19 CFR 10.248 - Additional requirements for preferential treatment of brassieres.

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§ 10.248 Additional requirements for preferential treatment of brassieres.
(a) Definitions. When used in this section, the following terms have the meanings indicated:
(1) Producer. “Producer” means an individual, corporation, partnership, association, or other entity or group that exercises direct, daily operational control over the production process in an ATPDEA beneficiary country.
(2) Entity controlling production. “Entity controlling production” means an individual, corporation, partnership, association, or other entity or group that is not a producer and that controls the production process in an ATPDEA beneficiary country through a contractual relationship or other indirect means.
(3) Fabrics formed in the United States. “Fabrics formed in the United States” means fabrics that were produced by a weaving, knitting, needling, tufting, felting, entangling or other fabric-making process performed in the United States.
(4) Cost. “Cost” when used with reference to fabrics formed in the United States means:
(i) The price of the fabrics when last purchased, f.o.b. port of exportation, as set out in the invoice or other commercial documents, or, if the price is other than f.o.b. port of exportation:
(A) The price as set out in the invoice or other commercial documents adjusted to arrive at an f.o.b. port of exportation price; or
(B) If no exportation to an ATPDEA beneficiary country is involved, the price as set out in the invoice or other commercial documents, less the freight, insurance, packing, and other costs incurred in transporting the fabrics to the place of production if included in that price; or
(ii) If the price cannot be determined under paragraph (a)(4)(i) of this section or if CBP finds that price to be unreasonable, all reasonable expenses incurred in the growth, production, manufacture, or other processing of the fabrics, including the cost or value of materials (which includes the cost of non-recoverable scrap generated in forming the fabrics) and general expenses, plus a reasonable amount for profit, and the freight, insurance, packing, and other costs, if any, incurred in transporting the fabrics to the port of exportation.
(5) Declared customs value. “Declared customs value” when used with reference to fabric contained in an article means the sum of:
(i) The cost of fabrics formed in the United States that the producer or entity controlling production can verify; and
(ii) The cost of all other fabric contained in the article, exclusive of all findings and trimmings, determined as follows:
(A) In the case of fabric purchased by the producer or entity controlling production, the f.o.b. port of exportation price of the fabric as set out in the invoice or other commercial documents, or, if the price is other than f.o.b. port of exportation:
(1) The price as set out in the invoice or other commercial documents adjusted to arrive at an f.o.b. port of exportation price, plus expenses for embroidering and dyeing, printing, and finishing operations applied to the fabric if not included in that price; or
(2) If no exportation to an ATPDEA beneficiary country is involved, the price as set out in the invoice or other commercial documents, plus expenses for embroidering and dyeing, printing, and finishing operations applied to the fabric if not included in that price, but less the freight, insurance, packing, and other costs incurred in transporting the fabric to the place of production if included in that price;
(B) In the case of fabric for which the cost cannot be determined under paragraph (a)(5)(ii)(A) of this section or if CBP finds that cost to be unreasonable, all reasonable expenses incurred in the growth, production, or manufacture of the fabric, including the cost or value of materials (which includes the cost of non-recoverable scrap generated in the growth, production, or manufacture of the fabric), general expenses and embroidering and dyeing, printing, and finishing expenses, plus a reasonable amount for profit, and the freight, insurance, packing, and other costs, if any, incurred in transporting the fabric to the port of exportation;
(C) In the case of fabric components purchased by the producer or entity controlling production, the f.o.b. port of exportation price of those fabric components as set out in the invoice or other commercial documents, less the cost or value of any non-textile materials, and less expenses for cutting or other processing to create the fabric components other than knitting to shape, that the producer or entity controlling production can verify, or, if the price is other than f.o.b. port of exportation:
(1) The price as set out in the invoice or other commercial documents adjusted to arrive at an f.o.b. port of exportation price, less the cost or value of any non-textile materials, and less expenses for cutting or other processing to create the fabric components other than knitting to shape, that the producer or entity controlling production can verify; or
(2) If no exportation to an ATPDEA beneficiary country is involved, the price as set out in the invoice or other commercial documents, less the cost or value of any non-textile materials, and less expenses for cutting or other processing to create the fabric components other than knitting to shape, that the producer or entity controlling production can verify, and less the freight, insurance, packing, and other costs incurred in transporting the fabric components to the place of production if included in that price; and
(D) In the case of fabric components for which a fabric cost cannot be determined under paragraph (a)(5)(ii)(C) of this section or if CBP finds that cost to be unreasonable: All reasonable expenses incurred in the growth, production, or manufacture of the fabric components, including the cost or value of materials (which does not include the cost of recoverable scrap generated in the growth, production, or manufacture of the fabric components) and general expenses, but excluding the cost or value of any non-textile materials, and excluding expenses for cutting or other processing to create the fabric components other than knitting to shape, that the producer or entity controlling production can verify, plus a reasonable amount for profit, and the freight, insurance, packing, and other costs, if any, incurred in transporting the fabric components to the port of exportation.
(6) Year. “Year” means a 12-month period beginning on October 1 and ending on September 30 but does not include any 12-month period that began prior to October 1, 2002.
(7) Entered. “Entered” means entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, in the customs territory of the United States.
(b) Limitations on preferential treatment—
(1) General. During the year that begins on October 1, 2003, and during any subsequent year, articles of a producer or an entity controlling production that conform to the production standards set forth in § 10.243(a)(4) will be eligible for preferential treatment only if:
(i) The aggregate cost of fabrics (exclusive of all findings and trimmings) formed in the United States that were used in the production of all of those articles of that producer or that entity controlling production that are entered as articles described in § 10.243(a)(4) during the immediately preceding year was at least 75 percent of the aggregate declared customs value of the fabric (exclusive of all findings and trimmings) contained in all of those articles of that producer or that entity controlling production that are entered as articles described in § 10.243(a)(4) during that year; or
(ii) In a case in which the 75 percent requirement set forth in paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section was not met during a year and therefore those articles of that producer or that entity controlling production were not eligible for preferential treatment during the following year, the aggregate cost of fabrics (exclusive of all findings and trimmings) formed in the United States that were used in the production of all of those articles of that producer or that entity controlling production that conform to the production standards set forth in § 10.243(a)(4) and that were entered during the immediately preceding year was at least 85 percent of the aggregate declared customs value of the fabric (exclusive of all findings and trimmings) contained in all of those articles of that producer or that entity controlling production that conform to the production standards set forth in § 10.243(a)(4) and that were entered during that year; and
(iii) In conjunction with the filing of the claim for preferential treatment under § 10.245, the importer records on the entry summary or warehouse withdrawal for consumption (CBP Form 7501, column 34), or its electronic equivalent, the distinct and unique identifier assigned by CBP to the applicable documentation prescribed under paragraph (c) of this section.
(2) Rules of application—
(i) General. For purposes of paragraphs (b)(1)(i) and (b)(1)(ii) of this section and for purposes of preparing and filing the documentation prescribed in paragraph (c) of this section, the following rules will apply:
(A) The articles in question must have been produced in the manner specified in § 10.243(a)(4) and the articles in question must be entered within the same year;
(B) Articles that are exported to countries other than the United States and are never entered are not to be considered in determining compliance with the 75 or 85 percent standard specified in paragraph (b)(1)(i) or paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section;
(C) Articles that are entered under an HTSUS subheading other than the HTSUS subheading which pertains to articles described in § 10.243(a)(4) are not to be considered in determining compliance with the 75 percent standard specified in paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section;
(D) For purposes of determining compliance with the 85 percent standard specified in paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section, all articles that conform to the production standards set forth in § 10.243(a)(4) must be considered, regardless of the HTSUS subheading under which they were entered;
(E) Fabric components and fabrics that constitute findings or trimmings are not to be considered in determining compliance with the 75 or 85 percent standard specified in paragraph (b)(1)(i) or paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section;
(F) Beginning October 1, 2003, in order for articles to be eligible for preferential treatment in a given year, a producer of, or entity controlling production of, those articles must have met the 75 percent standard specified in paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section during the immediately preceding year. If articles of a producer or entity controlling production fail to meet the 75 percent standard specified in paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section during a year, articles of that producer or entity controlling production:
(1) Will not be eligible for preferential treatment during the following year;
(2) Will remain ineligible for preferential treatment until the year that follows a year in which articles of that producer or entity controlling production met the 85 percent standard specified in paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section; and
(3) After the 85 percent standard specified in paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section has been met, will again be subject to the 75 percent standard specified in paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section during the following year for purposes of determining eligibility for preferential treatment in the next year.
(G) A new producer or new entity controlling production, that is, a producer or entity controlling production who did not produce or control production of articles that were entered as articles described in § 10.243(a)(4) during the immediately preceding year, must first establish compliance with the 85 percent standard specified in paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section as a prerequisite to preparation of the declaration of compliance referred to in paragraph (c) of this section;
(H) A declaration of compliance prepared by a producer or by an entity controlling production must cover all production of that producer or all production that the entity controls for the year in question;
(I) A producer would not prepare a declaration of compliance if all of its production is covered by a declaration of compliance prepared by an entity controlling production;
(J) In the case of a producer, the 75 or 85 percent standard specified in paragraph (b)(1)(i) or paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section and the declaration of compliance procedure under paragraph (c) of this section apply to all articles of that producer for the year in question, even if some but not all of that production is also covered by a declaration of compliance prepared by an entity controlling production;
(K) The U.S. importer does not have to be the producer or the entity controlling production who prepared the declaration of compliance; and
(L) The exclusion references regarding findings and trimmings in paragraph (b)(1)(i) and paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section apply to all findings and trimmings, whether or not they are of foreign origin.
(ii) Examples. The following examples will illustrate application of the principles set forth in paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section.
Example 1.
An ATPDEA beneficiary country producer of articles that meet the production standards specified in § 10.243(a)(4) in the first year sends 50 percent of that production to ATPDEA region markets and the other 50 percent to the U.S. market; the cost of the fabrics formed in the United States equals 100 percent of the value of all of the fabric in the articles sent to the ATPDEA region and 60 percent of the value of all of the fabric in the articles sent to the United States. Although the cost of fabrics formed in the United States is more than 75 percent of the value of all of the fabric used in all of the articles produced, this producer could not prepare a valid declaration of compliance because the articles sent to the United States did not meet the minimum 75 percent standard.
Example 2.
A producer sends to the United States in the first year three shipments of articles that meet the description in § 10.243(a)(4); one of those shipments is entered under the HTSUS subheading that covers articles described in § 10.243(a)(4), the second shipment is entered under the HTSUS subheading that covers articles described in § 10.243(a)(7), and the third shipment is entered under subheading 9802.00.80, HTSUS. In determining whether the minimum 75 percent standard has been met in the first year for purposes of entry of articles under the HTSUS subheading that covers articles described in § 10.243(a)(4) during the following (that is, second) year, consideration must be restricted to the articles in the first shipment and therefore must not include the articles in the second and third shipments.
Example 3.
A producer in the second year begins production of articles that conform to the production standards specified in § 10.243(a)(4); some of those articles are entered in that year under HTSUS subheading 6212.10 and others under HTSUS subheading 9802.00.80 but none are entered in that year under the HTSUS subheading which pertains to articles described in § 10.243(a)(4) because the 75 percent standard had not been met in the preceding (that is, first) year. In this case the 85 percent standard applies, and all of the articles that were entered under the various HTSUS provisions in the second year must be taken into account in determining whether that 85 percent standard has been met. If the 85 percent was met in the aggregate for all of the articles entered in the second year, in the next (that is, third) year articles of that producer may receive preferential treatment under the HTSUS subheading which pertains to articles described in § 10.243(a)(4).
Example 4.
An entity controlling production of articles that meet the description in § 10.243(a)(4) buys for the U.S., Canadian and Mexican markets; the articles in each case are first sent to the United States where they are entered for consumption and then placed in a commercial warehouse from which they are shipped to various stores in the United States, Canada and Mexico. Notwithstanding the fact that some of the articles ultimately ended up in Canada or Mexico, a declaration of compliance prepared by the entity controlling production must cover all of the articles rather than only those that remained in the United States because all of those articles had been entered for consumption.
Example 5.
Fabric is cut and sewn in the United States with other U.S. materials to form cups which are joined together to form brassiere front subassemblies in the United States, and those front subassemblies are then placed in a warehouse in the United States where they are held until the following year; during that following year all of the front subassemblies are shipped to an ATPDEA beneficiary country where they are assembled with elastic strips for use as brassiere straps and labels produced in an Asian country and other fabrics, components or materials produced in the ATPDEA beneficiary country to form articles that meet the production standards specified in § 10.243(a)(4) and that are then shipped to the United States and entered during that same year. In determining whether the entered articles meet the minimum 75 or 85 percent standard, the fabric in the labels is to be disregarded entirely because the labels constitute findings or trimmings for purposes of this section, and all of the fabric in the front subassemblies is countable because it was all formed in the United States and used in the production of articles that were entered in the same year.
Example 6.
An ATPDEA beneficiary country producer's entire production of articles that meet the description in § 10.243(a)(4) is sent to a U.S. importer in two separate shipments, one in February and the other in June of the same calendar year; the articles shipped in February do not meet the minimum 75 percent standard, the articles shipped in June exceed the 85 percent standard, and the articles in the two shipments, taken together, do meet the 75 percent standard; the articles covered by the February shipment are entered for consumption on March 1 of that calendar year, and the articles covered by the June shipment are placed in a CBP bonded warehouse upon arrival and are subsequently withdrawn from warehouse for consumption on November 1 of that calendar year. The ATPDEA beneficiary country producer may not prepare a valid declaration of compliance covering the articles in the first shipment because those articles did not meet the minimum 75 percent standard and because those articles cannot be included with the articles of the second shipment on the same declaration of compliance since they were entered in a different year. However, the ATPDEA beneficiary country producer may prepare a valid declaration of compliance covering the articles in the second shipment because those articles did meet the requisite 85 percent standard which would apply for purposes of entry of articles in the following year.
Example 7.
A producer in the second year begins production of articles exclusively for the U.S. market that meet the production standards specified in § 10.243(a)(4), but the entered articles do not meet the requisite 85 percent standard until the third year. The producer's articles may not receive preferential treatment during the second year because there was no production (and thus there were no entered articles) in the immediately preceding (that is, first) year on which to assess compliance with the 75 percent standard. The producer's articles also may not receive preferential treatment during the third year because the 85 percent standard was not met in the immediately preceding (that is, second) year. However, the producer's articles are eligible for preferential treatment during the fourth year based on compliance with the 85 percent standard in the immediately preceding (that is, third) year.
Example 8.
An entity controlling production (Entity A) uses five ATPDEA beneficiary country producers (Producers 1-5), all of which produce only articles that meet the description in § 10.243(a)(4); Producers 1-4 send all of their production to the United States and Producer 5 sends 10 percent of its production to the United States and the rest to Europe; Producers 1-3 and Producer 5 produce only pursuant to contracts with Entity A, but Producer 4 also operates independently of Entity A by producing for several U.S. importers, one of which is an entity controlling production (Entity B) that also controls all of the production of articles of one other producer (Producer 6) which sends all of its production to the United States. A declaration of compliance prepared by Entity A must cover all of the articles of Producers 1-3 and the 10 percent of articles of Producer 5 that are sent to the United States and that portion of the articles of Producer 4 that are produced pursuant to the contract with Entity A, because Entity A controls the production of those articles. There is no need for Producers 1-3 and Producer 5 to prepare a declaration of compliance because they have no production that is not covered by a declaration of compliance prepared by an entity controlling production. A declaration of compliance prepared by Producer 4 would cover all of its production, that is, articles produced for Entity A, articles produced for Entity B, and articles produced independently for other U.S. importers; a declaration of compliance prepared by Entity B must cover that portion of the production of Producer 4 that it controls as well as all of the production of Producer 6 because Entity B also controls all of the production of Producer 6. Producer 6 would not prepare a declaration of compliance because all of its production is covered by the declaration of compliance prepared by Entity B.
(c) Documentation—
(1) Initial declaration of compliance. In order for an importer to comply with the requirement set forth in paragraph (b)(1)(iii) of this section, the producer or the entity controlling production must have filed with CBP, in accordance with paragraph (c)(4) of this section, a declaration of compliance with the applicable 75 or 85 percent requirement prescribed in paragraph (b)(1)(i) or (b)(1)(ii) of this section. After filing of the declaration of compliance has been completed, CBP will advise the producer or the entity controlling production of the distinct and unique identifier assigned to that declaration. The producer or the entity controlling production will then be responsible for advising each appropriate U.S. importer of that distinct and unique identifier for purposes of recording that identifier on the entry summary or warehouse withdrawal. In order to provide sufficient time for advising the U.S. importer of that distinct and unique identifier prior to the arrival of the articles in the United States, the producer or the entity controlling production should file the declaration of compliance with CBP at least 10 calendar days prior to the date of the first shipment of the articles to the United States.
(2) Amended declaration of compliance. If the information on the declaration of compliance referred to in paragraph (c)(1) of this section is based on an estimate because final year-end information was not available at that time and the final data differs from the estimate, or if the producer or the entity controlling production has reason to believe for any other reason that the declaration of compliance that was filed contained erroneous information, within 30 calendar days after the final year-end information becomes available or within 30 calendar days after the date of discovery of the error:
(i) The producer or the entity controlling production must file with the CBP office identified in paragraph (c)(4) of this section an amended declaration of compliance containing that final year-end information or other corrected information; or
(ii) If that final year-end information or other corrected information demonstrates noncompliance with the applicable 75 or 85 percent requirement, the producer or the entity controlling production must in writing advise both the CBP office identified in paragraph (c)(4) of this section and each appropriate U.S. importer of that fact.
(3) Form and preparation of declaration of compliance—
(i) Form. The declaration of compliance referred to in paragraph (c)(1) of this section may be printed and reproduced locally and must be in the following format:
Andean Trade Promotion and Drug Eradication Act Declaration of Compliance for Brassieres
[19 CFR 10.243(a)(4) and 10.248 ]
1. Year beginning date: October 1, ____________ Official U.S. CBP Use Only
Year ending date: September 30, ____________ Assigned number: ____________
Assignment date:____________
2. Identity of preparer (producer or entity controlling production):
Full name and address: Telephone number: ____________
Facsimile number: ____________
Importer identification number:______
3. If the preparer is an entity controlling production, provide the following for each producer:
Full name and address: ____________ Telephone number: ____________
Facsimile number: ____________
4. Aggregate cost of fabrics (exclusive of all findings and trimmings) formed in the United States that were used in the production of brassieres that were entered during the year:
____________
5. Aggregate declared customs value of the fabric (exclusive of all findings and trimmings) contained in brassieres that were entered during the year:
____________
6. I declare that the aggregate cost of fabric (exclusive of all findings and trimmings) formed in the United States was at least 75 percent (or 85 percent, if applicable under 19 CFR 10.248(b)(1)(ii)) of the aggregate declared customs value of the fabric contained in brassieres entered during the year.
7. Authorized signature:____________ 8. Name and title (print or type):____________
Date:
(ii) Preparation. The following rules will apply for purposes of completing the declaration of compliance set forth in paragraph (c)(3)(i) of this section:
(A) In block 1, fill in the year commencing October 1 and ending September 30 of the calendar year during which the applicable 75 or 85 percent standard specified in paragraph (b)(1)(i) or paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section was met;
(B) Block 2 should state the legal name and address (including country) of the preparer and should also include the preparer's importer identification number (see § 24.5 of this chapter), if the preparer has one;
(C) Block 3 should state the legal name and address (including country) of the ATPDEA beneficiary country producer if that producer is not already identified in block 2. If there is more than one producer, attach a list stating the legal name and address (including country) of all additional producers;
(D) Blocks 4 and 5 apply only to articles that were entered during the year identified in block 1; and
(E) In block 7, the signature must be that of an authorized officer, employee, agent or other person having knowledge of the relevant facts and the date must be the date on which the declaration of compliance was completed and signed.
(4) Filing of declaration of compliance. The declaration of compliance referred to in paragraph (c)(1) of this section:
(i) Must be completed either in the English language or in the language of the country in which the articles covered by the declaration were produced. If the declaration is completed in a language other than English, the producer or the entity controlling production must provide to CBP upon request a written English translation of the declaration; and
(ii) Must be filed with the New York Strategic Trade Center, Customs and Border Protection, 1 Penn Plaza, New York, New York 10119.
(d) Verification of declaration of compliance—
(1) Verification procedure. A declaration of compliance filed under this section will be subject to whatever verification CBP deems necessary. In the event that CBP for any reason is prevented from verifying the statements made on a declaration of compliance, CBP may deny any claim for preferential treatment made under § 10.245 that is based on that declaration. A verification of a declaration of compliance may involve, but need not be limited to, a review of:
(i) All records required to be made, kept, and made available to CBP by the importer, the producer, the entity controlling production, or any other person under part 163 of this chapter;
(ii) Documentation and other information regarding all articles that meet the production standards specified in § 10.243(a)(4) that were exported to the United States and that were entered during the year in question, whether or not a claim for preferential treatment was made under § 10.245. Those records and other information include, but are not limited to, work orders and other production records, purchase orders, invoices, bills of lading and other shipping documents;
(iii) Evidence to document the cost of fabrics formed in the United States that were used in the production of the articles in question, such as purchase orders, invoices, bills of lading and other shipping documents, and customs import and clearance documents, work orders and other production records, and inventory control records;
(iv) Evidence to document the cost or value of all fabric other than fabrics formed in the United States that were used in the production of the articles in question, such as purchase orders, invoices, bills of lading and other shipping documents, and customs import and clearance documents, work orders and other production records, and inventory control records; and
(v) Accounting books and documents to verify the records and information referred to in paragraphs (d)(1)(ii) through (d)(1)(iv) of this section. The verification of purchase orders, invoices and bills of lading will be accomplished through the review of a distinct audit trail. The audit trail documents must consist of a cash disbursement or purchase journal or equivalent records to establish the purchase of the fabric. The headings in each of these journals or other records must contain the date, vendor name, and amount paid for the fabric. The verification of production records and work orders will be accomplished through analysis of the inventory records of the producer or entity controlling production. The inventory records must reflect the production of the finished article which must be referenced to the original purchase order or lot number covering the fabric used in production. In the inventory production records, the inventory should show the opening balance of the inventory plus the purchases made during the accounting period and the inventory closing balance.
(2) Notice of determination. If, based on a verification of a declaration of compliance filed under this section, CBP determines that the applicable 75 or 85 percent standard specified in paragraph (b)(1)(i) or paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section was not met, CBP will publish a notice of that determination in the Federal Register.

Title 19 published on 2013-04-01

The following are only the Rules published in the Federal Register after the published date of Title 19.

For a complete list of all Rules, Proposed Rules, and Notices view the Rulemaking tab.

  • 2013-10-23; vol. 78 # 205 - Wednesday, October 23, 2013
    1. 78 FR 63052 - United States-Panama Trade Promotion Agreement
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, U.S. Customs and Border Protection
      Interim regulations; solicitation of comments.
      Interim rule effective October 23, 2013; comments must be received by December 23, 2013.
      19 CFR Parts 10, 24, 162, 163, and 178

This is a list of United States Code sections, Statutes at Large, Public Laws, and Presidential Documents, which provide rulemaking authority for this CFR Part.

This list is taken from the Parallel Table of Authorities and Rules provided by GPO [Government Printing Office].

It is not guaranteed to be accurate or up-to-date, though we do refresh the database weekly. More limitations on accuracy are described at the GPO site.


United States Code
U.S. Code: Title 15 - COMMERCE AND TRADE
U.S. Code: Title 19 - CUSTOMS DUTIES

§ 66 - Rules and forms prescribed by Secretary

§ 1202 - Harmonized Tariff Schedule

§ 1309 - Supplies for certain vessels and aircraft

§ 1313 - Drawback and refunds

§ 1317 - Tobacco products; supplies for certain vessels and aircraft

§ 1321 - Administrative exemptions

§ 1322 - International traffic and rescue work; United States-Mexico Boundary Treaty of 1970

§ 1401a - Value

§ 1402 - Repealed.

§ 1434 - Entry; vessels

§ 1435 - Repealed.

§ 1481 - Invoice; contents

§ 1484 - Entry of merchandise

§ 1486 - Administration of oaths

§ 1498 - Entry under regulations

§ 1508 - Recordkeeping

§ 1520 - Refunds and errors

§ 1557 - Entry for warehouse

§ 1623 - Bonds and other security

§ 1624 - General regulations

§ 2112 note - Barriers to and other distortions of trade

§ 2461 - Authority to extend preferences

§ 2462 - Designation of beneficiary developing countries

§ 2463 - Designation of eligible articles

§ 2464 - Review and report to Congress

§ 2465 - Date of termination

§ 2466 - Agricultural exports of beneficiary developing countries

§ 2466a - Designation of sub-Saharan African countries for certain benefits

§ 2466b - Termination of benefits for sub-Saharan African countries

§ 2467 - Definitions

§ 2501 - Short title

§ 2701 - Authority to grant duty-free treatment

§ 2702 - Beneficiary country

§ 2703 - Eligible articles

§ 2703a - Special rules for Haiti

19 U.S. Code § 2703a - Special rules for Haiti

§ 2704 - International Trade Commission reports on impact of Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Program

§ 2705 - Impact study by Secretary of Labor

§ 2706 - Effective date

§ 2707 - Center for the Study of Western Hemispheric Trade

§ 3203 - Eligible articles

§ 3314 - Implementing actions in anticipation of entry into force and initial regulations

§ 3592 - Rules of origin for textile and apparel products

§ 3721 - Treatment of certain textiles and apparel

§ 3805 - Implementation of trade agreements

§ 4001 note - Purposes

USC: Title 26a
Statutes at Large
Public Laws

Title 19 published on 2013-04-01

The following are ALL rules, proposed rules, and notices (chronologically) published in the Federal Register relating to 19 CFR 10 after this date.

  • 2013-10-23; vol. 78 # 205 - Wednesday, October 23, 2013
    1. 78 FR 63052 - United States-Panama Trade Promotion Agreement
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, U.S. Customs and Border Protection
      Interim regulations; solicitation of comments.
      Interim rule effective October 23, 2013; comments must be received by December 23, 2013.
      19 CFR Parts 10, 24, 162, 163, and 178