15 CFR Part 734, Supplement No. 2 to Part 734 - Guidelines for De Minimis Rules

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Supplement No. 2 to Part 734—Guidelines for De Minimis Rules
(a) Calculation of the value of controlled U.S.-origin content in foreign-made items is to be performed for the purposes of § 734.4 of this part, to determine whether the percentage of U.S.-origin content is de minimis. (Note that you do not need to make these calculations if the foreign made item does not require a license to the destination in question.) Use the following guidelines to perform such calculations:
(1) U.S.-origin controlled content. To identify U.S.-origin controlled content for purposes of the de minimis rules, you must determine the Export Control Classification Number (ECCN) of each U.S.-origin item incorporated into a foreign-made product. Then, you must identify which, if any, of those U.S.-origin items would require a license from BIS if they were to be exported or reexported (in the form in which you received them) to the foreign-made product's country of destination. For purposes of identifying U.S.-origin controlled content, you should consult the Commerce Country Chart in Supplement No. 1 to part 738 of the EAR and controls described in part 746 of the EAR. Part 744 of the EAR should not be used to identify controlled U.S. content for purposes of determining the applicability of the de minimis rules. In identifying U.S.-origin controlled content, do not take account of commodities, software, or technology that could be exported or reexported to the country of destination without a license (designated as “NLR”) or under License Exception GBS (see part 740 of the EAR). Commodities subject only to short supply controls are not included in calculating U.S. content.
Note to paragraph (a)(1):
U.S.-origin controlled content is considered ‘incorporated’ for de minimis purposes if the U.S.-origin controlled item is: Essential to the functioning of the foreign equipment; customarily included in sales of the foreign equipment; and reexported with the foreign produced item. U.S.-origin software may be ‘bundled’ with foreign produced commodities; see § 734.4 of this part. For purposes of determining de minimis levels, technology and source code used to design or produce foreign-made commodities or software are not considered to be incorporated into such foreign-made commodities or software.
(2) Value of U.S.-origin controlled content. The value of the U.S.-origin controlled content shall reflect the fair market price of such content in the market where the foreign product is being produced. In most cases, this value will be the same as the actual cost to the foreign manufacturer of the U.S.-origin commodity, technology, or software. When the foreign manufacturer and the U.S. supplier are affiliated and have special arrangements that result in below-market pricing, the value of the U.S.-origin controlled content should reflect fair market prices that would normally be charged to unaffiliated customers in the same foreign market. If fair market value cannot be determined based upon actual arms-length transaction data for the U.S.-origin controlled content in question, then you must determine another reliable valuation method to calculate or derive the fair market value. Such methods may include the use of comparable market prices or costs of production and distribution. The EAR do not require calculations based upon any one accounting system or U.S. accounting standards. However, the method you use must be consistent with your business practice.
(3) Foreign-made product value—(i) General. The value of the foreign-made product shall reflect the fair market price of such product in the market where the foreign product is sold. In most cases, this value will be the same as the actual cost to a buyer of the foreign-made product. When the foreign manufacturer and the buyer of their product are affiliated and have special arrangements that result in below-market pricing, the value of the foreign-made product should reflect fair market prices that would normally be charged to unaffiliated customers in the same foreign market. If fair market value cannot be determined based upon actual arms-length transaction data for the foreign-made product in question, then you must determine another reliable valuation method to calculate or derive the fair market value. Such methods may include the use of comparable market prices or costs of production and distribution. The EAR do not require calculations based upon any one accounting system or U.S. accounting standards. However, the method you use must be consistent with your business practice.
(ii) Foreign-Made Software. In calculating the value of foreign-made software for purposes of the de minimis rules, you may make an estimate of future sales of that foreign software. The total value of foreign-made software will be the sum of: The value of actual sales of that software based on orders received at the time the foreign software incorporates U.S.-origin content and, if applicable; and an estimate of all future sales of that software.
Note to paragraph (a)(3):
Regardless of the accounting systems, standard, or conventions you use in the operation of your business, you may not depreciate reported fair market values or otherwise reduce fair market values through related accounting conventions. Values may be historic or projected. However, you may rely on projected values only to the extent that they remain consistent with your documentation.
(4) Calculating percentage value of U.S.-origin items. To determine the percentage value of U.S-origin controlled content incorporated in, commingled with, or “bundled” with the foreign produced item, divide the total value of the U.S.-origin controlled content by the foreign-made item value, then multiply the resulting number times 100. If the percentage value of incorporated U.S.-origin items is equal to or less than the de minimis level described in § 734.4 of the EAR, then the foreign-made item is not subject to the EAR.
(b) One-time report. As stated in paragraphs (c) and (d) of § 734.4, a one-time report is required before reliance on the de minimis rules for technology. The purpose of the report is solely to permit the U.S. Government to evaluate whether U.S. content calculations were performed correctly.
(1) Contents of report. You must include in your report a description of the scope and nature of the foreign technology that is the subject of the report and a description of its fair market value, along with the rationale and basis for the valuation of such foreign technology. Your report must indicate the country of destination for the foreign technology reexports when the U.S.-origin controlled content exceeds 10%, so that BIS can evaluate whether the U.S.-origin controlled content was correctly identified based on paragraph (a)(1) of this Supplement. The report does not require information regarding the end-use or end-users of the reexported foreign technology. You must include in your report the name, title, address, telephone number, E-mail address, and facsimile number of the person BIS may contact concerning your report.
(2) Submission of report. You must submit your report to BIS using one of the following methods:
(i) E-mail: rpd2@bis.doc.gov ;
(ii) Fax: (202) 482-3355; or
(iii) Mail or Hand Delivery/Courier: Regulatory Policy Division, U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security, Regulatory Policy Division, 14th and Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Room 2705, Washington, DC 20230.
(3) Report and wait. If you have not been contacted by BIS concerning your report within thirty days after filing the report with BIS, you may rely upon the calculations described in the report unless and until BIS contacts you and instructs you otherwise. BIS may contact you with questions concerning your report or to indicate that BIS does not accept the assumptions or rationale for your calculations. If you receive such a contact or communication from BIS within thirty days after filing the report with BIS, you may not rely upon the calculations described in the report, and may not use the de minimis rules for technology that are described in § 734.4 of this part, until BIS has indicated that such calculations were performed correctly.
[73 FR 56969, Oct. 1, 2008]

Title 15 published on 2014-01-01

The following are only the Rules published in the Federal Register after the published date of Title 15.

For a complete list of all Rules, Proposed Rules, and Notices view the Rulemaking tab.

  • 2014-08-04; vol. 79 # 149 - Monday, August 4, 2014
    1. 79 FR 45288 - Wassenaar Arrangement 2013 Plenary Agreements Implementation: Commerce Control List, Definitions, and Reports; and Extension of Fly-by-Wire Technology and Software Controls
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, Bureau of Industry and Security
      Final rule.
      This rule is effective August 4, 2014, except the amendments to parts 734, 743, and ECCN 4A003 (amendatory instructions: 2, 9, and 28), which are effective on August 30, 2014.
      15 CFR Parts 734, 738, 740, 743, 772, and 774

Title 15 published on 2014-01-01

The following are ALL rules, proposed rules, and notices (chronologically) published in the Federal Register relating to 15 CFR 734 after this date.

  • 2014-08-04; vol. 79 # 149 - Monday, August 4, 2014
    1. 79 FR 45288 - Wassenaar Arrangement 2013 Plenary Agreements Implementation: Commerce Control List, Definitions, and Reports; and Extension of Fly-by-Wire Technology and Software Controls
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, Bureau of Industry and Security
      Final rule.
      This rule is effective August 4, 2014, except the amendments to parts 734, 743, and ECCN 4A003 (amendatory instructions: 2, 9, and 28), which are effective on August 30, 2014.
      15 CFR Parts 734, 738, 740, 743, 772, and 774