19 CFR 7.3 - Duty-free treatment of goods imported from insular possessions of the United States other than Puerto Rico.

§ 7.3 Duty-free treatment of goods imported from insular possessions of the United States other than Puerto Rico.
(a) General. Under the provisions of General Note 3(a)(iv), Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS), the following goods may be eligible for duty-free treatment when imported into the customs territory of the United States from an insular possession of the United States:
(1) Except as provided in Additional U.S. Note 5 to Chapter 91, HTSUS, and except as provided in Additional U.S. Note 2 to Chapter 96, HTSUS, and except as provided in section 423 of the Tax Reform Act of 1986, as amended (19 U.S.C. 2703 note), goods which are the growth or product of any such insular possession, and goods which were manufactured or produced in any such insular possession from materials that were the growth, product or manufacture of any such insular possession or of the customs territory of the United States, or of both, provided that such goods:
(i) Do not contain foreign materials valued at either more than 70 percent of the total value of the goods or, in the case of goods described in section 213(b) of the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (19 U.S.C. 2703(b)), more than 50 percent of the total value of the goods; and
(ii) Come to the customs territory of the United States directly from any such insular possession; and
(2) Goods previously imported into the customs territory of the United States with payment of all applicable duties and taxes imposed upon or by reason of importation, provided that:
(i) The goods were shipped from the United States directly to the insular possession and are returned from the insular possession to the United States by direct shipment; and
(ii) There was no remission, refund or drawback of such duties or taxes in connection with the shipment of the goods from the United States to the insular possession.
(b) Origin of goods. For purposes of this section, goods shall be considered to be the growth or product of, or manufactured or produced in, an insular possession if:
(1) The goods are wholly the growth or product of the insular possession; or
(2) The goods became a new and different article of commerce as a result of production or manufacture performed in the insular possession.
(c) Foreign materials. For purposes of this section, the term “foreign materials” covers any material incorporated in goods described in paragraph (b)(2) of this section other than:
(1) A material which was wholly the growth or product of an insular possession or of the customs territory of the United States;
(2) A material which was substantially transformed in an insular possession or in the customs territory of the United States into a new and different article of commerce which was then used in an insular possession in the production or manufacture of a new and different article which is shipped directly to the United States; or
(3) A material which may be imported into the customs territory of the United States from a foreign country and entered free of duty either:
(i) At the time the goods which incorporate the material are entered; or
(ii) At the time the material is imported into the insular possession, provided that the material was incorporated into the goods during the 18-month period after the date on which the material was imported into the insular possession.
(d) Foreign materials value limitation. For purposes of this section, the determination of whether goods contain foreign materials valued at more than 70 or 50 percent of the total value of the goods shall be made based on a comparison between:
(1) The landed cost of the foreign materials, consisting of:
(i) The manufacturer's actual cost for the materials or, where a material is provided to the manufacturer without charge or at less than fair market value, the sum of all expenses incurred in the growth, production, or manufacture of the material, including general expenses, plus an amount for profit; and
(ii) The cost of transporting those materials to the insular possession, but excluding any duties or taxes assessed on the materials by the insular possession and any charges which may accrue after landing; and
(2) The final appraised value of the goods imported into the customs territory of the United States, as determined in accordance with section 402 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1401a).
(e) Direct shipment—
(1) General. For purposes of this section, goods shall be considered to come to the United States directly from an insular possession, or to be shipped from the United States directly to an insular possession and returned from the insular possession to the United States by direct shipment, only if:
(i) The goods proceed directly to or from the insular possession without passing through any foreign territory or country;
(ii) The goods proceed to or from the insular possession through a foreign territory or country, the goods do not enter into the commerce of the foreign territory or country while en route to the insular possession or the United States, and the invoices, bills of lading, and other shipping documents show the insular possession or the United States as the final destination; or
(iii) The goods proceed to or from the insular possession through a foreign territory or country, the invoices and other shipping documents do not show the insular possession or the United States as the final destination, and the goods:
(A) Remained under the control of the customs authority of the foreign territory or country;
(B) Did not enter into the commerce of the foreign territory or country except for the purpose of sale other than at retail, and the port director is satisfied that the importation into the insular possession or the United States results from the original commercial transaction between the importer and the producer or the latter's sales agent; and
(C) Were not subjected to operations in the foreign territory or country other than loading and unloading and other activities necessary to preserve the goods in good condition.
(2) Evidence of direct shipment. The port director may require that appropriate shipping papers, invoices, or other documents be submitted within 60 days of the date of entry as evidence that the goods were shipped to the United States directly from an insular possession or shipped from the United States directly to an insular possession and returned from the insular possession to the United States by direct shipment within the meaning of paragraph (e)(1) of this section, and such evidence of direct shipment shall be subject to such verification as deemed necessary by the port director. Evidence of direct shipment shall not be required when the port director is otherwise satisfied, taking into consideration the kind and value of the merchandise, that the goods qualify for duty-free treatment under General Note 3(a)(iv), HTSUS, and paragraph (a) of this section.
(f) Documentation.
(1) When goods are sought to be admitted free of duty as provided in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, there shall be filed with the entry/entry summary a properly completed certificate of origin on CBP Form 3229, signed by the chief or assistant chief customs officer or other official responsible for customs administration at the port of shipment, showing that the goods comply with the requirements for duty-free entry set forth in paragraph (a)(1) of this section. Except in the case of goods which incorporate a material described in paragraph (c)(3)(ii) of this section, a certificate of origin shall not be required for any shipment eligible for informal entry under § 143.21 of this chapter or in any case where the port director is otherwise satisfied that the goods qualify for duty-free treatment under paragraph (a)(1) of this section.
(2) When goods in a shipment not eligible for informal entry under § 143.21 of this chapter are sought to be admitted free of duty as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, the following declarations shall be filed with the entry/entry summary unless the port director is satisfied by reason of the nature of the goods or otherwise that the goods qualify for such duty-free entry:
(i) A declaration by the shipper in the insular possession in substantially the following form:
I, __________ (name) of __________ (organization) do hereby declare that to the best of my knowledge and belief the goods identified below were sent directly from the United States on ______, 19__, to __________ (name) of __________ (organization) on __________ (insular possession) via the __________ (name of carrier) and that the goods remained in said insular possession until shipped by me directly to the United States via the __________ (name of carrier) on ______, 19__.
Marks Numbers Quantity Description Value
Dated at ________, this ____ day of ______, 19__.
Signature:
(ii) A declaration by the importer in the United States in substantially the following form:
I, __________ (name), of __________ (organization) declare that the (above) (attached) declaration by the shipper in the insular possession is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief, that the goods in question were previously imported into the customs territory of the United States and were shipped to the insular possession from the United States without remission, refund or drawback of any duties or taxes paid in connection with that prior importation, and that the goods arrived in the United States directly from the insular possession via the __________ (name of carrier) on ______, 19__.
(Date)
(Signature)
(g) Warehouse withdrawals; drawback. Merchandise may be withdrawn from a bonded warehouse under section 557 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1557), for shipment to any insular possession of the United States other than Puerto Rico without payment of duty, or with a refund of duty if the duties have been paid, in like manner as for exportation to foreign countries. No drawback may be allowed under section 313 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1313), on goods manufactured or produced in the United States and shipped to any insular possession. No drawback of internal-revenue tax is allowable under 19 U.S.C. 1313 on goods manufactured or produced in the United States with the use of domestic tax-paid alcohol and shipped to Wake Island, Midway Islands or Johnston Atoll.
[T.D. 97-75, 62 FR 46439, Sept. 3, 1997, as amended by CBP Dec. 08-25, 73 FR 40725, July 16, 2008]

Title 19 published on 2014-04-01

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