14 CFR 25.795 - Security considerations.

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§ 25.795 Security considerations.
(a) Protection of flightcrew compartment. If a flightdeck door is required by operating rules:
(1) The bulkhead, door, and any other accessible boundary separating the flightcrew compartment from occupied areas must be designed to resist forcible intrusion by unauthorized persons and be capable of withstanding impacts of 300 joules (221.3 foot pounds).
(2) The bulkhead, door, and any other accessible boundary separating the flightcrew compartment from occupied areas must be designed to resist a constant 250 pound (1,113 Newtons) tensile load on accessible handholds, including the doorknob or handle.
(3) The bulkhead, door, and any other boundary separating the flightcrew compartment from any occupied areas must be designed to resist penetration by small arms fire and fragmentation devices to a level equivalent to level IIIa of the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Standard 0101.04.
(b) Airplanes with a maximum certificated passenger seating capacity of more than 60 persons or a maximum certificated takeoff gross weight of over 100,000 pounds (45,359 Kilograms) must be designed to limit the effects of an explosive or incendiary device as follows:
(1) Flightdeck smoke protection. Means must be provided to limit entry of smoke, fumes, and noxious gases into the flightdeck.
(2) Passenger cabin smoke protection. Means must be provided to prevent passenger incapacitation in the cabin resulting from smoke, fumes, and noxious gases as represented by the initial combined volumetric concentrations of 0.59% carbon monoxide and 1.23% carbon dioxide.
(3) Cargo compartment fire suppression. An extinguishing agent must be capable of suppressing a fire. All cargo-compartment fire suppression systems must be designed to withstand the following effects, including support structure displacements or adjacent materials displacing against the distribution system:
(i) Impact or damage from a 0.5-inch diameter aluminum sphere traveling at 430 feet per second (131.1 meters per second);
(ii) A 15-pound per square-inch (103.4 kPa) pressure load if the projected surface area of the component is greater than 4 square feet. Any single dimension greater than 4 feet (1.22 meters) may be assumed to be 4 feet (1.22 meters) in length; and
(iii) A 6-inch (0.152 meters) displacement, except where limited by the fuselage contour, from a single point force applied anywhere along the distribution system where relative movement between the system and its attachment can occur.
(iv) Paragraphs (b)(3)(i) through (iii) of this section do not apply to components that are redundant and separated in accordance with paragraph (c)(2) of this section or are installed remotely from the cargo compartment.
(c) An airplane with a maximum certificated passenger seating capacity of more than 60 persons or a maximum certificated takeoff gross weight of over 100,000 pounds (45,359 Kilograms) must comply with the following:
(1) Least risk bomb location. An airplane must be designed with a designated location where a bomb or other explosive device could be placed to best protect flight-critical structures and systems from damage in the case of detonation.
(2) Survivability of systems.
(i) Except where impracticable, redundant airplane systems necessary for continued safe flight and landing must be physically separated, at a minimum, by an amount equal to a sphere of diameter
(where H0 is defined under § 25.365(e)(2) of this part and D need not exceed 5.05 feet (1.54 meters)). The sphere is applied everywhere within the fuselage—limited by the forward bulkhead and the aft bulkhead of the passenger cabin and cargo compartment beyond which only one-half the sphere is applied.
(ii) Where compliance with paragraph (c)(2)(i) of this section is impracticable, other design precautions must be taken to maximize the survivability of those systems.
(3) Interior design to facilitate searches. Design features must be incorporated that will deter concealment or promote discovery of weapons, explosives, or other objects from a simple inspection in the following areas of the airplane cabin:
(i) Areas above the overhead bins must be designed to prevent objects from being hidden from view in a simple search from the aisle. Designs that prevent concealment of objects with volumes 20 cubic inches and greater satisfy this requirement.
(ii) Toilets must be designed to prevent the passage of solid objects greater than 2.0 inches in diameter.
(iii) Life preservers or their storage locations must be designed so that tampering is evident.
(d) Exceptions. Airplanes used solely to transport cargo only need to meet the requirements of paragraphs (b)(1), (b)(3), and (c)(2) of this section.
(e) Material Incorporated by Reference. You must use National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Standard 0101.04, Ballistic Resistance of Personal Body Armor, June 2001, Revision A, to establish ballistic resistance as required by paragraph (a)(3) of this section.
(1) The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of this document under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51.
(2) You may review copies of NIJ Standard 0101.04 at the:
(i) FAA Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue, SW., Renton, Washington 98055;
(ii) National Institute of Justice (NIJ), http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij, telephone (202) 307-2942; or
(iii) National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA go to http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html or call (202) 741-6030.
(3) You may obtain copies of NIJ Standard 0101.04 from the National Criminal Justice Reference Service, P.O. Box 6000, Rockville, MD 20849-6000, telephone (800) 851-3420.
[Amdt. Nos. 25-127; 121-341, 73 FR 63879, Oct. 28, 2008, as amended at 74 FR 22819, May 15, 2009]

Title 14 published on 2014-01-01

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  • 2014-09-12; vol. 79 # 177 - Friday, September 12, 2014
    1. 79 FR 54571 - Special Conditions: Bombardier Aerospace, Models BD-500-1A10 and BD-500-1A11 Series Airplanes; Automatic Speed Protection for Design Dive Speed
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, Federal Aviation Administration
      Final special conditions.
      Effective Date: October 14, 2014.
      14 CFR Part 25

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United States Code

Title 14 published on 2014-01-01

The following are ALL rules, proposed rules, and notices (chronologically) published in the Federal Register relating to 14 CFR 25 after this date.

  • 2014-09-12; vol. 79 # 177 - Friday, September 12, 2014
    1. 79 FR 54571 - Special Conditions: Bombardier Aerospace, Models BD-500-1A10 and BD-500-1A11 Series Airplanes; Automatic Speed Protection for Design Dive Speed
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, Federal Aviation Administration
      Final special conditions.
      Effective Date: October 14, 2014.
      14 CFR Part 25