14 CFR 23.903 - Engines.

§ 23.903 Engines.
(a) Engine type certificate.
(1) Each engine must have a type certificate and must meet the applicable requirements of part 34 of this chapter.
(2) Each turbine engine and its installation must comply with one of the following:
(i) Sections 33.76, 33.77 and 33.78 of this chapter in effect on December 13, 2000, or as subsequently amended; or
(ii) Sections 33.77 and 33.78 of this chapter in effect on April 30, 1998, or as subsequently amended before December 13, 2000; or
(iii) Section 33.77 of this chapter in effect on October 31, 1974, or as subsequently amended before April 30, 1998, unless that engine's foreign object ingestion service history has resulted in an unsafe condition; or
(iv) Be shown to have a foreign object ingestion service history in similar installation locations which has not resulted in any unsafe condition.
Note:
§ 33.77 of this chapter in effect on October 31, 1974, was published in 14 CFR parts 1 to 59, Revised as of January 1, 1975. See 39 FR 35467, October 1, 1974.
(b) Turbine engine installations. For turbine engine installations—
(1) Design precautions must be taken to minimize the hazards to the airplane in the event of an engine rotor failure or of a fire originating inside the engine which burns through the engine case.
(2) The powerplant systems associated with engine control devices, systems, and instrumentation must be designed to give reasonable assurance that those operating limitations that adversely affect turbine rotor structural integrity will not be exceeded in service.
(3) For engines embedded in the fuselage behind the cabin, the effects of a fan exiting forward of the inlet case (fan disconnect) must be addressed, the passengers must be protected, and the airplane must be controllable to allow for continued safe flight and landing.
(c) Engine isolation. The powerplants must be arranged and isolated from each other to allow operation, in at least one configuration, so that the failure or malfunction of any engine, or the failure or malfunction (including destruction by fire in the engine compartment) of any system that can affect an engine (other than a fuel tank if only one fuel tank is installed), will not:
(1) Prevent the continued safe operation of the remaining engines; or
(2) Require immediate action by any crewmember for continued safe operation of the remaining engines.
(d) Starting and stopping (piston engine).
(1) The design of the installation must be such that risk of fire or mechanical damage to the engine or airplane, as a result of starting the engine in any conditions in which starting is to be permitted, is reduced to a minimum. Any techniques and associated limitations for engine starting must be established and included in the Airplane Flight Manual, approved manual material, or applicable operating placards. Means must be provided for—
(i) Restarting any engine of a multiengine airplane in flight, and
(ii) Stopping any engine in flight, after engine failure, if continued engine rotation would cause a hazard to the airplane.
(2) In addition, for commuter category airplanes, the following apply:
(i) Each component of the stopping system on the engine side of the firewall that might be exposed to fire must be at least fire resistant.
(ii) If hydraulic propeller feathering systems are used for this purpose, the feathering lines must be at least fire resistant under the operating conditions that may be expected to exist during feathering.
(e) Starting and stopping (turbine engine). Turbine engine installations must comply with the following:
(1) The design of the installation must be such that risk of fire or mechanical damage to the engine or the airplane, as a result of starting the engine in any conditions in which starting is to be permitted, is reduced to a minimum. Any techniques and associated limitations must be established and included in the Airplane Flight Manual, approved manual material, or applicable operating placards.
(2) There must be means for stopping combustion within any engine and for stopping the rotation of any engine if continued rotation would cause a hazard to the airplane. Each component of the engine stopping system located in any fire zone must be fire resistant. If hydraulic propeller feathering systems are used for stopping the engine, the hydraulic feathering lines or hoses must be fire resistant.
(3) It must be possible to restart an engine in flight. Any techniques and associated limitations must be established and included in the Airplane Flight Manual, approved manual material, or applicable operating placards.
(4) It must be demonstrated in flight that when restarting engines following a false start, all fuel or vapor is discharged in such a way that it does not constitute a fire hazard.
(f) Restart envelope. An altitude and airspeed envelope must be established for the airplane for in-flight engine restarting and each installed engine must have a restart capability within that envelope.
(g) Restart capability. For turbine engine powered airplanes, if the minimum windmilling speed of the engines, following the in-flight shutdown of all engines, is insufficient to provide the necessary electrical power for engine ignition, a power source independent of the engine-driven electrical power generating system must be provided to permit in-flight engine ignition for restarting.
[Amdt. 23-14, 38 FR 31822, Nov. 19, 1973]
Editorial Note:
For Federal Register citations affecting § 23.903, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.fdsys.gov.

Title 14 published on 2014-01-01

no entries appear in the Federal Register after this date.

This is a list of United States Code sections, Statutes at Large, Public Laws, and Presidential Documents, which provide rulemaking authority for this CFR Part.

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United States Code

Title 14 published on 2014-01-01

The following are ALL rules, proposed rules, and notices (chronologically) published in the Federal Register relating to 14 CFR 23 after this date.

  • 2014-03-18; vol. 79 # 52 - Tuesday, March 18, 2014
    1. 79 FR 15062 - Special Conditions: Extra Flugzeugproduktions and Vertriebs [Extra] GmbH, EA-300/LC; Acrobatic Category Aerodynamic Stability
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, Federal Aviation Administration
      Notice of proposed special conditions.
      Send your comments on or before April 17, 2014.
      14 CFR Part 23