15 CFR 760.5 - Reporting requirements.

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§ 760.5 Reporting requirements.
(a) Scope of reporting requirements.
(1) A United States person who receives a request to take any action which has the effect of furthering or supporting a restrictive trade practice or boycott fostered or imposed by a foreign country against a country friendly to the United States or against any United States person must report such request to the Department of Commerce in accordance with the requirements of this section. Such a request may be either written or oral and may include a request to furnish information or enter into or implement an agreement. It may also include a solicitation, directive, legend or instruction that asks for information or that asks that a United States person take or refrain from taking a particular action. Such a request shall be reported regardless of whether the action requested is prohibited or permissible under this part, except as otherwise provided by this section.
(2) For purposes of this section, a request received by a United States person is reportable if he knows or has reason to know that the purpose of the request is to enforce, implement, or otherwise further, support, or secure compliance with an unsanctioned foreign boycott or restrictive trade practice.
(i) A request received by a United States person located in the United States is reportable if it is received in connection with a transaction or activity in the interstate or foreign commerce of the United States, as determined under § 760.1(d)(1) through (5) and (18) of this part.
(ii) A request received by a United States person located outside the United States (that is, a foreign subsidiary, partnership, affiliate, branch, office, or other permanent foreign establishment which is controlled in fact by any domestic concern, as determined under § 760.1(c) of this part) is reportable if it is received in connection with a transaction or activity in the interstate or foreign commerce of the United States, as determined under § 760.1(d)(6) through (17) and (19) of this part.
(iii) A request such as a boycott questionnaire, unrelated to a particular transaction or activity, received by any United States person is reportable when such person has or anticipates a business relationship with or in a boycotting country involving the sale, purchase or transfer of goods or services (including information) in the interstate or foreign commerce of the United States, as determined under § 760.1(d) of this part.
(3) These reporting requirements apply to all United States persons. They apply whether the United States person receiving the request is an exporter, bank or other financial institution, insurer, freight forwarder, manufacturer, or any other United States person subject to this part.
(4) The acquisition of information about a boycotting country's boycott requirements through the receipt or review of books, pamphlets, legal texts, exporters' guidebooks and other similar publications does not constitute receipt of a reportable request for purposes of this section. In addition, a United States person who receives an unsolicited invitation to bid, or similar proposal, containing a boycott request has not received a reportable request for purposes of this section where he does not respond to the invitation to bid or other proposal.
(5) Because of the use of certain terms for boycott and non-boycott purposes; because of Congressional mandates to provide clear and precise guidelines in areas of inherent uncertainty; and because of the Department's commitment to minimize paperwork and reduce the cost of reporting where it will not impair the Department's ability to continue to monitor foreign boycotts, the following specific requests are not reportable:
(i) A request to refrain from shipping goods on a carrier which flies the flag of a particular country or which is owned, chartered, leased or operated by a particular country or by nationals or residents of a particular country, or a request to certify to that effect.
(ii) A request to ship goods via a prescribed route, or a request to refrain from shipping goods via a proscribed route, or a request to certify to either effect.
(iii) A request to supply an affirmative statement or certification regarding the country of origin of goods.
(iv) A request to supply an affirmative statement or certification regarding the name of the supplier or manufacturer of the goods shipped or the name of the provider of services.
(v) A request to comply with the laws of another country except where the request expressly requires compliance with that country's boycott laws.
(vi) A request to an individual to supply information about himself or a member of his family for immigration, passport, visa, or employment purposes.
(vii) A request to supply an affirmative statement or certification indicating the destination of exports or confirming or otherwise indicating that such cargo will be unloaded or discharged at a particular destination.
(viii) A request to supply a certificate by the owner, master, charterer, or any employee thereof, that a vessel, aircraft, truck or any other mode of transportation is eligible, otherwise eligible, permitted, or allowed to enter, or not restricted from entering, a particular port, country, or group of countries pursuant to the laws, rules, or regulations of that port, country, or group of countries.
(ix) A request to supply a certificate from an insurance company stating that the insurance company has a duly authorized agent or representative within a boycotting country and/or the name and address of such agent.
(x) A request to comply with a term or condition of a transaction that provides that the vendor bear the risk of loss and indemnify the purchaser if the vendor's goods are denied entry into a country for any reason (“risk of loss clause”) if such clause was in use by the purchaser prior to January 18, 1978.
(6) No United States person may engage in any transaction or take any other action, either independently or through any other person, with intent to evade the provisions of this part.
(7) From time to time the Department will survey domestic concerns for purposes of determining the worldwide scope of boycott requests received by their controlled foreign subsidiaries and affiliates with respect to their activities outside United States commerce. This pertains to requests which would be reportable under this section but for the fact that the activities to which the requests relate are outside United States commerce. The information requested will include the number and nature of non-reportable boycott requests received, the action(s) requested, the actions(s) taken in response and the countries in which the requests originate. The results of such surveys, including the names of those surveyed, will be made public.
(b) Manner of reporting.
(1) Each reportable request must be reported. However, if more than one document (such as an invitation to bid, purchase order, or letter of credit) containing the same boycott request is received as part of the same transaction, only the first such request need be reported. Individual shipments against the same purchase order or letter of credit are to be treated as part of the same transaction. Each different boycott request associated with a given transaction must be reported, regardless of how or when the request is received.
(2) Each United States person actually receiving a reportable request must report that request. However, such person may designate someone else to report on his behalf. For example, a United States company, if authorized, may report on behalf of its controlled foreign subsidiary or affiliates; a freight forwarder, if authorized, may report on behalf of the exporter; and a bank, if authorized, may report on behalf of the beneficiary of a letter of credit. If a person designated to report a request received by another receives an identical request directed to him in connection with the same transaction, he may file one report on behalf of himself and the other person.
(3) Where a person is designated to report on behalf of another, the person receiving the request remains liable for any failure to report or for any representations made on his behalf. Further, anyone reporting on behalf of another is not relieved of his own responsibility for reporting any boycott request which he receives, even if it is an identical request in connection with the same transaction.
(4) Reports must be submitted in duplicate to: Report Processing Staff, Office of Antiboycott Compliance, U.S. Department of Commerce, Room 6098, Washington, D.C. 20230. Each submission must be made in accordance with the following requirements:
(i) Where the person receiving the request is a United States person located in the United States, each report of requests must be postmarked by the last day of the month following the calendar quarter in which the request was received (e.g., April 30 for the quarter consisting of January, February, and March).
(ii) Where the person receiving the request is a United States person located outside the United States, each report of requests must be postmarked by the last day of the second month following the calendar quarter in which the request was received (e.g., May 31 for the quarter consisting of January, February, and March).
(5) At the reporting person's option, reports may be submitted on either a single transaction form (Form BIS-621P, Report of Restrictive Trade Practice or Boycott Request Single Transaction (revised 10-89)) or on a multiple transaction form (Form BIS-6051P, Report of Request for Restrictive Trade Practice or Boycott Multiple Transactions (revised 10-89)). Use of the multiple transaction form permits the reporting person to provide on one form all required information relating to as many as 75 reportable requests received within any single reporting period.
(6) Reports, whether submitted on the single transaction form or on the multiple transaction form, must contain entries for every applicable item on the form, including whether the reporting person intends to take or has taken the action requested. If the reporting person has not decided what action he will take by the time the report is required to be filed, he must later report the action he decides to take within 10 business days after deciding. In addition, anyone filing a report on behalf of another must so indicate and identify that other person.
(7) Each report of a boycott request must be accompanied by two copies of the relevant page(s) of any document(s) in which the request appears. Reports may also be accompanied by any additional information relating to the request as the reporting person desires to provide concerning his response to the request.
(8) Records containing information relating to a reportable boycott request, including a copy of any document(s) in which the request appears, must be maintained by the recipient for a five-year period after receipt of the request. The Department may require that these materials be submitted to it or that it have access to them at any time within that period. (See part 762 of the EAR for additional recordkeeping requirements.)
(c) Disclosure of information.
(1) Reports of requests received on or after October 7, 1976, as well as any accompanying documents filed with the reports, have been and will continue to be made available for public inspection and copying, except for certain proprietary information. With respect to reports of requests received on or after August 1, 1978, if the person making the report certifies that a United States person to whom the report relates would be placed at a competitive disadvantage because of the disclosure of information regarding the quantity, description, or value of any articles, materials, and supplies, including related technical data and other information, whether contained in a report or in any accompanying document(s), such information will not be publicly disclosed except upon failure by the reporting entity to edit the public inspection copy of the accompanying document(s) as provided by paragraph (c)(2) of this section, unless the Secretary of Commerce determines that the disclosure would not place the United States person involved at a competitive disadvantage or that it would be contrary to the national interest to withhold the information. In the event the Secretary of Commerce considers making such a determination concerning competitive disadvantage, appropriate notice and an opportunity for comment will be given before any such proprietary information is publicly disclosed. In no event will requests of reporting persons to withhold any information contained in the report other than that specified in this paragraph be honored.
(2) Because a copy of any document(s) accompanying the report will be made available for public inspection and copying, one copy must be submitted intact and another copy must be edited by the reporting entity to delete the same information which it certified in the report would place a United States person at a competitive disadvantage if disclosed. In addition, the reporting entity may delete from this copy information that is considered confidential and that is not required to be contained in the report (e.g., information related to foreign consignee). This copy should be conspicuously marked with the legend “Public Inspection Copy.” With respect to documents accompanying reports received by the Department on or after July 1, 1979, the public inspection copy will be made available as submitted whether or not it has been appropriately edited by the reporting entity as provided by this paragraph.
(3) Reports and accompanying documents which are available to the public for inspection and copying are located in the BIS Freedom of Information Records Inspection Facility, Room 4525, Department of Commerce, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20230. Requests to inspect such documents should be addressed to that facility.
(4) The Secretary of Commerce will periodically transmit summaries of the information contained in the reports to the Secretary of State for such action as the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Secretary of Commerce, may deem appropriate for carrying out the policies in section 8(b)(2) of the Export Administration Act of 1979.
Examples
The following examples are intended to give guidance in determining what is reportable. They are illustrative, not comprehensive.
(i) A, a U.S. manufacturer, is shipping goods to boycotting country Y and is asked by Y to certify that it is not blacklisted by Y's boycott office.
The request to A is reportable, because it is a request to A to comply with Y's boycott requirements.
(ii) A, a U.S. manufacturing company, receives an order for tractors from boycotting country Y. Y's order specifies that the tires on the tractors be made by B, another U.S. company. A believes Y has specified B as the tire supplier because otherwise A would have used tires made by C, a blacklisted company, and Y will not take shipment of tractors containing tires made by blacklisted companies.
A must report Y's request for tires made by B, because A has reason to know that B was chosen for boycott reasons.
(iii) Same as (ii), except A knows that Y's request has nothing to do with the boycott but simply reflects Y's preference for tires made by B.
Y's request is not reportable, because it is unrelated to Y's boycott.
(iv) Same as (ii), except A neither knows nor has reason to know why Y has chosen B.
Y's request is not reportable, because A neither knows nor has reason to know that Y's request is based on Y's boycott.
(v) A, a controlled foreign subsidiary of U.S. company B, is a resident of boycotting country Y. A is a general contractor. After being supplied by A with a list of competent subcontractors, A's customer instructs A to use subcontractor C on the project. A believes that C was chosen because, among other things, the other listed subcontractors are blacklisted.
The instruction to A by its customer that C be used on the project is reportable, because it is a request to comply with Y's boycott requirements.
(vi) A, a controlled foreign subsidiary of U.S. company B, is located in non-boycotting country P. A receives an order for washing machines from boycotting country Y. Y instructs A that a negative certificate of origin must accompany the shipment. The washing machines are made wholly in P, without U.S. components.
Y's instruction to A regarding the negative certificate of origin is not reportable, because the transaction to which it relates is not in U.S. commerce.
(vii) Same as (vi), except that A obtains components from the United States for the purpose of filling the order from Y. Y's instruction to A regarding the negative certificate of origin is reportable, because the transaction to which it relates is in U.S. commerce.
(viii) A, a U.S. construction company, receives in the mail an unsolicited invitation to bid on a construction project in boycotting country Y. The invitation to bid requires those who respond to certify that they do not have any plants or branch offices in boycotted country X. A does not respond.
A's receipt of the unsolicited invitation to bid is not reportable, because the request does not relate to any present or anticipated business of A with or in Y.
(ix) Same as (viii), except that A receives a boycott questionnaire from a central boycott office. A does not do business in any of the boycotting countries involved, and does not anticipate doing any business in those countries. A does not respond.
A's receipt of the boycott questionnaire is not reportable, because it does not relate to any present or anticipated business by A with or in a boycotting country.
(x) A, a U.S. manufacturer, is seeking markets in which to expand its exports. A sends a representative to boycotting country Y to explore Y's potential as a market for A's products. A's representative discusses its products but does not enter into any contracts on that trip. A does, however, hope that sales will materialize in the future. Subsequently, A receives a boycott questionnaire from Y.
A's receipt of the boycott questionnaire is reportable, because the request relates to A's anticipated business with or in a boycotting country. For purposes of determining whether a report is required, it makes no difference whether A responds to the questionnaire, and it makes no difference that actual sales contracts are not in existence or do not materialize.
(xi) Same as (x), except that A's representative enters into a contract to sell A's products to a buyer in boycotting country Y. Subsequently, A receives a boycott questionnaire from Y.
A's receipt of the boycott questionnaire is reportable, because it relates to A's present business with or in a boycotting country. For purposes of determining whether a report is required, it makes no difference whether A responds to the questionnaire.
(xii) A, a U.S. freight forwarder, purchases an exporter's guidebook which includes the import requirements of boycotting country Y. The guidebook contains descriptions of actions which U.S. exporters must take in order to make delivery of goods to Y.
A's acquisition of the guidebook is not reportable, because he has not received a request from anyone.
(xiii) A, a U.S. freight forwarder, is arranging for the shipment of goods to boycotting country Y at the request of B, a U.S. exporter. B asks A to assume responsibility to assure that the documentation accompanying the shipment is in compliance with Y's import requirements. A examines an exporters' guidebook, determines that Y's import regulations require a certification that the insurer of the goods is not blacklisted and asks U.S. insurer C for such a certification.
B's request to A is reportable by A, because it constitutes a request to comply with Y's boycott as of the time A takes action to comply with Y's boycott requirements in response to the request. A's request to C is reportable by C.
(xiv) A, a U.S. freight forwarder, is arranging for the shipment of U.S. goods to boycotting country Y. The manufacturer supplies A with all the necessary documentation to accompany the shipment. Among the documents supplied by the manufacturer is his certificate that he himself is not blacklisted. A transmits the documentation supplied by the manufacturer.
A's action in merely transmitting documents received from the manufacturer is not reportable, because A has received no request to comply with Y's boycott.
(xv) Same as (xiv), except that A is asked by U.S. exporter B to assume the responsibility to assure that the necessary documentation accompanies the shipment whatever that documentation might be. B forwards to A a letter of credit which requires that a negative certificate of origin accompany the bill of lading. A supplies a positive certificate of origin.
Both A and B must report receipt of the letter of credit, because it contains a request to both of them to comply with Y's boycott.
(xvi) Same as (xiv), except that the manufacturer fails to supply a required negative certificate of origin, and A is subsequently asked by a consular official of Y to see to it that the certificate is supplied. A supplies a positive certificate of origin.
The consular official's request to A is reportable by A, because A was asked to comply with Y's boycott requirements by supplying the negative certificate of origin.
(xvii) A, a U.S. manufacturer, is shipping goods to boycotting country Y. Arrangements have been made for freight forwarder B to handle the shipment and secure all necessary shipping certifications. B notes that the letter of credit requires that the manufacturer supply a negative certificate of origin and B asks A to do so. A supplies a positive certificate of origin.
B's request to A is reportable by A, because A is asked to comply with Y's boycott requirements by providing the negative certificate.
(xviii) A, a controlled foreign subsidiary of U.S. company B, is a resident of boycotting country Y. A is engaged in oil exploration and drilling operations in Y. In placing orders for drilling equipment to be shipped from the United States, A, in compliance with Y's laws, selects only those suppliers who are not blacklisted.
A's action in choosing non-blacklisted suppliers is not reportable, because A has not received a request to comply with Y's boycott in making these selections.
(xix) A, a controlled foreign subsidiary of U.S. company B, is seeking permission to do business in boycotting country Y. Before being granted such permission, A is asked to sign an agreement to comply with Y's boycott laws.
The request to A is reportable, because it is a request that expressly requires compliance with Y's boycott law and is received in connection with A's anticipated business in Y.
(xx) A, a U.S. bank, is asked by a firm in boycotting country Y to confirm a letter of credit in favor of B, a U.S. company. The letter of credit calls for a certificate from B that the goods to be supplied are not produced by a firm blacklisted by Y. A informs B of the letter of credit, including its certification condition, and sends B a copy.
B must report the certification request contained in the letter of credit, and A must report the request to confirm the letter of credit containing the boycott condition, because both are being asked to comply with Y's boycott.
(xxi) Same as (xx), except that the letter of credit calls for a certificate from the beneficiary that the goods will not be shipped on a vessel that will call at a port in boycotted country X before making delivery in Y.
The request is not reportable, because it is a request of a type deemed by this section to be in common use for non-boycott purposes.
(xxii) A, a U.S. company, receives a letter of credit from boycotting country Y stating that on no condition may a bank blacklisted by Y be permitted to negotiate the credit.
A's receipt of the letter of credit is reportable, because it contains a request to A to comply with Y's boycott requirements.
(xxiii) A, a U.S. bank, receives a demand draft from B, a U.S. company, in connection with B's shipment of goods to boycotting country Y. The draft contains a directive that it is valid in all countries except boycotted country X.
A's receipt of the demand draft is reportable, because it contains a request to A to comply with Y's boycott requirements.
(xxiv) A, a U.S. exporter, receives an order from boycotting country Y. On the order is a legend that A's goods, invoices, and packaging must not bear a six-pointed star or other symbol of boycotted country X.
A's receipt of the order is reportable, because it contains a request to comply with Y's boycott requirements.
(xxv) Same as (xxiv), except the order contains a statement that goods exported must not represent part of war reparations to boycotted country X.
A's receipt of the order is reportable, because it contains a request to A to comply with Y's boycott requirements.
(xxvi) A, a U.S. contractor, is negotiating with boycotting country Y to build a school in Y. During the course of the negotiations, Y suggests that one of the terms of the construction contract be that A agree not to import materials produced in boycotted country X. It is A's company policy not to agree to such a contractual clause, and A suggests that instead it agree that all of the necessary materials will be obtained from U.S. suppliers. Y agrees to A's suggestion and a contract is executed.
A has received a reportable request, but, for purposes of reporting, the request is deemed to be received when the contract is executed.
(xxvii) Same as (xxvi), except Y does not accept A's suggested alternative clause and negotiations break off.
A's receipt of Y's request is reportable. For purposes of reporting, it makes no difference that A was not successful in the negotiations. The request is deemed to be received at the time the negotiations break off.
(xxviii) A, a U.S. insurance company, is insuring the shipment of drilling equipment to boycotting country Y. The transaction is being financed by a letter of credit which requires that A certify that it is not blacklisted by Y. Freight forwarder B asks A to supply the certification in order to satisfy the requirements of the letter of credit.
The request to A is reportable by A, because it is a request to comply with Y's boycott requirements.
(xxix) A, a U.S. manufacturer, is engaged from time-to-time in supplying drilling rigs to company B in boycotting country Y. B insists that its suppliers sign contracts which provide that, even after title passes from the supplier to B, the supplier will bear the risk of loss and indemnify B if goods which the supplier has furnished are denied entry into Y for whatever reason. A knows or has reason to know that this contractual provision is required by B because of Y's boycott, and that B has been using the provision since 1977. A receives an order from B which contains such a clause.
B's request is not reportable by A, because the request is deemed to be not reportable by these regulations if the provision was in use by B prior to January 18, 1978.
(xxx) Same as (xxix), except that A does not know when B began using the provision.
Unless A receives information from B that B introduced the term prior to January 18, 1978, A must report receipt of the request.
(xxxi) A, a U.S. citizen, is a shipping clerk for B, a U.S. manufacturing company. In the course of his employment, A receives an order for goods from boycotting country Y. The order specifies that none of the components of the goods is to be furnished by blacklisted firms.
B must report the request received by its employee, A, acting in the scope of his employment. Although A is a U.S. person, such an individual does not have a separate obligation to report requests received by him in his capacity as an employee of B.
(xxxii) U.S. exporter A is negotiating a transaction with boycotting country Y. A knows that at the conclusion of the negotiations he will be asked by Y to supply certain boycott-related information and that such a request is reportable. In an effort to forestall the request and thereby avoid having to file a report, A supplies the information in advance.
A is deemed to have received a reportable request.
(xxxiii) A, a controlled foreign affiliate of U.S. company B, receives an order for computers from boycotting country Y and obtains components from the United States for the purpose of filling the order. Y instructs A that a negative certificate of origin must accompany the shipment.
Y's instruction to A regarding the negative certificate of origin is reportable by A. Moreover, A may designate B or any other person to report on its behalf. However, A remains liable for any failure to report or for any representations made on its behalf.
(xxxiv) U.S. exporter A, in shipping goods to boycotting country Y, receives a request from the customer in Y to state on the bill of lading that the vessel is allowed to enter Y's ports. The request further states that a certificate from the owner or master of the vessel to that effect is acceptable.
The request A received from his customer in Y is not reportable because it is a request of a type deemed to be not reportable by these regulations. (A may not make such a statement on the bill of lading himself, if he knows or has reason to know it is requested for a boycott purpose.)
(xxxv) U.S. exporter A, in shipping goods to boycotting country Y, receives a request from the customer in Y to furnish a certificate from the owner of the vessel that the vessel is permitted to call at Y's ports.
The request A received from his customer in Y is not reportable because it is a request of a type deemed to be not reportable by these regulations.
(xxxvi) U.S. exporter A, in shipping goods to boycotting country Y, receives a request from the customer in Y to furnish a certificate from the insurance company indicating that the company has a duly authorized representative in country Y and giving the name of that representative.
The request A received from his customer in Y is not reportable if it was received after the effective date of these rules, because it is a request of a type deemed to be not reportable by these regulations.
[61 FR 12862, Mar. 25, 1996, as amended at 65 FR 34948, June 1, 2000]

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  • 2014-08-29; vol. 79 # 168 - Friday, August 29, 2014
    1. 79 FR 51475 - Updated Statements of Legal Authority for the Export Administration Regulations
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  • 2014-08-29; vol. 79 # 168 - Friday, August 29, 2014
    1. 79 FR 51475 - Updated Statements of Legal Authority for the Export Administration Regulations
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      DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, Bureau of Industry and Security
      Final rule.
      The rule is effective August 29, 2014.
      15 CFR Parts 730, 732, 734, 736, 738, 740, 742, 743, 744, 746, 747, 748, 750, 752, 754, 756, 758, 760, 762, 764, 766, 768, 770, 772, and 774