real property that are acquired in satisfaction of a debt previously contracted in good faith or acquired in sales under judgments, decrees, or mortgages held by the savings association, provided that the property is not intended to be held for real estate investment purposes but is expected to be disposed of within five years or a longer period approved by the Office.
Exchange rate contracts. The term exchange rate contracts includes cross-currency interest rate swaps; forward foreign exchange rate contracts; currency options purchased; and any similar instrument that, in the opinion of the Office, may give rise to similar risks.
Face amount. The term face amount means the notational principal, or face value, amount of an off-balance sheet item or the amortized cost of an on-balance sheet asset.
Financial asset. The term financial asset means cash or other monetary instrument, evidence of debt, evidence of an ownership interest in an entity, or a contract that conveys a right to receive or exchange cash or another financial instrument from another party.
Financial standby letter of credit. The term financial standby letter of credit means a letter of credit or similar arrangement that represents an irrevocable obligation to a third-party beneficiary:
(1) To repay money borrowed by, or advanced to, or for the account of, a second party (the account party); or
(2) To make payment on behalf of the account party, in the event that the account party fails to fulfill its obligation to the beneficiary.
Includable subsidiary. The term includable subsidiary means a subsidiary of a savings association that is:
(1) Engaged solely in activities not impermissible for a national bank;
(2) Engaged in activities not permissible for a national bank, but only if acting solely as agent for its customers and such agency position is clearly documented in the savings association's files;
(3) Engaged solely in mortgage-banking activities;
(4)
(i) Itself an insured depository institution or a company the sole investment of which is an insured depository institution, and
(ii) Was acquired by the parent savings association prior to May 1, 1989; or
(5) A subsidiary of any Federal savings association existing as a Federal savings association on August 9, 1989 that
(i) Was chartered prior to October 15, 1982, as a savings bank or a cooperative bank under State law, or
(ii) Acquired its principal assets from an association that was chartered prior to October 15, 1982, as a savings bank or a cooperative bank under State law.
Intangible assets. The term intangible assets means assets considered to be intangible assets under generally accepted accounting principles. These assets include, but are not limited to, goodwill, core deposit premiums, purchased credit card relationships, favorable leaseholds, and servicing assets (mortgage and non-mortgage). Interest-only strips receivable and other nonsecurity financial instruments are not intangible assets under this definition.
Interest-rate contracts. The term interest-rate contracts includes single currency interest-rate swaps; basis swaps; forward rate agreements; interest-rate options purchased; forward forward deposits accepted; and any other instrument that, in the opinion of the Office, may give rise to similar risks, including when-issued securities.
Liquidity facility. The term liquidity facility means a legally binding commitment to provide liquidity support to asset-backed commercial paper by lending to, or purchasing assets from any structure, program or conduit in the event that funds are required to repay maturing asset-backed commercial paper.
Mortgage-related securities. The term mortgage-related securities means any mortgage-related qualifying securities under section 3(a)(41) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, 15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(41), Provided, That the rating requirements of that section shall not be considered for purposes of this definition.
Nationally recognized statistical rating organization (NRSRO). The term nationally recognized statistical rating organization means an entity recognized by the Division of Market Regulation of the Securities and Exchange Commission (Commission) as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization for various purposes, including the Commission's uniform net capital requirements for brokers and dealers.
OECD-based country. The term OECD-based country means a member of that grouping of countries that are full members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) plus countries that have concluded special lending arrangements with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) associated with the IMF's General Arrangements to Borrow. This term excludes any country that has rescheduled its external sovereign debt within the previous five years. A rescheduling of external sovereign debt generally would include any renegotiation of terms arising from a country's inability or unwillingness to meet its external debt service obligations, but generally would not include renegotiations of debt in the normal course of business, such as a renegotiation to allow the borrower to take advantage of a decline in interest rates or other change in market conditions.
Original maturity. The term original maturity means, with respect to a commitment, the earliest date after a commitment is made on which the commitment is scheduled to expire (i.e., it will reach its stated maturity and cease to be binding on either party), Provided, That either:
(i) The commitment is not subject to extension or renewal and will actually expire on its stated expiration date; or
(ii) If the commitment is subject to extension or renewal beyond its stated expiration date, the stated expiration date will be deemed the original maturity only if the extension or renewal must be based upon terms and conditions independently negotiated in good faith with the customer at the time of the extension or renewal and upon a new, bona fide credit analysis utilizing current information on financial condition and trends.
Performance-based standby letter of credit. The term performance-based standby letter of credit means any letter of credit, or similar arrangement, however named or described, which represents an irrevocable obligation to the beneficiary on the part of the issuer to make payment on account of any default by a third party in the performance of a nonfinancial or commercial obligation. Such letters of credit include arrangements backing subcontractors' and suppliers' performance, labor and materials contracts, and construction bids.
Perpetual preferred stock. The term perpetual preferred stock means preferred stock without a fixed maturity date that cannot be redeemed at the option of the holder, and that has no other provisions that will require future redemption of the issue. For purposes of these instruments, preferred stock that can be redeemed at the option of the holder is deemed to have an “original maturity” of the earliest possible date on which it may be so redeemed. Cumulative perpetual preferred stock is preferred stock where the dividends accumulate from one period to the next. Noncumulative perpetual preferred stock is preferred stock where the unpaid dividends are not carried over to subsequent dividend periods.
Problem institution. The term problem institution means a savings association that, at the time of its acquisition, merger, purchase of assets or other business combination with or by another savings association:
(1) Was subject to special regulatory controls by its primary Federal or state regulatory authority;
(2) Posed particular supervisory concerns to its primary Federal or state regulatory authority; or
(3) Failed to meet its regulatory capital requirement immediately before the transaction.
Prorated assets. The term prorated assets means the total assets (as determined in the most recently available GAAP report but in no event more than one year old) of a subsidiary (including those subsidiaries where the savings association has a minority interest) multiplied by the savings association's percentage of ownership of that subsidiary.
Qualifying mortgage loan. (1) The term qualifying mortgage loan means a loan that:
(i) Is fully secured by a first lien on a one-to four-family residential property;
(ii) Is underwritten in accordance with prudent underwriting standards, including standards relating the ratio of the loan amount to the value of the property (LTV ratio). See Appendix to 12 CFR 560.101. A nonqualifying mortgage loan that is paid down to an appropriate LTV ratio (calculated using value at origination) may become a qualifying loan if it meets all other requirements of this definition;
(iii) Maintains an appropriate LTV ratio based on the amortized principal balance of the loan; and
(iv) Is performing and is not more than 90 days past due.
(2) If a savings association holds the first and junior lien(s) on a residential property and no other party holds an intervening lien, the transaction is treated as a single loan secured by a first lien for the purposes of determining the LTV ratio and the appropriate risk weight under § 567.6(a).
(3) A loan to an individual borrower for the construction of the borrower's home may be included as a qualifying mortgage loan.
(4) A loan that meets the requirements of this section prior to modification on a permanent or trial basis under the U.S. Department of Treasury's Home Affordable Mortgage Program may be included as a qualifying mortgage loan, so long as the loan is not 90 days or more past due.
Qualifying multifamily mortgage loan. (1) The term qualifying multifamily mortgage loan means a loan secured by a first lien on multifamily residential properties consisting of 5 or more dwelling units, provided that:
(i) The amortization of principal and interest occurs over a period of not more than 30 years;
(ii) The original minimum maturity for repayment of principal on the loan is not less than seven years;
(iii) When considering the loan for placement in a lower risk-weight category, all principal and interest payments have been made on a timely basis in accordance with its terms for the preceding year;
(iv) The loan is performing and not 90 days or more past due;
(v) The loan is made by the savings association in accordance with prudent underwriting standards; and
(vi) If the interest rate on the loan does not change over the term of the loan:
(A) The current loan balance amount does not exceed 80 percent of the value of the property securing the loan; and
(B) For the property's most recent fiscal year, the ratio of annual net operating income generated by the property (before payment of any debt service on the loan) to annual debt service on the loan is not less than 120 percent, or in the case of cooperative or other not-for-profit housing projects, the property generates sufficient cash flows to provide comparable protection to the institution; or
(vii) If the interest rate on the loan changes over the term of the loan:
(A) The current loan balance amount does not exceed 75 percent of the value of the property securing the loan; and
(B) For the property's most recent fiscal year, the ratio of annual net operating income generated by the property (before payment of any debt service on the loan) to annual debt service on the loan is not less than 115 percent, or in the case of cooperative or other not-for-profit housing projects, the property generates sufficient cash flows to provide comparable protection to the institution.
(2) The term qualifying multifamily mortgage loan also includes a multifamily mortgage loan that on March 18, 1994 was a first mortgage loan on an existing property consisting of 5-36 dwelling units with an initial loan-to-value ratio of not more than 80% where an average annual occupancy rate of 80% or more of total units had existed for at least one year, and continues to meet these criteria.
(3) For purposes of paragraphs (1) (vi) and (vii) of this definition, the term value of the property means, at origination of a loan to purchase a multifamily property: the lower of the purchase price or the amount of the initial appraisal, or if appropriate, the initial evaluation. In cases not involving the purchase of a multifamily loan, the value of the property is determined by the most current appraisal, or if appropriate, the most current evaluation.
(4) In cases where a borrower refinances a loan on an existing property, as an alternative to paragraphs (1) (iii), (vi), and (vii) of this definition:
(i) All principal and interest payments on the loan being refinanced have been made on a timely basis in accordance with the terms of that loan for the preceding year; and
(ii) The net income on the property for the preceding year would support timely principal and interest payments on the new loan in accordance with the applicable debt service requirement.
Qualifying residential construction loan. (1) The term qualifying residential construction loan, also referred to as a residential bridge loan, means a loan made in accordance with sound lending principles satisfying the following criteria:
(i) The builder must have substantial project equity in the home construction project;
(ii) The residence being constructed must be a 1-4 family residence sold to a home purchaser;
(iii) The lending savings association must obtain sufficient documentation from a permanent lender (which may be the construction lender) demonstrating that:
(A) The home buyer intends to purchase the residence; and
(B) Has the ability to obtain a permanent qualifying mortgage loan sufficient to purchase the residence;
(iv) The home purchaser must have made a substantial earnest money deposit;
(v) The construction loan must not exceed 80 percent of the sales price of the residence;
(vi) The construction loan must be secured by a first lien on the lot, residence under construction, and other improvements;
(vii) The lending thrift must retain sufficient undisbursed loan funds throughout the construction period to ensure project completion;
(viii) The builder must incur a significant percentage of direct costs (i.e., the actual costs of land, labor, and material) before any drawdown on the loan;
(ix) If at any time during the life of the construction loan any of the criteria of this rule are no longer satisfied, the association must immediately recategorize the loan at a 100 percent risk-weight and must accurately report the loan in the association's next quarterly Thrift Financial Report;
(x) The home purchaser must intend that the home will be owner-occupied;
(xi) The home purchaser(s) must be an individual(s), not a partnership, joint venture, trust corporation, or any other entity (including an entity acting as a sole proprietorship) that is purchasing the home(s) for speculative purposes; and
(xii) The loan must be performing and not more than 90 days past due.
(2) The documentation for each loan and home sale must be sufficient to demonstrate compliance with the criteria in paragraph (1) of this definition. The OTS retains the discretion to determine that any loans not meeting sound lending principles must be placed in a higher risk-weight category. The OTS also reserves the discretion to modify these criteria on a case-by-case basis provided that any such modifications are not inconsistent with the safety and soundness objectives of this definition.
Qualifying securities firm. The term qualifying securities firm means:
(1) A securities firm incorporated in the United States that is a broker-dealer that is registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and that complies with the SEC's net capital regulations (17 CFR 240.15c3(1)); and
(2) A securities firm incorporated in any other OECD-based country, if the savings association is able to demonstrate that the securities firm is subject to consolidated supervision and regulation (covering its subsidiaries, but not necessarily its parent organizations) comparable to that imposed on depository institutions in OECD countries. Such regulation must include risk-based capital requirements comparable to those imposed on depository institutions under the Accord on International Convergence of Capital Measurement and Capital Standards (1988, as amended in 1998).
Qualifying supervisory goodwill. The term qualifying supervisory goodwill means, for eligible savings associations:
(1) Any unamortized goodwill (FSLIC Capital Contributions, as reported in the September 30, 1989 Thrift Financial Report) that existed on April 12, 1989 resulting from prior regulatory accounting practices less any amortization that would have occurred subsequent to April 12, 1989 through the current reporting period where the amortization is calculated on a straight line basis over the shorter of 20 years, or the remaining period for amortization in effect on April 12, 1989 for regulatory accounting practices; plus
(2) The lesser of:
(i) Supervisory goodwill as defined in this section that is included in goodwill that is reflected in the current reporting period under generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”); or
(ii)
(A) Supervisory goodwill as defined in this section that is included in goodwill that is reflected in the current reporting period under GAAP;
(B) Plus any amortization of the goodwill in paragraph (2)(ii)(A) of this definition that occurred subsequent to April 12, 1989 for GAAP reporting purposes;
(C) Minus the amortization of the goodwill in paragraph (2)(ii)(A) of this definition through the current reporting period that results when the goodwill is amortized subsequent to April 12, 1989 on a straightline basis over the shorter of—
(1) 20 years; or
(2) The remaining period for amortization in effect on April 12, 1989 under regulatory accounting practices.
Reciprocal holdings of depository institution instruments. The term reciprocal holdings of depository institution instruments means cross-holdings or other formal or informal arrangements in which two or more depository institutions swap, exchange, or otherwise agree to hold each other's capital instruments. This definition does not include holdings of capital instruments issued by other depository institutions that were taken in satisfaction of debts previously contracted, provided that the reporting savings association has not held such instruments for more than five years or a longer period approved by the Office.
Recourse. The term recourse means a savings association's retention, in form or in substance, of any credit risk directly or indirectly associated with an asset it has sold (in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles) that exceeds a pro rata share of that savings association's claim on the asset. If a savings association has no claim on an asset it has sold, then the retention of any credit risk is recourse. A recourse obligation typically arises when a savings association transfers assets in a sale and retains an explicit obligation to repurchase assets or to absorb losses due to a default on the payment of principal or interest or any other deficiency in the performance of the underlying obligor or some other party. Recourse may also exist implicitly if a savings association provides credit enhancement beyond any contractual obligation to support assets it has sold. Recourse obligations include:
(1) Credit-enhancing representations and warranties made on transferred assets;
(2) Loan servicing assets retained pursuant to an agreement under which the savings association will be responsible for losses associated with the loans serviced. Servicer cash advances as defined in this section are not recourse obligations;
(3) Retained subordinated interests that absorb more than their pro rata share of losses from the underlying assets;
(4) Assets sold under an agreement to repurchase, if the assets are not already included on the balance sheet;
(5) Loan strips sold without contractual recourse where the maturity of the transferred portion of the loan is shorter than the maturity of the commitment under which the loan is drawn;
(6) Credit derivatives that absorb more than the savings association's pro rata share of losses from the transferred assets;
(7) Clean-up calls on assets the savings association has sold. However, clean-up calls that are 10 percent or less of the original pool balance and that are exercisable at the option of the savings association are not recourse arrangements; and
(8) Liquidity facilities that provide support to asset-backed commercial paper (other than eligible ABCP liquidity facilities).
Replacement cost. The term replacement cost means, with respect to interest rate and exchange-rate contracts, the loss that would be incurred in the event of a counterparty default, as measured by the net cost of replacing the contract at the current market value. If default would result in a theoretical profit, the replacement value is considered to be zero. This mark-to-market process must incorporate changes in both interest rates and counterparty credit quality.
Residential properties. The term residential properties means houses, condominiums, cooperative units, and manufactured homes. This definition does not include boats or motor homes, even if used as a primary residence, or timeshare properties.
Residual characteristics. The term residual characteristics means interests similar to a multi-class pay-through obligation representing the excess cash flow generated from mortgage collateral over the amount required for the issue's debt service and ongoing administrative expenses or interests presenting similar degrees of interest-rate/prepayment risk and principal loss risks.
Residual interest. (1) The term residual interest means any on-balance sheet asset that:
(i) Represents an interest (including a beneficial interest) created by a transfer that qualifies as a sale (in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles) of financial assets, whether through a securitization or otherwise; and
(ii) Exposes a savings association to credit risk directly or indirectly associated with the transferred asset that exceeds a pro rata share of that savings association's claim on the asset, whether through subordination provisions or other credit enhancement techniques.
(2) Residual interests generally include credit-enhancing interest-only strips, spread accounts, cash collateral accounts, retained subordinated interests (and other forms of overcollateralization), and similar assets that function as a credit enhancement.
(3) Residual interests further include those exposures that, in substance, cause the savings association to retain the credit risk of an asset or exposure that had qualified as a residual interest before it was sold.
(4) Residual interests generally do not include assets purchased from a third party. However, a credit-enhancing interest-only strip that is acquired in any asset transfer is a residual interest.
Risk participation. The term risk participation means a participation in which the originating party remains liable to the beneficiary for the full amount of an obligation (e.g., a direct credit substitute), notwithstanding that another party has acquired a participation in that obligation.
Risk-weighted assets. The term risk-weighted assets means the sum total of risk-weighted on-balance sheet assets and the total of risk-weighted off-balance sheet credit equivalent amounts. These assets are calculated in accordance with § 567.6 of this part.
Securitization. The term securitization means the pooling and repackaging by a special purpose entity of assets or other credit exposures that can be sold to investors. Securitization includes transactions that create stratified credit risk positions whose performance is dependent upon an underlying pool of credit exposures, including loans and commitments.
Servicer cash advance. The term servicer cash advance means funds that a residential mortgage servicer advances to ensure an uninterrupted flow of payments, including advances made to cover foreclosure costs or other expenses to facilitate the timely collection of the loan. A servicer cash advance is not a recourse obligation or a direct credit substitute if:
(1) The servicer is entitled to full reimbursement and this right is not subordinated to other claims on the cash flows from the underlying asset pool; or
(2) For any one loan, the servicer's obligation to make nonreimbursable advances is contractually limited to an insignificant amount of the outstanding principal amount on that loan.
State. The term State means any one of the several states of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the territories and possessions of the United States.
Structured financing program. The term structured financing program means a program where receivable interests and asset-or mortgage-backed securities issued by multiple participants are purchased by a special purpose entity that repackages those exposures into securities that can be sold to investors. Structured financing programs allocate credit risk, generally, between the participants and credit enhancement provided to the program.
Subsidiary. The term subsidiary means any corporation, partnership, business trust, joint venture, association or similar organization in which a savings association directly or indirectly holds an ownership interest and the assets of which are consolidated with those of the savings association for purposes of reporting under Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Generally, these are majority-owned subsidiaries. 1 This definition does not include ownership interests that were taken in satisfaction of debts previously contracted, provided that the reporting association has not held the interest for more than five years or a longer period approved by the OTS.

Footnote(s):
1 The OTS reserves the right to review a savings association's investment in a subsidiary on a case-by-case basis. If the OTS determines that such investment is more appropriately treated as an equity security or an ownership interest in a subsidiary, it will make such determination regardless of the percentage of ownership held by the savings association.

Supervisory goodwill. The term supervisory goodwill means goodwill 2 resulting from the acquisition, merger, consolidation, purchase of assets, or other business combination (if such transaction occurred on or before April 12, 1989) of

Footnote(s):
2 Goodwill that has been written off of an association's balance sheet for its GAAP financial statements or Thrift Financial Report cannot be counted as supervisory goodwill.

(1) A savings association where the fair market value of assets was less than the fair market value of liabilities at the acquisition date; or
(2) A problem institution.
Tier 1 capital. The term Tier 1 capital means core capital as computed in accordance with § 567.5(a) of this part.
Tier 2 capital. The term Tier 2 capital means supplementary capital as computed in accordance with § 567.5 of this part.
Total assets. The term total assets means total assets as would be required to be reported for consolidated entities on period-end reports filed with the Office in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.
Traded position. The term traded position means a position retained, assumed, or issued in connection with a securitization that is rated by a NRSRO, where there is a reasonable expectation that, in the near future, the rating will be relied upon by:
(1) Unaffiliated investors to purchase the security; or
(2) An unaffiliated third party to enter into a transaction involving the position, such as a purchase, loan, or repurchase agreement.
Unconditionally cancelable. The term unconditionally cancelable means, with respect to a commitment-type lending arrangement, that the savings association may, at any time, with or without cause, refuse to advance funds or extend credit under the facility. In the case of home equity lines of credit, the savings association is deemed able to unconditionally cancel the commitment if it can, at its option, prohibit additional extensions of credit, reduce the line, and terminate the commitment to the full extent permitted by relevant Federal law.
United States Government or its agencies. The term United States Government or its agencies means an instrumentality of the U.S. Government whose debt obligations are fully and explicitly guaranteed as to the timely payment of principal and interest by the full faith and credit of the United States Government.
United States Government-sponsored agency or corporation. The term United States Government-sponsored agency or corporation means an agency or corporation originally established or chartered to serve public purposes specified by the United States Congress but whose obligations are not explicitly guaranteed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government.
[54 FR 49649, Nov. 30, 1989]
Editorial Note:
For Federal Register citations affecting § 567.1, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.fdsys.gov.

Title 12 published on 2014-01-01

no entries appear in the Federal Register after this date.

This is a list of United States Code sections, Statutes at Large, Public Laws, and Presidential Documents, which provide rulemaking authority for this CFR Part.

This list is taken from the Parallel Table of Authorities and Rules provided by GPO [Government Printing Office].

It is not guaranteed to be accurate or up-to-date, though we do refresh the database weekly. More limitations on accuracy are described at the GPO site.


United States Code