14 CFR Part 141, Appendix M to Part 141 - Combined Private Pilot Certification and Instrument Rating Course

Status message

There are 2 Updates appearing in the Federal Register for 14 CFR 141. View below or at eCFR (GPOAccess)
prev | next
View PDF at GPO Pt. 141, App. M
Appendix M to Part 141—Combined Private Pilot Certification and Instrument Rating Course
1. Applicability. This appendix prescribes the minimum curriculum for a combined private pilot certification and instrument rating course required under this part, for the following ratings:
(a) Airplane.
(1) Airplane single-engine.
(2) Airplane multiengine.
(b) Rotorcraft helicopter.
(c) Powered-lift.
2. Eligibility for enrollment. A person must hold a sport pilot, recreational, or student pilot certificate prior to enrolling in the flight portion of a combined private pilot certification and instrument rating course.
3. Aeronautical knowledge training.
(a) Each approved course must include at least 65 hours of ground training on the aeronautical knowledge areas listed in paragraph (b) of this section that are appropriate to the aircraft category and class rating of the course:
(b) Ground training must include the following aeronautical knowledge areas:
(1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations for private pilot privileges, limitations, flight operations, and instrument flight rules (IFR) flight operations.
(2) Accident reporting requirements of the National Transportation Safety Board.
(3) Applicable subjects of the “Aeronautical Information Manual” and the appropriate FAA advisory circulars.
(4) Aeronautical charts for visual flight rules (VFR) navigation using pilotage, dead reckoning, and navigation systems.
(5) Radio communication procedures.
(6) Recognition of critical weather situations from the ground and in flight, windshear avoidance, and the procurement and use of aeronautical weather reports and forecasts.
(7) Safe and efficient operation of aircraft under instrument flight rules and conditions.
(8) Collision avoidance and recognition and avoidance of wake turbulence.
(9) Effects of density altitude on takeoff and climb performance.
(10) Weight and balance computations.
(11) Principles of aerodynamics, powerplants, and aircraft systems.
(12) If the course of training is for an airplane category, stall awareness, spin entry, spins, and spin recovery techniques.
(13) Air traffic control system and procedures for instrument flight operations.
(14) IFR navigation and approaches by use of navigation systems.
(15) Use of IFR en route and instrument approach procedure charts.
(16) Aeronautical decision making and judgment.
(17) Preflight action that includes—
(i) How to obtain information on runway lengths at airports of intended use, data on takeoff and landing distances, weather reports and forecasts, and fuel requirements.
(ii) How to plan for alternatives if the planned flight cannot be completed or delays are encountered.
(iii) Procurement and use of aviation weather reports and forecasts, and the elements of forecasting weather trends on the basis of that information and personal observation of weather conditions.
4. Flight training.
(a) Each approved course must include at least 70 hours of training, as described in section 4 and section 5 of this appendix, on the approved areas of operation listed in paragraph (d) of section 4 of this appendix that are appropriate to the aircraft category and class rating of the course:
(b) Each approved course must include at least the following flight training:
(1) For an airplane single engine course: 70 hours of flight training from an authorized instructor on the approved areas of operation in paragraph (d)(1) of this section that includes at least—
(i) Except as provided in § 61.111 of this chapter, 3 hours of cross-country flight training in a single engine airplane.
(ii) 3 hours of night flight training in a single-engine airplane that includes—
(A) One cross-country flight of more than 100 nautical miles total distance.
(B) 10 takeoffs and 10 landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport.
(iii) 35 hours of instrument flight training in a single-engine airplane that includes at least one cross-country flight that is performed under IFR and—
(A) Is a distance of at least 250 nautical miles along airways or air traffic control-directed (ATC-directed) routing with one segment of the flight consisting of at least a straight-line distance of 100 nautical miles between airports.
(B) Involves an instrument approach at each airport.
(C) Involves three different kinds of approaches with the use of navigation systems.
(iv) 3 hours of flight training in a single-engine airplane in preparation for the practical test within 60 days preceding the date of the test.
(2) For an airplane multiengine course: 70 hours of training from an authorized instructor on the approved areas of operation in paragraph (d)(2) of this section that includes at least—
(i) Except as provided in § 61.111 of this chapter, 3 hours of cross-country flight training in a multiengine airplane.
(ii) 3 hours of night flight training in a multiengine airplane that includes—
(A) One cross-country flight of more than 100 nautical miles total distance.
(B) 10 takeoffs and 10 landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport.
(iii) 35 hours of instrument flight training in a multiengine airplane that includes at least one cross-country flight that is performed under IFR and—
(A) Is a distance of at least 250 nautical miles along airways or ATC-directed routing with one segment of the flight consisting of at least a straight-line distance of 100 nautical miles between airports.
(B) Involves an instrument approach at each airport.
(C) Involves three different kinds of approaches with the use of navigation systems.
(iv) 3 hours of flight training in a multiengine airplane in preparation for the practical test within 60 days preceding the date of the test.
(3) For a rotorcraft helicopter course: 70 hours of training from an authorized instructor on the approved areas of operation in paragraph (d)(3) of this section that includes at least—
(i) Except as provided in § 61.111 of this chapter, 3 hours of cross-country flight training in a helicopter.
(ii) 3 hours of night flight training in a helicopter that includes—
(A) One cross-country flight of more than 50 nautical miles total distance.
(B) 10 takeoffs and 10 landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport.
(iii) 35 hours of instrument flight training in a helicopter that includes at least one cross-country flight that is performed under IFR and—
(A) Is a distance of at least 100 nautical miles along airways or ATC-directed routing with one segment of the flight consisting of at least a straight-line distance of 50 nautical miles between airports.
(B) Involves an instrument approach at each airport.
(C) Involves three different kinds of approaches with the use of navigation systems.
(iv) 3 hours of flight training in a helicopter in preparation for the practical test within 60 days preceding the date of the test.
(4) For a powered-lift course: 70 hours of training from an authorized instructor on the approved areas of operation in paragraph (d)(4) of this section that includes at least—
(i) Except as provided in § 61.111 of this chapter, 3 hours of cross-country flight training in a powered-lift.
(ii) 3 hours of night flight training in a powered-lift that includes—
(A) One cross-country flight of more than 100 nautical miles total distance.
(B) 10 takeoffs and 10 landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport.
(iii) 35 hours of instrument flight training in a powered-lift that includes at least one cross-country flight that is performed under IFR and—
(A) Is a distance of at least 250 nautical miles along airways or ATC-directed routing with one segment of the flight consisting of at least a straight-line distance of 100 nautical miles between airports.
(B) Involves an instrument approach at each airport.
(C) Involves three different kinds of approaches with the use of navigation systems.
(iv) 3 hours of flight training in a powered-lift in preparation for the practical test, within 60 days preceding the date of the test.
(c) For use of flight simulators or flight training devices:
(1) The course may include training in a combination of flight simulators, flight training devices, and aviation training device, provided it is representative of the aircraft for which the course is approved, meets the requirements of this section, and the training is given by an authorized instructor.
(2) Training in a flight simulator that meets the requirements of § 141.41(a) of this part may be credited for a maximum of 35 percent of the total flight training hour requirements of the approved course, or of this section, whichever is less.
(3) Training in a flight training device or aviation training device that meets the requirements of § 141.41(b) of this part may be credited for a maximum of 25 percent of the total flight training hour requirements of the approved course, or of this section, whichever is less.
(4) Training in a combination of flight simulators, flight training devices, or aviation training devices, described in paragraphs (c)(2) and (c)(3) of this section, may be credited for a maximum of 35 percent of the total flight training hour requirements of the approved course, or of this section, whichever is less. However, credit for training in a flight training device and aviation training device, that meets the requirements of § 141.41(b), cannot exceed the limitation provided for in paragraph (c)(3) of this section.
(d) Each approved course must include the flight training on the approved areas of operation listed in this section that are appropriate to the aircraft category and class rating course—
(1) For a combined private pilot certification and instrument rating course involving a single-engine airplane:
(i) Preflight preparation.
(ii) Preflight procedures.
(iii) Airport and seaplane base operations.
(iv) Takeoffs, landings, and go-arounds.
(v) Performance maneuvers.
(vi) Ground reference maneuvers.
(vii) Navigation and navigation systems.
(viii) Slow flight and stalls.
(ix) Basic instrument maneuvers and flight by reference to instruments.
(x) Instrument approach procedures.
(xi) Air traffic control clearances and procedures.
(xii) Emergency operations.
(xiii) Night operations.
(xiv) Postflight procedures.
(2) For a combined private pilot certification and instrument rating course involving a multiengine airplane:
(i) Preflight preparation.
(ii) Preflight procedures.
(iii) Airport and seaplane base operations.
(iv) Takeoffs, landings, and go-arounds.
(v) Performance maneuvers.
(vi) Ground reference maneuvers.
(vii) Navigation and navigation systems.
(viii) Slow flight and stalls.
(ix) Basic instrument maneuvers and flight by reference to instruments.
(x) Instrument approach procedures.
(xi) Air traffic control clearances and procedures.
(xii) Emergency operations.
(xiii) Multiengine operations.
(xiv) Night operations.
(xv) Postflight procedures.
(3) For a combined private pilot certification and instrument rating course involving a rotorcraft helicopter:
(i) Preflight preparation.
(ii) Preflight procedures.
(iii) Airport and heliport operations.
(iv) Hovering maneuvers.
(v) Takeoffs, landings, and go-arounds.
(vi) Performance maneuvers.
(vii) Navigation and navigation systems.
(viii) Basic instrument maneuvers and flight by reference to instruments.
(ix) Instrument approach procedures.
(x) Air traffic control clearances and procedures.
(xi) Emergency operations.
(xii) Night operations.
(xiii) Postflight procedures.
(4) For a combined private pilot certification and instrument rating course involving a powered-lift:
(i) Preflight preparation.
(ii) Preflight procedures.
(iii) Airport and heliport operations.
(iv) Hovering maneuvers.
(v) Takeoffs, landings, and go-arounds.
(vi) Performance maneuvers.
(vii) Ground reference maneuvers.
(viii) Navigation and navigation systems.
(ix) Slow flight and stalls.
(x) Basic instrument maneuvers and flight by reference to instruments.
(xi) Instrument approach procedures.
(xii) Air traffic control clearances and procedures.
(xiii) Emergency operations.
(xiv) Night operations.
(xv) Postflight procedures.
5. Solo flight training. Each approved course must include at least the following solo flight training:
(a) For a combined private pilot certification and instrument rating course involving an airplane single engine: Five hours of flying solo in a single-engine airplane on the appropriate areas of operation in paragraph (d)(1) of section 4 of this appendix that includes at least—
(1) One solo cross-country flight of at least 100 nautical miles with landings at a minimum of three points, and one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance of at least 50 nautical miles between the takeoff and landing locations.
(2) Three takeoffs and three landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower.
(b) For a combined private pilot certification and instrument rating course involving an airplane multiengine: Five hours of flying solo in a multiengine airplane or 5 hours of performing the duties of a pilot in command while under the supervision of an authorized instructor. The training must consist of the appropriate areas of operation in paragraph (d)(2) of section 4 of this appendix, and include at least—
(1) One cross-country flight of at least 100 nautical miles with landings at a minimum of three points, and one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance of at least 50 nautical miles between the takeoff and landing locations.
(2) Three takeoffs and three landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower.
(c) For a combined private pilot certification and instrument rating course involving a helicopter: Five hours of flying solo in a helicopter on the appropriate areas of operation in paragraph (d)(3) of section 4 of this appendix that includes at least—
(1) One solo cross-country flight of more than 50 nautical miles with landings at a minimum of three points, and one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance of at least 25 nautical miles between the takeoff and landing locations.
(2) Three takeoffs and three landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower.
(d) For a combined private pilot certification and instrument rating course involving a powered-lift: Five hours of flying solo in a powered-lift on the appropriate areas of operation in paragraph (d)(4) of section 4 of this appendix that includes at least—
(1) One solo cross-country flight of at least 100 nautical miles with landings at a minimum of three points, and one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance of at least 50 nautical miles between the takeoff and landing locations.
(2) Three takeoffs and three landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower.
6. Stage checks and end-of-course tests.
(a) Each student enrolled in a private pilot course must satisfactorily accomplish the stage checks and end-of-course tests in accordance with the school's approved training course that consists of the approved areas of operation listed in paragraph (d) of section 4 of this appendix that are appropriate to the aircraft category and class rating for which the course applies.
(b) Each student must demonstrate satisfactory proficiency prior to receiving an endorsement to operate an aircraft in solo flight.
[Doc. No. FAA-2008-0938, 76 FR 54108, Aug. 31, 2011]

Title 14 published on 2014-01-01

The following are only the Rules published in the Federal Register after the published date of Title 14.

For a complete list of all Rules, Proposed Rules, and Notices view the Rulemaking tab.

  • 2014-12-03; vol. 79 # 232 - Wednesday, December 3, 2014
    1. 79 FR 71634 - Aviation Training Device Credit for Pilot Certification
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, Federal Aviation Administration
      Direct final rule.
      Effective January 20, 2015. Send comments on or before January 2, 2015. If the FAA receives an adverse comment or notice of intent to file an adverse comment, the FAA will advise the public by publishing a document in the Federal Register before the effective date of the final rule, which may withdraw this direct final rule in whole or in part.
      14 CFR Parts 61 and 141

Title 14 published on 2014-01-01

The following are ALL rules, proposed rules, and notices (chronologically) published in the Federal Register relating to 14 CFR 141 after this date.

  • 2014-12-03; vol. 79 # 232 - Wednesday, December 3, 2014
    1. 79 FR 71634 - Aviation Training Device Credit for Pilot Certification
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, Federal Aviation Administration
      Direct final rule.
      Effective January 20, 2015. Send comments on or before January 2, 2015. If the FAA receives an adverse comment or notice of intent to file an adverse comment, the FAA will advise the public by publishing a document in the Federal Register before the effective date of the final rule, which may withdraw this direct final rule in whole or in part.
      14 CFR Parts 61 and 141