19 CFR Part 181, Appendix to Part 181 - Rules of Origin Regulations

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View PDF at GPO Pt. 181, App.
Appendix to Part 181—Rules of Origin Regulations
SECTION 1. CITATION
This appendix may be cited as the NAFTA Rules of Origin Regulations.
PART I
SECTION 2. DEFINITIONS AND INTERPRETATION
Definitions
(1) For purposes of this appendix,
“accessories, spare parts or tools that are delivered with a good and form part of the good's standard accessories, spare parts or tools” means goods that are delivered with a good, whether or not they are physically affixed to that good, and that are used for the transport, protection, maintenance or cleaning of the good, for instruction in the assembly, repair or use of that good, or as replacements for consumable or interchangeable parts of that good;
“adjusted to an F.O.B. basis” means, with respect to a good, adjusted by
(a) deducting
(i) the costs of transporting the good after it is shipped from the point of direct shipment,
(ii) the costs of unloading, loading, handling and insurance that are associated with that transportation, and
(iii) the cost of packing materials and containers,
where those costs are included in the transaction value of the good, and
(b) adding
(i) the costs of transporting the good from the place of production to the point of direct shipment,
(ii) the costs of loading, unloading, handling and insurance that are associated with that transportation, and
(iii) the costs of loading the good for shipment at the point of direct shipment,
where those costs are not included in the transaction value of the good;
“Agreement” means the North American Free Trade Agreement;
“applicable change in tariff classification” means, with respect to a non-originating material used in the production of a good, a change in tariff classification specified in a rule set out in Schedule I for the tariff provision under which the good is classified;
“automotive component” means a good that is referred to in column I of an item of Schedule V;
“automotive component assembly” means a good, other than a heavy-duty vehicle, that incorporates an automotive component;
“costs incurred in packing” means, with respect to a good or material, the value of the packing materials and containers in which the good or material is packed for shipment and the labor costs incurred in packing it for shipment, but does not include the costs of preparing and packaging it for retail sale;
“customs value” means
(a) in the case of Canada, value for duty as defined in the Customs Act, except that for purposes of determining that value the reference in section 55 of that Act to “in accordance with the regulations made under the Currency Act” shall be read as a reference to “in accordance with subsection 3(1) of these Regulations”,
(b) in the case of Mexico, the valor en aduana as determined in accordance with the Ley Aduanera, converted, in the event such value is not expressed in Mexican currency, to Mexican currency at the rate of exchange determined in accordance with subsection 3(1) of these Regulations, and
(c) in the case of the United States, the value of imported merchandise as determined by the Customs Service in accordance with section 402 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, converted, in the event such value is not expressed in United States currency, to United States currency at the rate of exchange determined in accordance with subsection 3(1) of these Regulations.
“days” means calendar days, and includes weekends and holidays;
“direct labor costs” means costs, including fringe benefits, that are associated with employees who are directly involved in the production of a good;
“direct material costs” means the value of materials, other than indirect materials and packing materials and containers, that are used in the production of a good;
“direct overhead” means costs, other than direct material costs and direct labor costs, that are directly associated with the production of a good;
“enterprise” means any entity constituted or organized under applicable laws, whether or not for profit and whether privately owned or governmentally owned, including any corporation, trust, partnership, sole proprietorship, joint venture or other association;
“excluded costs” means sales promotion, marketing and after-sales service costs, royalties, shipping and packing costs and non-allowable interest costs;
“fungible goods” means goods that are interchangeable for commercial purposes and the properties of which are essentially identical;
“fungible materials” means materials that are interchangeable for commercial purposes and the properties of which are essentially identical;
“Harmonized System” means the Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System, including its General Rules of Interpretation, Section Notes and Chapter Notes, as set out in
(a) in the case of Canada, the Customs Tariff,
(b) in the case of Mexico, the Tarifa de la Ley del Impuesto General de Importación, and
(c) in the case of the United States, the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States;
“heavy-duty vehicle” means a motor vehicle provided for in any of heading 8701, tariff items 8702.10.30 and 8702.90.30 (vehicles for the transport of 16 or more persons), subheadings 8704.10, 8704.22, 8704.23, 8704.32 and 8704.90 and heading 8705 and 8706;
“identical goods” means, with respect to a good, goods that
(a) are the same in all respects as that good, including physical characteristics, quality and reputation but excluding minor differences in appearance,
(b) were produced in the same country as that good, and
(c) were produced
(i) by the producer of that good, or
(ii) by another producer, where no goods that satisfy the requirements of paragraphs (a) and (b) were produced by the producer of that good;
“identical materials” means, with respect to a material, materials that
(a) are the same as that material in all respects, including physical characteristics, quality and reputation but excluding minor differences in appearance,
(b) were produced in the same country as that material, and
(c) were produced
(i) by the producer of that material, or
(ii) by another producer, where no materials that satisfy the requirements of paragraphs (a) and (b) were produced by the producer of that material;
“incorporated” means, with respect to the production of a good, a material that is physically incorporated into that good, and includes a material that is physically incorporated into another material before that material or any subsequently produced material is used in the production of the good;
“indirect material” means a good used in the production, testing or inspection of a good but not physically incorporated into the good, or a good used in the maintenance of buildings or the operation of equipment associated with the production of a good, and includes
(a) fuel and energy,
(b) tools, dies and molds,
(c) spare parts and materials used in the maintenance of equipment and buildings,
(d) lubricants, greases, compounding materials and other materials used in production or used to operate equipment and buildings,
(e) gloves, glasses, footwear, clothing, safety equipment and supplies,
(f) equipment, devices and supplies used for testing or inspecting the other goods,
(g) catalysts and solvents, and
(h) any other goods that are not incorporated into the good but the use of which in the production of the good can reasonably be demonstrated to be part of that production;
“interest costs” means all costs paid or payable by a person to whom credit is, or is to be advanced, for the advancement of credit or the obligation to advance credit;
“intermediate material” means a self-produced material that is used in the production of a good and is designated as an intermediate material under section 7(4) ;
“light-duty automotive good” means a light-duty vehicle or a good of a tariff provision listed in Schedule IV that is subject to a regional value-content requirement and is for use as original equipment in the production of a light-duty vehicle;
“light-duty vehicle” means a motor vehicle provided for in any of tariff items 8702.10.60 and 8702.90.60 (vehicles for the transport of 15 or fewer persons) and subheadings 8703.21 through 8703.90, 8704.21 and 8704.31;
“listed material” means a good that is referred to in column II of an item of Schedule V;
“location of the producer” means,
(a) where the warehouse or other receiving station at which a producer receives materials for use by the producer in the production of a good is located within a radius of 75 km (46.60 miles) from the place at which the producer produces the good, the location of that warehouse or other receiving station, and
(b) in any other case, the place at which the producer produces the good in which a material is to be used;
“material” means a good that is used in the production of another good, and includes a part or ingredient;
“motor vehicle assembler” means a producer of motor vehicles and any related person with whom, or joint venture in which, the producer participates with respect to the production of motor vehicles;
“month” means a calendar month;
“NAFTA country” means a Party to the Agreement;
“national” means a natural person who is a citizen or permanent resident of a NAFTA country, and includes
(a) with respect to Mexico, a national or citizen according to Articles 30 and 34, respectively, of the Mexican Constitution, and
(b) with respect to the United States, a “national of the United States” as defined in the Immigration and Nationality Act on the date of entry into force of the Agreement;
“net cost method” means the method of calculating the regional value content of a good that is set out in section 6(3);
“non-allowable interest costs” means interest costs incurred by a producer on the producer's debt obligations that are more than 700 basis points above the yield on debt obligations of comparable maturities issued by the federal government of the country in which the producer is located;
“non-originating good” means a good that does not qualify as originating under this appendix;
“non-originating material” means a material that does not qualify as originating under this appendix;
“original equipment” means a material that is incorporated into a motor vehicle before the first transfer of title or consignment of the motor vehicle to a person who is not a motor vehicle assembler, and that is
(a) a good of a tariff provision listed in Schedule IV, or
(b) an automotive component assembly, automotive component, sub-component or listed material;
“originating good” means a good that qualifies as originating under this appendix;
“originating material” means a material that qualifies as originating under this appendix;
“other costs,” with respect to total cost, means all costs that are not product costs or period costs;
“packaging materials and containers” means materials and containers in which a good is packaged for retail sale;
“packing materials and containers” means materials and containers that are used to protect a good during transportation, but does not include packaging materials and containers;
“payments” means, with respect to royalties and sales promotion, marketing and after-sales service costs, the costs expensed on the books of a producer, whether or not an actual payment is made;
“period costs” means costs, other than product costs, that are expensed in the period in which they are incurred;
“person” means a natural person or an enterprise;
“person of a NAFTA country” means a national, or an enterprise constituted or organized under the laws of a NAFTA country;
“point of direct shipment” means the location from which a producer of a good normally ships that good to the buyer of the good;
“producer” means a person who grows, mines, harvests, fishes, traps, hunts, manufactures, processes or assembles a good;
“product costs” means costs that are associated with the production of a good, and includes the value of materials, direct labor costs and direct overhead;
“production” means growing, mining, harvesting, fishing, trapping, hunting, manufacturing, processing or assembling a good;
“related person” means a person related to another person on the basis that
(a) they are officers or directors of one another's businesses,
(b) they are legally recognized partners in business,
(c) they are employer and employee,
(d) any person directly or indirectly owns, controls or holds 25 percent or more of the outstanding voting stock or shares of each of them,
(e) one of them directly or indirectly controls the other,
(f) both of them are directly or indirectly controlled by a third person, or
(g) they are members of the same family (members of the same family are natural or adopted children, brothers, sisters, parents, grandparents, or spouses);
“reusable scrap or by-product” means waste and spoilage that is generated by the producer of a good and that is used in the production of a good or sold by that producer;
“right to use,” for purposes of the definition of royalties, includes the right to sell or distribute a good;
“royalties” means payments of any kind, including payments under technical assistance agreements or similar agreements, made as consideration for the use of, or right to use, any copyright, literary, artistic, or scientific work, patent, trademark, design, model, plan, secret formula or process, excluding those payments under technical assistance agreements or similar agreements that can be related to specific services such as
(a) personnel training, without regard to where performed, and
(b) if performed in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries, engineering, tooling, die-setting, software design and similar computer services, or other services;
“sales promotion, marketing and after-sales service costs” means the following costs related to sales promotion, marketing and after-sales service:
(a) sales and marketing promotion; media advertising; advertising and market research; promotional and demonstration materials; exhibits; sales conferences, trade shows and conventions; banners; marketing displays; free samples; sales, marketing and after-sales service literature (product brochures, catalogs, technical literature, price lists, service manuals, sales aid information); establishment and protection of logos and trademarks; sponsorships; wholesale and retail restocking charges; entertainment;
(b) sales and marketing incentives; consumer, retailer or wholesaler rebates; merchandise incentives;
(c) salaries and wages, sales commissions, bonuses, benefits (for example, medical, insurance, pension), traveling and living expenses, membership and professional fees, for sales promotion, marketing and after-sales service personnel;
(d) recruiting and training of sales promotion, marketing and after-sales service personnel, and after-sales training of customers' employees, where such costs are identified separately for sales promotion, marketing and after-sales service of goods on the financial statements or cost accounts of the producer;
(e) product liability insurance;
(f) office supplies for sales promotion, marketing and after-sales service of goods, where such costs are identified separately for sales promotion, marketing and after-sales service of goods on the financial statements or cost accounts of the producer;
(g) telephone, mail and other communications, where such costs are identified separately for sales promotion, marketing and after-sales service of goods on the financial statements or cost accounts of the producer;
(h) rent and depreciation of sales promotion, marketing and after-sales service offices and distribution centers;
(i) property insurance premiums, taxes, cost of utilities, and repair and maintenance of sales promotion, marketing and after-sales service offices and distribution centers, where such costs are identified separately for sales promotion, marketing and after-sales service of goods on the financial statements or cost accounts of the producer; and
(j) payments by the producer to other persons for warranty repairs;
“self-produced material” means a material that is produced by the producer of a good and used in the production of that good;
“shipping and packing costs” means the costs incurred in packing a good for shipment and shipping the good from the point of direct shipment to the buyer, excluding the costs of preparing and packaging the good for retail sale;
“similar goods” means, with respect to a good, goods that
(a) although not alike in all respects to that good, have similar characteristics and component materials that enable the goods to perform the same functions and to be commercially interchangeable with that good,
(b) were produced in the same country as that good, and
(c) were produced
(i) by the producer of that good, or
(ii) by another producer, where no goods that satisfy the requirements of paragraphs (a) and (b) were produced by the producer of that good;
“similar materials” means, with respect to a material, materials that
(a) although not alike in all respects to that material, have similar characteristics and component materials that enable the materials to perform the same functions and to be commercially interchangeable with that material,
(b) were produced in the same country as that material, and (c) were produced
(i) by the producer of that material, or
(ii) by another producer, where no materials that satisfy the requirements of paragraphs (a) and (b) were produced by the producer of that material;
“subject to a regional value-content requirement” means, with respect to a good, that the provisions of this appendix that are applied to determine whether the good is an originating good include a regional value-content requirement;
“sub-component” means a good that comprises a listed material and one or more other materials or listed materials;
“tariff provision” means a heading, subheading or tariff item;
“territory” means, with respect to
(a) Canada, the territory to which its customs laws apply, including any areas beyond the territorial seas of Canada within which, in accordance with international law and its domestic law, Canada may exercise rights with respect to the seabed and subsoil and their natural resources,
(b) Mexico,
(i) the states of the Federation and the Federal District,
(ii) the islands, including the reefs and keys, in adjacent seas,
(iii) the islands of Guadalupe and Revillagigedo situated in the Pacific Ocean,
(iv) the continental shelf and the submarine shelf of such islands, keys and reefs,
(v) the waters of the territorial seas, in accordance with international law, and its interior maritime waters,
(vi) the space located above the national territory, in accordance with international law, and
(vii) any areas beyond the territorial seas of Mexico within which, in accordance with international law, including the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, and its domestic law, Mexico may exercise rights with respect to the seabed and subsoil and their natural resources, and
(c) the United States,
(i) the customs territory of the United States, which includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico,
(ii) the foreign trade zones located in the United States and Puerto Rico, and
(iii) any areas beyond the territorial seas of the United States within which, in accordance with international law and its domestic law, the United States may exercise rights with respect to the seabed and subsoil and their natural resources;
“total cost” means the total of all product costs, period costs and other costs incurred in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries;
“transaction value method” means the method of calculating the regional value content of a good that is set out in subsection 6(2);
“used” means used or consumed in the production of a good;
“verification of origin” means a verification of origin of goods under
(a) in the case of Canada, paragraph 42.1(1)(a) or subsection 42.2(2) of the Customs Act,
(b) in the case of Mexico, Article 506 of the Agreement, and
(c) in the case of the United States, section 509 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended.
Interpretation: “similar”
(2) For purposes of the definitions of “similar goods” and “similar materials,” the quality of the goods or materials, their reputation and the existence of a trademark are among the factors to be considered for purposes of determining whether goods or materials are similar.
Interpretation: terms used to refer to HTSUS; use of term “books”
(3) For purposes of this appendix,
(a) “chapter,” unless otherwise indicated, refers to a chapter of the Harmonized System;
(b) “heading” refers to any four-digit number, or the first four digits of any number, set out in the column “Heading/Subheading” in the Harmonized System;
(c) “subheading” refers to any six-digit number, or the first six digits of any number, set out in the column “Heading/Subheading” in the Harmonized System;
(d) “tariff item” refers to any eight-digit number set out in the column “Heading/Subheading” in the Harmonized System;
(e) any reference to a tariff item in Chapter Four of the Agreement or this appendix that includes letters shall be reflected as the appropriate eight-digit number in the Harmonized System as implemented in each NAFTA country; and
(f) “books” refers to,
(i) with respect to the books of a person who is located in a NAFTA country,
(A) books and other documents that support the recording of revenues, expenses, costs, assets and liabilities and that are maintained in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles set out in the publications listed in Schedule XII with respect to the territory of the NAFTA country in which the person is located, and
(B) financial statements, including note disclosures, that are prepared in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles set out in the publications listed in Schedule XII with respect to the territory of the NAFTA country in which the person is located, and
(ii) with respect to the books of a person who is located outside the territories of the NAFTA countries,
(A) books and other documents that support the recording of revenues, expenses, costs, assets and liabilities and that are maintained in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles applied in that location or, where there are no such principles, in accordance with the International Accounting Standards, and
(B) financial statements, including note disclosures, that are prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles applied in that location or, where there are no such principles, in accordance with the International Accounting Standards.
Use of Examples to illustrate the application of a provision
(4) Where an example, referred to as an “Example,” is set out in this appendix, the example is for purposes of illustrating the application of a provision, and where there is any inconsistency between the example and the provision, the provision prevails to the extent of the inconsistency.
References to domestic laws
(5) Except as otherwise provided, references in this appendix to domestic laws of the NAFTA countries apply to those laws as they may be amended or superseded.
Calculation of total cost
(6) For purposes of sections 5(9), 6(11) and 7(6) and sections 10(1)(a) (i) and (ii),
(a) total cost consists of all product costs, period costs and other costs that are recorded, except as otherwise provided in paragraphs (b) (i) and (ii), on the books of the producer without regard to the location of the persons to whom payments with respect to those costs are made;
(b) in calculating total cost,
(i) the value of materials, other than intermediate materials, indirect materials and packing materials and containers, shall be the value determined in accordance with section 7(1),
(ii) the value of intermediate materials used in the production of the good or material with respect to which total cost is being calculated shall be calculated in accordance with section 7(6),
(iii) the value of indirect materials and the value of packing materials and containers shall be the costs that are recorded on the books of the producer for those materials, and
(iv) product costs, period costs and other costs, other than costs referred to in subparagraphs (i) and (ii), shall be the costs thereof that are recorded on the books of the producer for those costs;
(c) total cost does not include profits that are earned by the producer, regardless of whether they are retained by the producer or paid out to other persons as dividends, or taxes paid on those profits, including capital gains taxes;
(d) gains related to currency conversion that are related to the production of the good shall be deducted from total cost, and losses related to currency conversion that are related to the production of the good shall be included in total cost;
(e) the value of materials with respect to which production is accumulated under section 14 shall be determined in accordance with that section; and
(f) total cost includes the impact of inflation as recorded on the books of the producer, if recorded in accordance with the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles of the producer's country.
(7) For purposes of calculating total cost under sections 5(9) and 7(6) and sections 10(1)(a) (i) and (ii),
(a) where the regional value content of the good is calculated on the basis of the net cost method and the producer has chosen under section 6(15), 11 (1), (3) or (6), 12(5) or 13(4) to calculate the regional value content over a period, the total cost shall be calculated over that period; and
(b) in any other case, the producer may choose that the total cost be calculated over
(i) a month,
(ii) any consecutive three month or six month period that falls within and is evenly divisible into the number of months of the producer's fiscal year remaining at the beginning of that period, or
(iii) the producer's fiscal year.
(8) A choice made under subsection (7) may not be rescinded or modified with respect to the good or material, or the period, with respect to which the choice is made.
(9) Where a producer chooses a one, three or six month period under subsec-tion (7) with respect to a good or material, the producer shall be considered to have chosen under that subsection a period or periods of the same duration for the remainder of the producer's fiscal year with respect to that good or material.
(10) With respect to a good exported to a NAFTA country, a choice to average is considered to have been made
(a) in the case of a choice referred to in section 11 (1), (3) or (6) or 13(4), if the choice is received by the customs administration of that NAFTA country; and
(b) in the case of a choice referred to in section 2(7), 6(15) or 12(1), if the customs administration of that NAFTA country is informed in writing during the course of a verification of the origin of the good that the choice has been made.
SECTION 3. CURRENCY CONVERSION
(1) Where the value of a good or a material is expressed in a currency other than the currency of the country in which the producer of the good is located, that value shall be converted to the currency of the country in which that producer is located on the basis of
(a) in the case of the sale of that good or the purchase of that material, the rate of exchange used by the producer for purposes of recording that sale or purchase, as the case may be; and
(b) in the case of a material that is acquired by the producer other than by a purchase,
(i) where the producer used a rate of exchange for purposes of recording another transaction in that other currency that occurred within 30 days of the date on which the producer acquired the material, that rate, and
(ii) in any other case,
(A) with respect to a producer located in Canada, the rate of exchange referred to in section 5 of the Currency Exchange for Customs Valuation Regulations for the date on which the material was shipped directly to the producer,
(B) with respect to a producer located in Mexico, the rate of exchange published by the Banco de Mexico in the Diario Oficial de la Federacion, under the title “TIPO de cambio para solventar obligaciones denominadas en moneda extranjera pagaderas en la Republica Mexicana”, for the date on which the material was shipped directly to the producer, and
(C) with respect to a producer located in the United States, the rate of exchange referred to in 31 U.S.C. 5151 for the date on which the material was shipped directly to the producer.
(2) Where a producer of a good has a statement referred to in section 9, 10 or 14 that includes information in a currency other than the currency of the country in which that producer is located, the currency shall be converted to the currency of the country in which the producer is located on the basis of
(a) if the material was purchased by the producer in the same currency as the currency in which the information in the statement is provided, the rate of exchange used by the producer for purposes of recording the purchase;
(b) if the material was purchased by the producer in a currency other than the currency in which the information in the statement is provided,
(i) where the producer used a rate of exchange for purposes of recording a transaction in that other currency that occurred within 30 days of the date on which the producer acquired the material, that rate, and
(ii) in any other case,
(A) with respect to a producer located in Canada, the rate of exchange referred to in section 5 of the Currency Exchange for Customs Valuation Regulations for the date on which the material was shipped directly to the producer,
(B) with respect to a producer located in Mexico, the rate of exchange published by the Banco de Mexico in the Diario Oficial de la Federacion, under the title “TIPO de cambio para solventar obligaciones denominadas en moneda extranjera pagaderas en la Republica Mexicana”, for the date on which the material was shipped directly to the producer, and
(C) with respect to a producer located in the United States, the rate of exchange referred to in 31 U.S.C. 5151 for the date on which the material was shipped directly to the producer; and
(c) if the material was acquired by the producer other than by a purchase,
(i) where the producer used a rate of exchange for purposes of recording a transaction in that other currency that occurred within 30 days of the date on which the producer acquired the material, that rate, and
(ii) in any other case,
(A) with respect to a producer located in Canada, the rate of exchange referred to in section 5 of the Currency Exchange for Customs Valuation Regulations for the date on which the material was shipped directly to the producer,
(B) with respect to a producer located in Mexico, the rate of exchange published by the Banco de Mexico in the Diario Oficial de la Federacion, under the title “TIPO de cambio para solventar obligaciones denominadas en moneda extranjera pagaderas en la Republica Mexicana”, for the date on which the material was shipped directly to the producer, and
(C) with respect to a producer located in the United States, the rate of exchange referred to in 31 U.S.C. 5151 for the date on which the material was shipped directly to the producer.
PART II
SECTION 4. ORIGINATING GOODS
Identification of goods which are “wholly obtained or produced”
(1) A good originates in the territory of a NAFTA country where the good is
(a) a mineral good extracted in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries;
(b) a vegetable or other good harvested in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries;
(c) a live animal born and raised in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries;
(d) a good obtained from hunting, trapping or fishing in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries;
(e) fish, shellfish or other marine life taken from the sea by a vessel registered or recorded with a NAFTA country and flying its flag;
(f) a good produced on board a factory ship from a good referred to in paragraph (e), where the factory ship is registered or recorded with the same NAFTA country as the vessel that took that good and flies that country's flag;
(g) a good taken by a NAFTA country or a person of a NAFTA country from or beneath the seabed outside the territorial waters of that country, where a NAFTA country has the right to exploit that seabed;
(h) a good taken from outer space, where the good is obtained by a NAFTA country or a person of a NAFTA country and is not processed outside the territories of the NAFTA countries;
(i) waste and scrap derived from
(i) production in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries, or
(ii) used goods collected in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries, where those goods are fit only for the recovery of raw materials; or
(j) a good produced in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries exclusively from a good referred to in any of paragraphs (a) through (i), or from the derivatives of such a good, at any stage of production.
Goods made from non-originating materials: change in tariff classification requirement; regional value-content requirement
(2) A good originates in the territory of a NAFTA country where
(a) each of the non-originating materials used in the production of the good undergoes the applicable change in tariff classification as a result of production that occurs entirely in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries, where the applicable rule in Schedule I for the tariff provision under which the good is classified specifies only a change in tariff classification, and the good satisfies all other applicable requirements of this appendix;
(b) each of the non-originating materials used in the production of the good undergoes the applicable change in tariff classification as a result of production that occurs entirely in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries and the good satisfies the applicable regional value-content requirement, where the applicable rule in Schedule I for the tariff provision under which the good is classified specifies both a change in tariff classification and a regional value-content requirement, and the good satisfies all other applicable requirements of this appendix; or
(c) the good satisfies the applicable regional value-content requirement, where the applicable rule in Schedule I for the tariff provision under which the good is classified specifies only a regional value-content requirement, and the good satisfies all other applicable requirements of this appendix.
Goods made exclusively from originating materials
(3) A good originates in the territory of a NAFTA country where the good is produced entirely in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries exclusively from originating materials.
Exceptions to the change in tariff classification requirement
(4) A good originates in the territory of a NAFTA country where
(a) except in the case of a good provided for in any of Chapters 61 through 63,
(i) the good is produced entirely in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries,
(ii) one or more of the non-originating materials used in the production of the good do not undergo an applicable change in tariff classification because the materials were imported together, whether or not with originating materials, into the territory of a NAFTA country as an unassembled or disassembled good, and were classified as an assembled good pursuant to Rule 2(a) of the General Rules for the Interpretation of the Harmonized System,
(iii) the regional value content of the good, calculated in accordance with section 6, is not less than 60 percent where the transaction value method is used, or is not less than 50 percent where the net cost method is used, and
(iv) the good satisfies all other applicable requirements of this appendix, including any applicable, higher regional value-content requirement provided for in section 13 or Schedule I; or
(b) except in the case of a good provided for in any of Chapters 61 through 63,
(i) the good is produced entirely in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries,
(ii) one or more of the non-originating materials used in the production of the good do not undergo an applicable change in tariff classification because
(A) those materials are provided for under the Harmonized System as parts of the good, and
(B) the heading for the good provides for both the good and its parts and is not further subdivided into subheadings, or the subheading for the good provides for both the good and its parts,
(iii) the non-originating materials that do not undergo a change in tariff classification in the circumstances described in subparagraph (ii) and the good are not both classified as parts of goods under the heading or subheading referred to in subparagraph (ii)(B),
(iv) each of the non-originating materials that is used in the production of the good and is not referred to in subparagraph (iii) undergoes an applicable change in tariff classification or satisfies any other applicable requirement set out in Schedule I,
(v) the regional value content of the good, calculated in accordance with section 6, is not less than 60 percent where the transaction value method is used, or is not less than 50 percent where the net cost method is used, and
(vi) the good satisfies all other applicable requirements of this appendix, including any applicable, higher regional value-content requirement provided for in section 13 or Schedule I.
Interpretation: heading or subheading which provides for both a good and parts of the good
(5) For purposes of subsection (4)(b),
(a) the determination of whether a heading or subheading provides for a good and its parts shall be made on the basis of the nomenclature of the heading or subheading and the relevant Section or Chapter Notes, in accordance with the General Rules for the Interpretation of the Harmonized System; and
(b) where, in accordance with the Harmonized System, a heading includes parts of goods by application of a Section Note or Chapter Note of the Harmonized System and the subheadings under that heading do not include a subheading designated “Parts”, a subheading designated “Other” under that heading shall be considered to cover only the goods and parts of the goods that are themselves classified under that subheading.
(6) For purposes of subsection (2), where Schedule I sets out two or more alternative rules for the tariff provision under which a good is classified, if the good satisfies the requirements of one of those rules, it need not satisfy the requirements of another of the rules in order to qualify as an originating good.
Special rule for certain goods
(7) A good originates in the territory of a NAFTA country if the good is referred to in Table 308.1.1 of Section B of Annex 308.1 to Chapter Three of the Agreement and is imported from the territory of a NAFTA country at a time when the NAFTA countries' most-favored-nation rate of duty for that good is in accordance with paragraph 1 of Section A of that Annex.
Self-produced material may be a material for determining applicability of rules of origin
(8) For purposes of determining whether non-originating materials undergo an applicable change in tariff classification, a self-produced material may, at the choice of the producer of a good into which the self-produced material is incorporated, be considered as an originating material or non-originating material, as the case may be, used in the production of that good.
(9) The following example is an “Example” as referred to in section 2(4).
Example:section 4(8), Self-produced Materials as Materials for Purposes of Determining Whether Non-originating Materials Undergo an Applicable Change in Tariff Classification
Producer A, located in a NAFTA country, produces Good A. In the production process, Producer A uses originating Material X and non-originating Material Y to produce Material Z. Material Z is a self-produced material that will be used to produce Good A.
The rule set out in Schedule I for the heading under which Good A is classified specifies a change in tariff classification from any other heading. In this case, both Good A and the non-originating Material Y are of the same heading. However, the self-produced Material Z is of a heading different than that of Good A.
For purposes of determining whether the non-originating materials that are used in the production of Good A undergo the applicable change in tariff classification, Producer A has the option to consider the self-produced Material Z as the material that must undergo a change in tariff classification. As Material Z is of a heading different than that of Good A, Material Z satisfies the applicable change in tariff classification and Good A would qualify as an originating good.
SECTION 5. DE MINIMIS
De minimis rule for non-originating materials that do not undergo subject to authorization, a required tariff change
(1) Except as otherwise provided in subsection (4), a good shall be considered to originate in the territory of a NAFTA country where the value of all non-originating materials that are used in the production of the good and that do not undergo an applicable change in tariff classification as a result of production occurring entirely in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries is not more than seven percent
(a) of the transaction value of the good determined in accordance with Schedule II with respect to the transaction in which the producer of the good sold the good, adjusted to an F.O.B. basis, or
(b) of the total cost of the good, where there is no transaction value for the good under section 2(1) of Schedule III or the transaction value of the good is unacceptable under section 2(2) of that Schedule,
provided that,
(c) if, under the rule in which the applicable change in tariff classification is specified, the good is also subject to a regional value-content requirement, the value of those non-originating materials shall be taken into account in calculating the regional value content of the good in accordance with the method set out for that good, and
(d) the good satisfies all other applicable requirements of this appendix.
(2) For purposes of subsection (1), where
(a) Schedule I sets out two or more alternative rules for the tariff provision under which the good is classified, and
(b) the good, in accordance with subsection (1), is considered to originate under one of those rules,
the good is not required to satisfy the requirements specified in any alternative rule referred to in paragraph (a).
(3) For purposes of subsection (1), in the case of a good that is provided for in heading 2402, the percentage shall be nine percent instead of seven percent.
Exceptions
(4) Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply to
(a) a non-originating material provided for in Chapter 4 or tariff items 1901.90.31, 1901.90.41 and 1901.90.81 (dairy preparations containing over 10 percent by weight of milk solids) that is used in the production of a good provided for in Chapter 4;
(b) a non-originating material provided for in Chapter 4 or tariff items 1901.90.31, 1901.90.41 and 1901.90.81 (dairy preparations containing over 10 percent by weight of milk solids) that is used in the production of a good provided for in any of tariff items 1901.10.10 (infant preparations containing over 10 percent by weight of milk solids), 1901.20.10 (mixes and doughs, containing over 25 percent by weight of butterfat, not put up for retail sale), 1901.90.31, 1901.90.41 and 1901.90.81 (dairy preparations containing over 10 percent by weight of milk solids), heading 2105 and tariff items 2106.90.05, 2106.90.13, 2106.90.41, 2106.90.51 and 2106.90.61 (preparations containing over 10 percent by weight of milk solids), 2202.90.10 and 2202.90.20 (beverages containing milk) and 2309.90.31 (animal feeds containing over 10 percent by weight of milk solids);
(c) a non-originating material provided for in any of heading 0805 and subheadings 2009.11 through 2009.39 that is used in the production of a good provided for in any of subheadings 2009.11 through 2009.39 and tariff items 2106.90.48 and 2106.90.52 (concentrated fruit or vegetable juice of any single fruit or vegetable, fortified with minerals or vitamins) and 2202.90.30, 2202.90.35 and 2202.90.36 (fruit or vegetable juice of any single fruit or vegetable, fortified with minerals or vitamins);
(d) a non-originating material provided for in Chapter 9 that is used in the production of a good provided for in tariff item 2101.11.21 (instant coffee, not flavored);
(e) a non-originating material provided for in Chapter 15 that is used in the production of a good provided for in any of headings 1501 through 1508, 1512, 1514 and 1515;
(f) a non-originating material provided for in heading 1701 that is used in the production of a good provided for in any of headings 1701 through 1703;
(g) a non-originating material provided for in Chapter 17 or heading 1805 that is used in the production of a good provided for in subheading 1806.10;
(h) a non-originating material provided for in any of headings 2203 through 2208 that is used in the production of a good provided for in any of headings 2207 through 2208;
(i) a non-originating material that is used in the production of a good provided for in any of tariff item 7321.11.30 (gas stove or range), subheadings 8415.10 through 8415.83, 8418.10 through 8418.21, 8418.29 through 8418.40, 8421.12, 8422.11, 8450.11 through 8450.20 and 8451.21 through 8451.29, and tariff items 8479.89.55 (trash compactors) and 8516.60.40 (electric stove or range);
(j) a printed circuit assembly that is a non-originating material used in the production of a good, where the applicable change in tariff classification for the good places restrictions on the use of that non-originating material, such as by prohibiting, or limiting the quantity of, that non-originating material;
(k) a non-originating material that is a single juice ingredient provided for in heading 2009 that is used in the production of a good provided for in any of subheading 2009.90 and tariff items 2106.90.18 (concentrated mixtures of fruit or vegetable juice, fortified with minerals or vitamins) and 2202.90.37 (mixtures of fruit or vegetable juices, fortified with minerals or vitamins);
(l) a non-originating material that is used in the production of a good provided for in any of Chapters 1 through 27, unless the non-originating material is of a different subheading than the good for which origin is being determined under this section; or
(m) a non-originating material that is used in the production of a good provided for in any of Chapters 50 through 63.
De minimis rule for regional value-content requirement
(5) A good that is subject to a regional value-content requirement shall be considered to originate in the territory of a NAFTA country and shall not be required to satisfy that requirement where
(a) the value of all non-originating materials used in the production of the good is not more than seven percent
(i) of the transaction value of the good determined in accordance with Schedule II with respect to the transaction in which the producer of the good sold the good, adjusted to an F.O.B. basis, or
(ii) of the total cost of the good, where there is no transaction value for the good under section 2(1) of Schedule III or the transaction value of the good is unacceptable under section 2(2) of that Schedule; and
(b) the good satisfies all other applicable requirements of this appendix.
De minimis rule for textile goods
(6) A good provided for in any of Chapters 50 through 63, that does not originate in the territory of a NAFTA country because certain fibers or yarns that are used in the production of the component of the good that determines the tariff classification of the good do not undergo an applicable change in tariff classification as a result of production occurring entirely in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries, shall be considered to originate in the territory of a NAFTA country if
(a) the total weight of all those fibers or yarns is not more than seven percent of the total weight of that component; and
(b) the good satisfies all other applicable requirements of this appendix.
(7) For purposes of subsection (6),
(a) the component of a good that determines the tariff classification of that good shall be identified in accordance with the first of the following General Rules for the Interpretation of the Harmonized System under which the identification can be determined, namely, Rule 3(b), Rule 3(c) and Rule 4; and
(b) where the component of the good that determines the tariff classification of the good is a blend of two or more yarns or fibers, all yarns and fibers used in the production of the component shall be taken into account in determining the weight of fibers and yarns in that component.
(8) For purposes of subsections (1) and (5), the value of non-originating materials shall be determined in accordance with sections 7(1) through (4).
Calculation of “total cost” for de minimis rules: choice of methods
(9) For purposes of subsection (1)(b) and subsection (5)(a)(ii), the total cost of a good shall be, at the choice of the producer of the good,
(a) the total cost incurred with respect to all goods produced by the producer that can be reasonably allocated to that good in accordance with Schedule VII; or
(b) the aggregate of each cost that forms part of the total cost incurred with respect to that good that can be reasonably allocated to that good in accordance with Schedule VII.
Calculation of total cost; application of Schedules IX and X for determining value of non-originating materials
(10) Total cost under subsection (9) consists of the costs referred to in section 2(6), and is calculated in accordance with that subsection and section 2(7).
(11) For purposes of determining the value under subsection (1) of non-originating materials that do not undergo an applicable change in tariff classification, where Schedule X is not being used to determine the value of those non-originating materials,
(a) if the value of those non-originating materials is being determined as a percentage of the transaction value of the good and the producer chooses under section 6(10) that one of the methods set out in Schedule IX be used to determine the value of those non-originating materials for purposes of calculating the regional value content of the good, the value of those non-originating materials shall be determined in accordance with that method;
(b) if
(i) the value of those non-originating materials is being determined as a percentage of the total cost of the good,
(ii) under the rule in which the applicable change in tariff classification is specified, the good is also subject to a regional value-content requirement and subsection (5)(a) does not apply with respect to that good,
(iii) the regional value content of the good is calculated on the basis of the net cost method, and
(iv) the producer chooses under section 6(15), 11(1), (3) or (6), 12(1) or 13(4) that the regional value content of the good be calculated over a period,
the value of those non-originating materials shall be the sum of the values of non-originating materials determined in accordance with that choice, divided by the number of units of the goods with respect to which the choice is made;
(c) if
(i) the value of those non-originating materials is being determined as a percentage of the total cost of the good,
(ii) under the rule in which the applicable change in tariff classification is specified, the good is not also subject to a regional value-content requirement or subsection (5)(a) applies with respect to that good, and
(iii) the producer chooses under section 2(7)(b) that, for purposes of section 5(9), the total cost of the good be calculated over a period,
the value of those non-originating materials shall be the sum of the values of non-originating materials divided by the number of units produced during that period; and
(d) in any other case, the value of those non-originating materials may, at the choice of the producer, be determined in accordance with one of the methods set out in Schedule IX.
(12) For purposes of subsection (5), the value of the non-originating materials used in the production of the good may, at the choice of the producer, be determined in accordance with one of the methods set out in Schedule IX.
Examples illustrating de minimis rules
(13) Each of the following examples is an “Example” as referred to in section 2(4).
Example 1:section 5(1)
Producer A, located in a NAFTA country, uses originating materials and non-originating materials in the production of copper anodes provided for in heading 7402. The rule set out in Schedule I for heading 7402 specifies a change in tariff classification from any other chapter. There is no applicable regional value-content requirement for this heading. Therefore, in order for the copper anode to qualify as an originating good under the rule set out in Schedule I, Producer A may not use in the production of the copper anode any non-originating material provided for in Chapter 74.
All of the materials used in the production of the copper anode are originating materials, with the exception of a small amount of copper scrap provided for in heading 7404, that is in the same chapter as the copper anode. Under section 5(1), if the value of the non-originating copper scrap does not exceed seven percent of the transaction value of the copper anode or the total cost of the copper anode, whichever is applicable, the copper anode would be considered an originating good.
Example 2:section 5(2)
Producer A, located in a NAFTA country, uses originating materials and non-originating materials in the production of ceiling fans provided for in subheading 8414.51. There are two alternative rules set out in Schedule I for subheading 8414.51, one of which specifies a change in tariff classification from any other heading. The other rule specifies both a change in tariff classification from the subheading under which parts of the ceiling fans are classified and a regional value-content requirement. Therefore, in order for the ceiling fan to qualify as an originating good under the first of the alternative rules, all of the materials that are classified under the subheading for parts of ceiling fans and used in the production of the completed ceiling fan must be originating materials.
In this case, all of the non-originating materials used in the production of the ceiling fan satisfy the change in tariff classification set out in the rule that specifies a change in tariff classification from any other heading, with the exception of one non-originating material that is classified under the subheading for parts of ceiling fans. Under section 5(1), if the value of the non-originating material that does not satisfy the change in tariff classification specified in the first rule does not exceed seven percent of the transaction value of the ceiling fan or the total cost of the ceiling fan, whichever is applicable, the ceiling fan would be considered an originating good. Therefore, under section 5(2), the ceiling fan would not be required to satisfy the alternative rule that specifies both a change in tariff classification and a regional value-content requirement.
Example 3:section 5(2)
Producer A, located in a NAFTA country, uses originating materials and non-originating materials in the production of plastic bags provided for in subheading 3923.29. The rule set out in Schedule I for subheading 3923.29 specifies both a change in tariff classification from any other heading, except from subheadings 3920.20 or 3920.71, under which certain plastic materials are classified, and a regional value-content requirement. Therefore, with respect to that part of the rule that specifies a change in tariff classification, in order for the plastic bag to qualify as an originating good, any plastic materials that are classified under subheading 3920.20 or 3920.71 and that are used in the production of the plastic bag must be originating materials.
In this case, all of the non-originating materials used in the production of the plastic bag satisfy the specified change in tariff classification, with the exception of a small amount of plastic materials classified under subheading 3920.71. Section 5(1) provides that the plastic bag can be considered an originating good if the value of the non-originating plastic materials that do not satisfy the specified change in tariff classification does not exceed seven percent of the transaction value of the plastic bag or the total cost of the plastic bag, whichever is applicable. In this case, the value of those non-originating materials that do not satisfy the specified change in tariff classification does not exceed the seven percent limit.
However, the rule set out in Schedule I for subheading 3923.29 specifies both a change in tariff classification and a regional value-content requirement. Therefore, under section 5(1)(c), in order to be considered an originating good, the plastic bag must also, except as otherwise provided in section 5(5), satisfy the regional value-content requirement specified in that rule. As provided in section 5(1)(c), the value of the non-originating materials that do not satisfy the specified change in tariff classification, together with the value of all other non-originating materials used in the production of the plastic bag, will be taken into account in calculating the regional value content of the plastic bag.
Example 4:section 5(5)
Producer A, located in a NAFTA country, primarily uses originating materials in the production of shoes provided for in heading 6405. The rule set out in Schedule I for heading 6405 specifies both a change in tariff classification from any subheading other than subheadings 6401.10 through 6406.10 and a regional value-content requirement.
With the exception of a small amount of materials provided for in Chapter 39, all of the materials used in the production of the shoes are originating materials.
Under section 5(5), if the value of all of the non-originating materials used in the production of the shoes does not exceed seven percent of the transaction value of the shoes or the total cost of the shoes, whichever is applicable, the shoes are not required to satisfy the regional value-content requirement specified in the rule set out in Schedule I in order to be considered originating goods.
Example 5:section 5(5)
Producer A, located in a NAFTA country, produces barbers' chairs provided for in subheading 9402.10. The rule set out in Schedule I for goods provided for in heading 9402 specifies a change in tariff classification from any other chapter. All of the materials used in the production of these chairs are originating materials, with the exception of a small quantity of non-originating materials that are classified as parts of barbers' chairs. These parts undergo no change in tariff classification because subheading 9402.10 provides for both barbers' chairs and their parts.
Although Producer A's barbers' chairs do not qualify as originating goods under the rule set out in Schedule I, section 4(4)(b) provides, among other things, that, where there is no change in tariff classification from the non-originating materials to the goods because the subheading under which the goods are classified provides for both the goods and their parts, the goods shall qualify as originating goods if they satisfy a specified regional value-content requirement.
However, under section 5(5), if the value of the non-originating materials does not exceed seven percent of the transaction value of the barbers' chairs or the total cost of the barbers' chairs, whichever is applicable, the barbers' chairs will be considered originating goods and are not required to satisfy the regional value-content requirement set out in section 4(4)(b)(v).
Example 6:sections 5 (6) and (7)
Producer A, located in a NAFTA country, produces women's dresses provided for in subheading 6204.41 from fine wool fabric of heading 5112. This fine wool fabric, also produced by Producer A, is the component of the dress that determines its tariff classification under subheading 6204.41.
The rule set out in Schedule I for subheading 6204.41, under which the dress is classified, specifies both a change in tariff classification from any other chapter, except from those headings and chapters under which certain yarns and fabrics, including combed wool yarn and wool fabric, are classified, and a requirement that the good be cut and sewn or otherwise assembled in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries.
Therefore, with respect to that part of the rule that specifies a change in tariff classification, in order for the dress to qualify as an originating good, the combed wool yarn and the fine wool fabric made therefrom that are used by Producer A in the production of the dress must be originating materials.
At one point Producer A uses a small quantity of non-originating combed wool yarn in the production of the fine wool fabric. Under section 5(6), if the total weight of the non-originating combed wool yarn does not exceed seven percent of the total weight of all the yarn used in the production of the component of the dress that determines its tariff classification, that is, the wool fabric, the dress would be considered an originating good.
PART III
SECTION 6. REGIONAL VALUE CONTENT
(1) Except as otherwise provided in subsection (6), the regional value content of a good shall be calculated, at the choice of the exporter or producer of the good, on the basis of either the transaction value method or the net cost method.
Transaction Value Method
(2) The transaction value method for calculating the regional value content of a good is as follows:
where
RVC is the regional value content of the good, expressed as a percentage;
TV is the transaction value of the good, determined in accordance with Schedule II with respect to the transaction in which the producer of the good sold the good, adjusted to an F.O.B. basis; and
VNM is the value of non-originating materials used by the producer in the production of the good, determined in accordance with section 7.
Net Cost Method
(3) The net cost method for calculating the regional value content of a good is as follows:
where
RVC is the regional value content of the good, expressed as a percentage;
NC is the net cost of the good, calculated in accordance with subsection (11); and
VNM is the value of non-originating materials used by the producer in the production of the good, determined, except as otherwise provided in sections 9 and 10, in accordance with section 7.
VNM does not include value of non-originating materials used in originating material
(4) Except as otherwise provided in section 9 and section 10(1)(d), for purposes of calculating the regional value content of a good under subsection (2) or (3), the value of non-originating materials used by a producer in the production of the good shall not include
(a) the value of any non-originating materials used by another producer in the production of originating materials that are subsequently acquired and used by the producer of the good in the production of that good; or
(b) the value of any non-originating materials used by the producer in the production of a self-produced material that is an originating material and is designated as an intermediate material.
(5) For purposes of subsection (4),
(a) in the case of any self-produced material that is not designated as an intermediate material, only the value of any non-originating materials used in the production of the self-produced material shall be included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the good; and
(b) where a self-produced material that is designated as an intermediate material and is an originating material is used by the producer of the good with non-originating materials (whether or not those non-originating materials are produced by that producer) in the production of the good, the value of those non-originating materials shall be included in the value of non-originating materials.
Net Cost Method required in certain circumstances
(6) The regional value content of a good shall be calculated only on the basis of the net cost method where
(a) there is no transaction value for the good under section 2(1) of Schedule III;
(b) the transaction value of the good is unacceptable under section 2(2) of Schedule III;
(c) the good is sold by the producer to a related person and the volume, by units of quantity, of sales by that producer of identical goods or similar goods, or any combination thereof, to related persons during the six month period immediately preceding the month in which the goods are sold exceeds 85 percent of the producer's total sales to all persons, whether or not related and regardless of location, after “the producer's total sales”of identical goods or similar goods, or any combination thereof, during that period;
(d) the good is
(i) a motor vehicle provided for in any of headings 8701 and 8702, subheadings 8703.21 through 8703.90 and headings 8704, 8705 and 8706,
(ii) a good provided for in a tariff provision listed in Schedule IV or an automotive component assembly, automotive component, sub-component or listed material, and is for use in a motor vehicle referred to in subparagraph (i), either as original equipment or as an after-market part,
(iii) a good provided for in any of subheadings 6401.10 through 6406.10, or
(iv) a good provided for in subheading 8469.11;
(e) the exporter or producer chooses to accumulate with respect to the good in accordance with section 14; or
(f) the good is an intermediate material and is subject to a regional value-content requirement.
Option to change from TVM to NCM for calculation of regional value content
(7) If the exporter or producer of a good calculates the regional value content of the good on the basis of the transaction value method and the customs administration of a NAFTA country subsequently notifies that exporter or producer in writing, during the course of a verification of origin, that
(a) the transaction value of the good, as determined by the exporter or producer, is required to be adjusted under section 4 of Schedule II or is unacceptable under section 2(2) of Schedule III, there is no transaction value for the good under section 2(1) of Schedule III or the transaction value method may not be used because of the application of subsection (6)(c), or
(b) the value of any material used in the production of the good, as determined by the exporter or producer, is required to be adjusted under section 5 of Schedule VIII or is unacceptable under section 2(3) of Schedule VIII, or there is no transaction value for the material under section 2(2) of Schedule VIII or the transaction value method may not be used to calculate the regional value content of the material because of the application of subsection (6)(c),
the exporter or producer may choose that the regional value content of the good be calculated on the basis of the net cost method, in which case the calculation must be made within 60 days after the producer receives the notification, or such longer period as that customs administration specifies.
Change from NCM to TVM not permitted
(8) If the exporter or producer of a good chooses that the regional value content of the good be calculated on the basis of the net cost method and the customs administration of a NAFTA country subsequently notifies that exporter or producer in writing, during the course of a verification of origin, that the good does not satisfy the applicable regional value-content requirement, the exporter or producer of the good may not recalculate the regional value content on the basis of the transaction value method.
(9) Nothing in subsection (7) shall be construed as preventing any review and appeal under Article 510 of the Agreement, as implemented in each NAFTA country, of an adjustment to or a rejection of
(a) the transaction value of the good; or
(b) the value of any material used in the production of the good.
Application of Schedule IX for determining value of “identical” non-originating materials under TVM
(10) For purposes of the transaction value method, where non-originating materials that are the same as one another in all respects, including physical characteristics, quality and reputation but excluding minor differences in appearance, are used in the production of a good, the value of those non-originating materials may, at the choice of the producer of the good, be determined in accordance with one of the methods set out in Schedule IX.
Options for calculating the net cost of a good
(11) For purposes of subsection (3), the net cost of a good may be calculated, at the choice of the producer of the good, by
(a) calculating the total cost incurred with respect to all goods produced by that producer, subtracting any excluded costs that are included in that total cost, and reasonably allocating, in accordance with Schedule VII, the remainder to the good;
(b) calculating the total cost incurred with respect to all goods produced by that producer, reasonably allocating, in accordance with Schedule VII, that total cost to the good, and subtracting any excluded costs that are included in the amount allocated to that good; or
(c) reasonably allocating, in accordance with Schedule VII, each cost that forms part of the total cost incurred with respect to the good so that the aggregate of those costs does not include any excluded costs.
Calculation of total cost
(12) Total cost under subsection (11) consists of the costs referred to in section 2(6), and is calculated in accordance with that subsection.
Calculation of net cost; excluded costs
(13) For purposes of calculating net cost under subsection (11),
(a) excluded costs shall be the excluded costs that are recorded on the books of the producer of the good;
(b) excluded costs that are included in the value of a material that is used in the production of the good shall not be subtracted from or otherwise excluded from the total cost; and
(c) excluded costs do not include any amount paid for research and development services performed in the territory of a NAFTA country.
Non-allowable interest; determination under Schedule XI
(14) For purposes of calculating non-allowable interest costs, the determination of whether interest costs incurred by a producer are more than 700 basis points above the yield on debt obligations of comparable maturities issued by the federal government of the country in which the producer is located shall be made in accordance with Schedule XI.
Use of “averaging” over a period to calculate RVC under NCM; period cannot be changed
(15) For purposes of the net cost method, the regional value content of the good, other than a good with respect to which a choice to average may be made under section 11(1), (3) or (6), 12(1) or 13(4), may be calculated, where the producer chooses to do so, by
(a) calculating the sum of the net costs incurred and the sum of the values of non-originating materials used by the producer of the good with respect to the good and identical goods or similar goods, or any combination thereof, produced in a single plant by the producer over
(i) a month,
(ii) any consecutive three month or six month period that falls within and is evenly divisible into the number of months of the producer's fiscal year remaining at the beginning of that period, or
(iii) the producer's fiscal year; and
(b) using the sums referred to in paragraph (a) as the net cost and the value of non-originating materials, respectively.
(16) The calculation made under subsection (15) shall apply with respect to all units of the good produced during the period chosen by the producer under subsection (15)(a).
(17) A choice made under subsection (15) may not be rescinded or modified with respect to the goods or the period with respect to which the choice is made.
Choice of averaging period cannot be changed for remainder of fiscal year
(18) Where a producer chooses a one, three or six month period under subsection (15) with respect to goods, the producer shall be considered to have chosen under that subsection a period or periods of the same duration for the remainder of the producer's fiscal year with respect to those goods.
Choice of net cost method cannot be changed for remainder of the fiscal year
(19) Where the net cost method is required to be used or has been chosen and a choice has been made under subsection (15), the regional value content of the good shall be calculated on the basis of the net cost method over the period chosen under that subsection and for the remainder of the producer's fiscal year.
Obligation to perform self-analysis and give notification of changed circumstance if RVC calculated on basis of estimated costs
(20) Except as otherwise provided in sections 11(10), 12(11) and 13(10), where the producer of a good has calculated the regional value content of the good under the net cost method on the basis of estimated costs, including standard costs, budgeted forecasts or other similar estimating procedures, before or during the period chosen in subsection (15)(a), the producer shall conduct an analysis at the end of the producer's fiscal year of the actual costs incurred over the period with respect to the production of the good and, if the good does not satisfy the regional value-content requirement on the basis of the actual costs during that period, immediately inform any person to whom the producer has provided a Certificate of Origin for the good, or a written statement that the good is an originating good, that the good is a non-originating good.
Option to treat any material as non-originating
(21) For purposes of calculating the regional value content of a good, the producer of that good may choose to treat any material used in the production of that good as a non-originating material.
Examples of Calculation of RVC under TVM and NCM
(22) Each of the following examples is an “Example” as referred to in section 2(4).
Example 1: example of point of direct shipment (with respect to adjusted to an F.O.B. basis)
A producer has only one factory, at which the producer manufactures finished office chairs. Because the factory is located close to transportation facilities, all units of the finished good are stored in a factory warehouse 200 meters from the end of the production line. Goods are shipped worldwide from this warehouse. The point of direct shipment is the warehouse.
Example 2: examples of point of direct shipment (with respect to adjusted to an F.O.B. basis)
A producer has six factories, all located within the territory of one of the NAFTA countries, at which the producer produces garden tools of various types. These tools are shipped worldwide, and orders usually consist of bulk orders of various types of tools. Because different tools are manufactured at different factories, the producer decided to consolidate storage and shipping facilities and ships all finished products to a large warehouse located near the seaport, from which all orders are shipped. The distance from the factories to the warehouse varies from 3 km to 130 km. The point of direct shipment for each of the goods is the warehouse.
Example 3: examples of point of direct shipment (with respect to adjusted to an F.O.B. basis)
A producer has only one factory, located near the center of one of the NAFTA countries, at which the producer manufactures finished office chairs. The office chairs are shipped from that factory to three warehouses leased by the producer, one on the west coast, one near the factory and one on the east coast. The office chairs are shipped to buyers from these warehouses, the shipping location depending on the shipping distance from the buyer. Buyers closest to the west coast warehouse are normally supplied by the west coast warehouse, buyers closest to the east coast are normally supplied by the warehouse located on the east coast and buyers closest to the warehouse near the factory are normally supplied by that warehouse. In this case, the point of direct shipment is the location of the warehouse from which the office chairs are normally shipped to customers in the location in which the buyer is located.
Example 4:section 6(3), net cost method
A producer located in NAFTA country A sells Good A that is subject to a regional value-content requirement to a buyer located in NAFTA country B. The producer of Good A chooses that the regional value content of that good be calculated using the net cost method. All applicable requirements of this appendix, other than the regional value-content requirement, have been met. The applicable regional value-content requirement is 50 percent.
In order to calculate the regional value-content of Good A, the producer first calculates the net cost of Good A. Under section 6(11)(a), the net cost is the total cost of Good A (the aggregate of the product costs, period costs and other costs) per unit, minus the excluded costs (the aggregate of the sales promotion, marketing and after-sales service costs, royalties, shipping and packing costs and non-allowable interest costs) per unit. The producer uses the following figures to calculate the net cost:
Product costs:
Value of originating materials $30.00
Value of non-originating materials 40.00
Other product costs 20.00
Period costs 10.00
Other costs 0.00
Total cost of Good A, per unit $100.00
Excluded costs:
Sales promotion, marketing and after-sales service cost $5.00
Royalties 2.50
Shipping and packing costs 3.00
Non-allowable interest costs 1.50
Total excluded costs $12.00
The net cost is the total cost of Good A, per unit, minus the excluded costs.
Total cost of Good A, per unit: $100.00
Excluded costs −12.00
Net cost of Good A, per unit $88.00
The value for net cost ($88) and the value of non-originating materials ($40) are needed in order to calculate the regional value content. The producer calculates the regional value content of Good A under the net cost method in the following manner:
Therefore, under the net cost method, Good A qualifies as an originating good, with a regional value-content of 54.5 percent.
Example 5:section 6(6)(c), net cost method required for certain sales to related persons
On January 15, 1994, a producer located in NAFTA country A sells 1,000 units of Good A to a related person, located in NAFTA country B. During the six month period beginning on July 1, 1993 and ending on December 31, 1993, the producer sold 90,000 units of identical goods and similar goods to related persons from various countries, including that buyer. The producer's total sales of those identical goods and similar goods to all persons from all countries during that six month period were 100,000 units.
The total quantity of identical goods and similar goods sold by the producer to related persons during that six month period was 90 percent of the producer's total sales of those identical goods and similar goods to all persons. Under section 6(6)(c), the producer must use the net cost method to calculate the regional value content of Good A sold in January 1994, because the 85 percent limit was exceeded.
Example 6:section 6(11)(a)
A producer in a NAFTA country produces Good A and Good B during the producer's fiscal year.
The producer uses the following figures, which are recorded on the producer's books and represent all of the costs incurred with respect to both Good A and Good B, to calculate the net cost of those goods:
Product costs:
Value of originating materials $2,000
Value of non-originating materials 1,000
Other product costs 2,400
Period costs: (including $1,200 in excluded costs) 3,200
Other costs 400
Total cost of Good A and Good B $9,000
The net cost is the total cost of Good A and Good B, minus the excluded costs incurred with respect to those goods.
Total cost of Good A and Good B $9,000
Excluded costs −1,200
Net cost of Good A and Good B $7,800
The net cost must then be reasonably allocated, in accordance with Schedule VII, to Good A and Good B.
Example 7:section 6(11)(b)
A producer located in a NAFTA country produces Good A and Good B during the producer's fiscal year. In order to calculate the regional value content of Good A and Good B, the producer uses the following figures that are recorded on the producer's books and incurred with respect to those goods:
Product costs:
Value of originating materials $2,000
Value of non-originating materials 1,000
Other product costs 2,400
Period costs: (including $1,200 in excluded costs) 3,200
Other costs 400
Total cost of Good A and Good B $9,000
Under section 6(11)(b), the total cost of Good A and Good B is then reasonably allocated, in accordance with Schedule VII, to those goods. The costs are allocated in the following manner:
Allocated toGood A Allocated toGood B
Total cost ($9,000 for both Good A and Good B) $5,220 $3,780
The excluded costs ($1,200) that are included in total cost allocated to Good A and Good B, in accordance with Schedule VII, are subtracted from that amount.
Excluded Cost Allocated to Good A Excluded Cost Allocated to Good B
Total excluded costs:
Sales promotion, marketing and after-sale service costs 500 290 210
Royalties 200 116 84
Shipping and packing costs 500 290 210
Net cost (total cost minus excluded costs) $4,524 $3,276
The net cost of Good A is thus $4,524, and the net cost of Good B is $3,276.
Example 8:section 6(11)(c)
A Producer located in a NAFTA country produces Good C and Good D. The following costs are recorded on the producer's books for the months of January, February and March, and each cost that forms part of the total cost are reasonably allocated, in accordance with Schedule VII, to Good C and Good D.
Total cost: Good C and Good D (in thousands of dollars) Allocated to Good C (in thousands of dollars) Allocated to Good D (in thousands of dollars)
Product costs:
Value of originating materials 100 0 100
Value of non-originating materials 900 800 100
Other product costs 500 300 200
Period costs (including $420 in excluded costs) 5,679 3,036 2,643
Minus Excluded Costs 420 300 120
Other costs 0 0 0
Total cost (aggregate of product costs, period costs and other costs) 6,759 3,836 2,923
Example 9:section 6(12)
Producer A, located in a NAFTA country, produces Good A that is subject to a regional value-content requirement. The producer chooses that the regional value content of that good be calculated using the net cost method. Producer A buys Material X from Producer B, located in a NAFTA country. Material X is a non-originating material and is used in the production of Good A. Producer A provides Producer B, at no charge, with tools to be used in the production of Material X. The cost of the tools that is recorded on the books of Producer A has been expensed in the current year. Pursuant to section 5(1)(b)(ii) of Schedule VIII, the value of the tools is included in the value of Material X. Therefore, the cost of the tools that is recorded on the books of Producer A and that has been expensed in the current year cannot be included as a separate cost in the net cost of Good A because it has already been included in the value of Material X.
Example 10:section 6(12)
Producer A, located in a NAFTA country, produces Good A that is subject to a regional value-content requirement. The producer chooses that the regional value content of that good be calculated using the net cost method and averages the calculation over the producer's fiscal year under section 6(15). Producer A determines that during that fiscal year Producer A incurred a gain on foreign currency conversion of $10,000 and a loss on foreign currency conversion of $8,000, resulting in a net gain of $2,000. Producer A also determines that $7,000 of the gain on foreign currency conversion and $6,000 of the loss on foreign currency conversion is related to the purchase of non-originating materials used in the production of Good A, and $3,000 of the gain on foreign currency conversion and $2,000 of the loss on foreign currency conversion is not related to the production of Good A. The producer determines that the total cost of Good A is $45,000 before deducting the $1,000 net gain on foreign currency conversion related to the production of Good A. The total cost of Good A is therefore $44,000. That $1,000 net gain is not included in the value of non-originating materials under section 7(1).
Example 11:section 6(12)
Given the same facts as in example 10, except that Producer A determines that $6,000 of the gain on foreign currency conversion and $7,000 of the loss on foreign currency conversion is related to the purchase of non-originating materials used in the production of Good A. The total cost of Good A is $45,000, which includes the $1,000 net loss on foreign currency conversion related to the production of Good A. That $1,000 net loss is not included in the value of non-originating materials under section 7(1).
PART IV
SECTION 7. MATERIALS
Valuation of materials used in the production of a good other than certain automotive goods
(1) Except as otherwise provided for non-originating materials used in the production of a good referred to in section 9(1) or 10(1), and except in the case of indirect materials, intermediate materials and packing materials and containers, for purposes of calculating the regional value content of a good and for purposes of sections 5(1) and (5), the value of a material that is used in the production of the good shall be
(a) except as otherwise provided in subsection (2), where the material is imported by the producer of the good into the territory of the NAFTA country in which the good is produced, the customs value of the material with respect to that importation, or
(b) where the material is acquired by the producer of the good from another person located in the territory of the NAFTA country in which the good is produced
(i) the transaction value, determined in accordance with section 2(1) of Schedule VIII, with respect to the transaction in which the producer acquired the material, or
(ii) the value determined in accordance with sections 6 through 11 of Schedule VIII, where, with respect to the transaction in which the producer acquired the material, there is no transaction value under section 2(2) of that Schedule or the transaction value is unacceptable under section 2(3) of that Schedule,
and shall include the following costs if they are not included under paragraph (a) or (b):
(c) the costs of freight, insurance and packing and all other costs incurred in transporting the material to the location of the producer,
(d) duties and taxes paid or payable with respect to the material in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries, other than duties and taxes that are waived, refunded, refundable or otherwise recoverable, including credit against duty or tax paid or payable,
(e) customs brokerage fees, including the cost of in-house customs brokerage services, incurred with respect to the material in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries, and
(f) the cost of waste and spoilage resulting from the use of the material in the production of the good, minus the value of any reusable scrap or by-product.
Valuation of material if customs value is not in accordance with Schedule VIII
(2) For purposes of subsection (1)(a), where the customs value of the material referred to in that paragraph was not determined in a manner consistent with Schedule VIII, the value of the material shall be determined in accordance with Schedule VIII with respect to the importation of that material and, where the costs referred to in subsections (1)(c) through (f) are not included in that value, those costs be added to that value.
Costs recorded on books
(3) For purposes of subsection (1), the costs referred to in subsections (1)(c) through (f) shall be the costs referred to in those paragraphs that are recorded on the books of the producer of the good.
Designation of self-produced material as an intermediate material; limitation on designations; designation is optional
(4) Except for purposes of determining the value of non-originating materials used in the production of a light-duty automotive good and except in the case of an automotive component assembly, automotive component or sub-component for use as original equipment in the production of a heavy-duty vehicle, for purposes of calculating the regional value content of a good the producer of the good may designate as an intermediate material any self-produced material that is used in the production of the good, provided that where an intermediate material is subject to a regional value-content requirement, no other self-produced material that is subject to a regional value-content requirement and is incorporated into that intermediate material is also designated by the producer as an intermediate material.
(5) For purposes of subsection (4),
(a) in order to qualify as an originating material, a self-produced material that is designated as an intermediate material must qualify as an originating material under these Regulations;
(b) the designation of a self-produced material as an intermediate material shall be made solely at the choice of the producer of that self-produced material; and
(c) except as otherwise provided in section 14(4), the proviso set out in subsection (4) does not apply with respect to an intermediate material used by another producer in the production of a material that is subsequently acquired and used in the production of a good by the producer referred to in subsection (4).
Valuation of an intermediate material
(6) The value of an intermediate material shall be, at the choice of the producer of the good,
(a) the total cost incurred with respect to all goods produced by the producer that can be reasonably allocated to that intermediate material in accordance with Schedule VII; or
(b) the aggregate of each cost that forms part of the total cost incurred with respect to that intermediate material that can be reasonably allocated to that intermediate material in accordance with Schedule VII.
Calculation of total cost
(7) Total cost under subsection (6) consists of the costs referred to in section 2(6), and is calculated in accordance with that section and section 2(7).
Rescission of a designation during course of verification; option to designate another intermediate material
(8) Where a producer of a good designates a self-produced material as an intermediate material under subsection (4) and the customs administration of a NAFTA country into which the good is imported determines during a verification of origin of the good that the intermediate material is a non-originating material and notifies the producer of this in writing before the written determination of whether the good qualifies as an originating good, the producer may rescind the designation, and the regional value content of the good shall be calculated as though the self-produced material were not so designated.
(9) A producer of a good who rescinds a designation under subsection (8)
(a) shall retain any rights of review and appeal under Article 510 of the Agreement, as implemented in each NAFTA country, with respect to the determination of the origin of the intermediate material as though the producer did not rescind the designation; and
(b) may, not later than 30 days after the customs administration referred to in subsection (8) notifies the producer in writing that the self-produced material referred to in paragraph (a) is a non-originating material, designate as an intermediate material another self-produced material that is incorporated into the good, subject to the proviso set out in subsection (4).
(10) Where a producer of a good designates another self-produced material as an intermediate material under subsection (9)(b) and the customs administration referred to in subsection (8) determines during the verification of origin of the good that that self-produced material is a non-originating material,
(a) the producer may rescind the designation, and the regional value content of the good shall be calculated as though the self-produced material were not so designated;
(b) the producer shall retain any rights of review and appeal under Article 510 of the Agreement, as implemented in each NAFTA country, with respect to the determination of the origin of the intermediate material as though the producer did not rescind the designation; and
(c) the producer may not designate another self-produced material that is incorporated into the good as an intermediate material.
Indirect Materials; deemed originating; value as recorded on books of producer
(11) For purposes of determining whether a good is an originating good, an indirect material that is used in the production of the good
(a) shall be considered to be an originating material, regardless of where that indirect material is produced; and
(b) if the good is subject to a regional value-content requirement, for purposes of calculating the net cost under the net cost method, the value of the indirect material shall be the costs of that material that are recorded on the books of the producer of the good.
Packaging Materials and Containers; origin disregarded for tariff change rules
(12) Packaging materials and containers, if classified under the Harmonized System with the good that is packaged therein, shall be disregarded for purposes of
(a) determining whether all of the non-originating materials used in the production of the good undergo an applicable change in tariff classification; and
(b) determining under section 5(1) the value of non-originating materials that do not undergo an applicable change in tariff classification.
Actual originating status considered for RVC requirement; valuation of packaging
(13) Where packaging materials and containers are classified under the Harmonized System with the good that is packaged therein and that good is subject to a regional value-content requirement, the value of those packaging materials and containers shall be taken into account as originating materials or non-originating materials, as the case may be, for purposes of calculating the regional value content of the good.
(14) For purposes of subsection (13), where packaging materials and containers are self-produced materials, the producer may choose to designate those materials as intermediate materials under subsection (4).
Packing materials and containers; disregarded for tariff change rule and for RVC requirement; value as recorded on books
(15) For purposes of determining whether a good is an originating good, packing materials and containers in which the good is packed
(a) shall be disregarded for purposes of determining whether
(i) the non-originating materials used in the production of the good undergo an applicable change in tariff classification, and
(ii) the good satisfies a regional value-content requirement; and
(b) if the good is subject to a regional value-content requirement, the value of the packing materials and containers shall be the costs thereof that are recorded on the books of the producer of the good.
Fungible materials; fungible commingled goods; inventory management methods for determining whether originating
(16) Subject to subsection (16.1), for purposes of determining whether a good is an originating good,
(a) where originating materials and non-originating materials that are fungible materials
(i) are withdrawn from an inventory in one location and used in the production of the good, or
(ii) are withdrawn from inventories in more than one location in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries and used in the production of the good at the same production facility,
the determination of whether the materials are originating materials may be made on the basis of any of the applicable inventory management methods set out in Schedule X; and
(b) where originating goods and non-originating goods that are fungible goods are physically combined or mixed in inventory and prior to exportation do not undergo production or any other operation in the territory of the NAFTA country in which they were physically combined or mixed in inventory, other than unloading, reloading or any other operation necessary to preserve the goods in good condition or to transport the goods for exportation to the territory of another NAFTA country, the determination of whether the good is an originating good may be made on the basis of any of the applicable inventory management methods set out in Schedule X.
(16.1) Where fungible materials referred to in subsection (16)(a) and fungible goods referred to in subsection (16)(b) are withdrawn from the same inventory, the inventory management method used for the materials must be the same as the inventory management method used for goods, and where the averaging method is used, the respective averaging periods for fungible materials and fungible goods are to be used.
(16.2) A choice of inventory management methods under subsection (16) shall be considered to have been made when the customs administration of the NAFTA country into which the good is imported is informed in writing of the choice during the course of a verification of the origin of the good.
Accessories, spare parts and tools; deemed originating for tariff change rule; actual origin applicable for RVC requirement
(17) Accessories, spare parts or tools that are delivered with a good and form part of the good's standard accessories, spare parts or tools are originating materials if the good is an originating good, and shall be disregarded for purposes of determining whether all the non-originating materials used in the production of the good undergo an applicable change in tariff classification or determining under section 5(1) the value of non-originating materials that do not undergo an applicable change in tariff classification, provided that
(a) the accessories, spare parts or tools are not invoiced separately from the good; and
(b) the quantities and value of the accessories, spare parts or tools are customary for the good, within the industry that produces the good.
(18) Where a good is subject to a regional value-content requirement, the value of accessories, spare parts and tools that are delivered with that good and form part of the good's standard accessories, spare parts or tools shall be taken into account as originating or non-originating materials, as the case may be, in calculating the regional value content of the good.
(19) For purposes of subsection (18), where accessories, spare parts and tools are self-produced materials, the producer may choose to designate those materials as intermediate materials under subsection (4).
Examples illustrating the provisions on materials
(20) Each of the following examples is an “Example” as referred to in section 2(4).
Example 1:section 7(2), Customs Value not Determined in a Manner Consistent with Schedule VIII
Producer A, located in NAFTA country A, imports material A into NAFTA country A. Producer A purchased material A from a middleman located in country B. The middleman purchased the material from a manufacturer located in country B. Under the laws in NAFTA country A that implement the Agreement on Implementation of Article VII of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, the customs value of material A was based on the price actually paid or payable by the middleman to the manufacturer. Producer A uses material A to produce Good C, and exports Good C to NAFTA country D. Good C is subject to a regional value-content requirement.
Under section 4(1) of Schedule VIII, the price actually paid or payable is the total payment made or to be made by the producer to or for the benefit of the seller of the material. Section 1 of that Schedule defines producer and seller for purposes of the Schedule. A producer is the person who uses the material in the production of a good that is subject to a regional value-content requirement. A seller is the person who sells the material being valued to the producer.
The customs value of material A was not determined in a manner consistent with Schedule VIII because it was based on the price actually paid or payable by the middleman to the manufacturer, rather than on the price actually paid or payable by Producer A to the middleman. Thus, section 7(2) applies and material A is valued in accordance with Schedule VIII.
Example 2:section 7(5), Value of Intermediate Materials
A producer located in a NAFTA country produces Good B, which is subject to a regional value-content requirement under section 4(2)(b). The producer also produces Material A, which is used in the production of Good B. Both originating materials and non-originating materials are used in the production of Material A. Material A is subject to a change in tariff classification requirement under section 4(2)(a). The costs to produce Material A are the following:
Product costs:
Value of originating materials $1.00
Value of non-originating materials 7.50
Other product costs 1.50
Period costs (including $0.30 in royalties) 0.50
Other costs 0.10
Total cost of Material A $10.60
The producer designates Material A as an intermediate material and determines that, because all of the non-originating materials that are used in the production of Material A undergo an applicable change in tariff classification set out in Schedule I, Material A would, under paragraph 4(2)(a) qualify as an originating material. The cost of the non-originating materials used in the production of Material A is therefore not included in the value of non-originating materials that are used in the production of Good B for the purpose of determining the regional value content of Good B. Because Material A has been designated as an intermediate material, the total cost of Material A, which is $10.60, is treated as the cost of originating materials for the purpose of calculating the regional value content of Good B. The total cost of Good B is determined in accordance with the following figures:
Product costs:
Value of originating materials
—intermediate materials $10.60
—other materials 3.00
Value of non-originating materials 5.50
Other product costs 6.50
Period costs 2.50
Other costs 0.10
Total cost of Good B $28.20
Example 3:section 7(5), Effects of the Designation of Self-produced Materials on Net Cost
The ability to designate intermediate materials helps to put the vertically integrated producer who is self-producing materials that are used in the production of a good on par with a producer who is purchasing materials and valuing those materials in accordance with subsection 7(1). The following situations demonstrate how this is achieved:
Situation 1
A producer located in a NAFTA country produces Good B, which is subject to a regional value-content requirement of 50 percent under the net cost method. Good B satisfies all other applicable requirements of these Regulations. The producer purchases Material A, which is used in the production of Good B, from a supplier located in a NAFTA country. The value of Material A determined in accordance with subsection 7(1) is $11.00. Material A is an originating material. All other materials used in the production of Good B are non-originating materials. The net cost of Good B is determined as follows:
Product costs:
Value of originating materials (Material A) $11.00
Value of non-originating materials 5.50
Other product costs 6.50
Period costs: (including $0.20 in excluded costs) 0.50
Other costs 0.10
Total cost of Good B $23.60
Excluded costs: (included in period costs) −0.20
Net cost of Good B $23.40
The regional value content of Good B is calculated as follows:
The regional value content of Good B is 76.5 percent, and Good B, therefore, qualifies as an originating good.
Situation 2
A producer located in a NAFTA country produces Good B, which is subject to a regional value-content requirement of 50 percent under the net cost method. Good B satisfies all other applicable requirements of these Regulations. The producer self-produces Material A which is used in the production of Good B. The costs to produce Material A are the following:
Product costs:
Value of originating materials $1.00
Value of non-originating materials 7.50
Other product costs 1.50
Period costs: (including $0.20 in excluded costs) 0.50
Other costs 0.10
Total cost of Material A $10.60
Additional costs to produce Good B are the following:
Product costs:
Value of originating materials $0.00
Value of non-originating materials 5.50
Other product costs 6.50
Period costs: (including $0.20 in excluded costs) 0.50
Other costs 0.10
Total additional costs $12.60
The producer does not designate Material A as an intermediate material under subsection 7(4). The net cost of Good B is calculated as follows:
Costs of Material A (not designated as an intermediate material) Additional Costs to Produce Good B Total
Product costs:
Value of originating materials $1.00 $0.00 $1.00
Value of non-originating materials 7.50 5.50 13.00
Other product costs 1.50 6.50 8.00
Period costs (including $0.20 in excluded costs) 0.50 0.50 1.00
Other costs 0.10 0.10 0.20
Total cost of Good B $10.60 $12.60 $23.20
Excluded costs (in period costs) 0.20 0.20 −0.40
Net cost of Good B (total cost minus excluded costs) $22.80
The regional value content of Good B is calculated as follows:
The regional value content of Good B is 42.9 percent, and Good B, therefore, does not qualify as an originating good.
Situation 3
A producer located in a NAFTA country produces Good B, which is subject to a regional value-content requirement of 50 percent under the net cost method. Good B satisfies all other applicable requirements of these Regulations. The producer self-produces Material A, which is used in the production of Good B. The costs to produce Material A are the following:
Product costs:
Value of originating materials $1.00
Value of non-originating materials 7.50
Other product costs 1.50
Period costs: (including $0.20 in excluded costs) 0.50
Other costs 0.10
Total cost of Material A $10.60
Additional costs to produce Good B are the following:
Product costs:
Value of originating materials $0.00
Value of non-originating materials 5.50
Other product costs 6.50
Period costs: (including $0.20 in excluded costs) 0.50
Other costs 0.10
Total additional costs $12.60
The producer designates Material A as an intermediate material under subsection 7(4). Material A qualifies as an originating material under paragraph 4(2)(a). Therefore, the value of non-originating materials used in the production of Material A is not included in the value of non-originating materials for the purposes of calculating the regional value content of Good B. The net cost of Good B is calculated as follows:
Costs of Material A (designated as an intermediate material) Additional Costs to Produce Good B Total
Product costs:
Value of originating materials $10.60 $0.00 $10.60
Value of non-originating materials 5.50 5.50
Other product costs 6.50 6.50
Period costs (including $0.20 in excluded costs) 0.50 0.50
Other costs 0.10 0.10
Total cost of Good B $10.60 $12.60 $23.20
Excluded costs (in period costs) .20 −0.20
Net cost of Good B (total cost minus excluded costs) $23.00
The regional value content of Good B is calculated as follows:
The regional value content of Good B is 76.1 percent, and Good B, therefore, qualifies as an originating good.
Example 4: Originating Materials Acquired from a Producer Who Produced Them Using Intermediate Materials
Producer A, located in NAFTA country A, produces switches. In order for the switches to qualify as originating goods, Producer A designates subassemblies of the switches as intermediate materials. The subassemblies are subject to a regional value-content requirement. They satisfy that requirement, and qualify as originating materials. The switches are also subject to a regional value-content requirement, and, with the subassemblies designated as intermediate materials, are determined to have a regional value content of 65 percent.
Producer A sells the switches to Producer B, located in NAFTA country B, who uses them to produce switch assemblies that are used in the production of Good B. The switch assemblies are subject to a regional value-content requirement. Producers A and B are not accumulating their production within the meaning of section 14. Producer B is therefore able, under section 7(4), to designate the switch assemblies as intermediate materials.
If Producers A and B were accumulating their production within the meaning of section 14, Producer B would be unable to designate the switch assemblies as intermediate materials, because the production of both producers would be considered to be the production of one producer.
Example 5: Single Producer and Successive Designations of Materials Subject to a Regional Value-Content Requirement as Intermediate Materials
Producer A, located in NAFTA country, produces Material X and uses Material X in the production of Good B. Material X qualifies as an originating material because it satisfies the applicable regional value-content requirement. Producer A designates Material A as an intermediate material.
Producer A uses Material X in the production of Material Y, which is also used in the production of Good B. Material Y is also subject to a regional value-content requirement. Under the proviso set out in section 7(4), Producer A cannot designate Material Y as an intermediate material, even if Material Y satisfies the applicable regional value-content requirement, because Material X was already designated by Producer A as an intermediate material.
Example 6: Single Producer and Multiple Designations of Materials as Intermediate Materials
Producer X, who is located in NAFTA country X, uses non-originating materials in the production of self-produced materials A, B, and C. None of the self-produced materials are used in the production of any of the other self-produced materials.
Producer X uses the self-produced materials in the production of Good O, which is exported to NAFTA country Y. Materials A, B and C qualify as originating materials because they satisfy the applicable regional value-content requirements.
Because none of the self-produced materials are used in the production of any of the other self-produced materials, then even though each self-produced material is subject to a regional value-content requirement, Producer X may, under section 7(4), designate all of the self-produced materials as intermediate materials. The proviso set out in section 7(4) only applies where self-produced materials are used in the production of other self-produced materials and both are subject to a regional value-content requirement.
Example 7:section 7(17)
The following are examples of accessories, spare parts or tools that are delivered with a good and form part of the good's standard accessories, spare parts or tools:
(a) consumables that must be replaced at regular intervals, such as dust collectors for an air-conditioning system,
(b) a carrying case for equipment,
(c) a dust cover for a machine,
(d) an operational manual for a vehicle,
(e) brackets to attach equipment to a wall,
(f) a bicycle tool kit or a car jack,
(g) a set of wrenches to change the bit on a chuck,
(h) a brush or other tool to clean out a machine, and
(i) electrical cords and power bars for use with electronic goods.
Example 8: Value of Indirect Materials that are Assists
Producer A, located in a NAFTA country, produces Good A that is subject to a regional value-content requirement. The producer chooses that the regional value content of that good be calculated using the net cost method. Producer A buys Material X from Producer B, located in a NAFTA country, and uses it in the production of Good A. Producer A provides to Producer B, at no charge, tools to be used in the production of Material X. The tools have a value of $100 which is expensed in the current year by Producer A.
Material X is subject to a regional value-content requirement which Producer B chooses to calculate using the net cost method. For purposes of determining the value of non-originating materials in order to calculate the regional value content of Material X, the tools are considered to be an originating material because they are an indirect material. However, pursuant to section 7(11) they have a value of nil because the cost of the tools with respect to Material X is not recorded on the books of Producer B.
It is determined that Material X is a non-originating material. The cost of the tools that is recorded on the books of producer A is expensed in the current year. Pursuant to section 5 of Schedule VIII, the value of the tools (see section 5(1)(b)(ii) of Schedule VIII) must be included in the value of Material X by Producer A when calculating the regional value content of Good A. The cost of the tools, although recorded on the books of producer A, cannot be included as a separate cost in the net cost of Good A because it is already included in the value of Material X. The entire cost of Material X, which includes the cost of the tools, is included in the value of non-originating materials for purposes of the regional value content of Good A.
PART V
AUTOMOTIVE GOODS
SECTION 8. DEFINITIONS AND INTERPRETATION
For purposes of this part,
“after-market parts” means goods that are not for use as original equipment in the production of light-duty vehicles or heavy-duty vehicles and that are
(a) goods provided for in a tariff provision listed in Schedule IV, or
(b) automotive component assemblies, automotive components, sub-components or listed materials;
“class of motor vehicles” means any one of the following categories of motor vehicles:
(a) motor vehicles provided for in any of subheading 8701.20, tariff items 8702.10.30 and 8702.90.30 (vehicles for the transport of 16 or more persons), subheadings 8704.10, 8704.22, 8704.23, 8704.32 and 8704.90 and headings 8705 and 8706,
(b) motor vehicles provided for in any of subheadings 8701.10 and 8701.30 through 8701.90,
(c) motor vehicles provided for in any of tariff items 8702.10.60 and 8702.90.60 (vehicles for the transport of 15 or fewer persons) and subheadings 8704.21 and 8704.31, and
(d) motor vehicles provided for in any of subheadings 8703.21 through 8703.90;
“complete motor vehicle assembly process” means the production of a motor vehicle from separate constituent parts, which parts include the following:
(a) a structural frame or unibody,
(b) body panels,
(c) an engine, a transmission and a drive train,
(d) brake components,
(e) steering and suspension components,
(f) seating and internal trim,
(g) bumpers and external trim,
(h) wheels, and
(i) electrical and lighting components;
“first prototype” means the first motor vehicle that
(a) is produced using tooling and processes intended for the production of motor vehicles to be offered for sale, and
(b) follows the complete motor vehicle assembly process in a manner not specifically designed for testing purposes;
“floor pan of a motor vehicle” means a component, comprising a single part or two or more parts joined together, with or without additional stiffening members, that forms the base of a motor vehicle, beginning at the firewall or bulkhead of the motor vehicle and ending
(a) where there is a luggage floor panel in the motor vehicle, at the place where that luggage floor panel begins, and
(b) where there is no luggage floor panel in the motor vehicle, at the place where the passenger compartment of the motor vehicle ends;
“heavy-duty automotive good” means a heavy-duty vehicle or a heavy-duty component;
“heavy-duty component” means an automotive component or automotive component assembly that is for use as original equipment in the production of a heavy-duty vehicle;
“marque” means a trade name used by a marketing division of a motor vehicle assembler that is separate from any other marketing division of that motor vehicle assembler;
“model line” means a group of motor vehicles having the same platform or model name;
“model name” means the word, group of words, letter, number or similar designation assigned to a motor vehicle by a marketing division of a motor vehicle assembler
(a) to differentiate the motor vehicle from other motor vehicles that use the same platform design,
(b) to associate the motor vehicle with other motor vehicles that use different platform designs, or
(c) to denote a platform design;
“new building” means a new construction to house a complete motor vehicle assembly process, where that construction includes the pouring or construction of a new foundation and floor, the erection of a new frame and roof, and the installation of new plumbing and electrical and other utilities;
“plant” means a building, or buildings in close proximity but not necessarily contiguous, machinery, apparatus and fixtures that are under the control of a producer and are used in the production of any of the following:
(a) light-duty vehicles and heavy-duty vehicles,
(b) goods of a tariff provision listed in Schedule IV, and
(c) automotive component assemblies, automotive components, sub-components and listed materials;
“platform” means the primary load-bearing structural assembly of a motor vehicle that determines the basic size of the motor vehicle, and is the structural base that supports the driveline and links the suspension components of the motor vehicle for various types of frames, such as the body-on-frame or space-frame, and monocoques;
“received in the territory of a NAFTA country” means, with respect to section 9(2), the location at which a traced material arrives in the territory of a NAFTA country and is documented for any customs purpose, which, in the case of a traced material imported into
(a) Canada,
(i) where the traced material is imported on a vessel, as defined in section 2 of the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations, is the location at which the traced material is last unloaded from the vessel and reported, under section 12 of the Customs Act, to a customs office, including reported for transportation under bond by a conveyance other than that vessel, and
(ii) in any other case, is the location at which the traced material is reported, under section 12 of the Customs Act, to a customs office, including reported for transportation under bond,
(b) Mexico,
(i) where the traced material is imported on a vessel, the location at which the traced material is last unloaded from the vessel and reported for any customs purpose, and
(ii) in any other case, the location at which the traced material is reported for any customs purpose, and
(c) the United States, is the location at which the traced material is entered for any customs purpose, including entered for consumption, entered for warehouse or entered for transportation under bond, or admitted into a foreign trade zone;
“refit” means a closure of a plant for a period of at least three consecutive months that is for purposes of plant conversion or retooling;
“size category”, with respect to a light-duty vehicle, means that the total of the interior volume for passengers and the interior volume for luggage is
(a) 85 cubic feet (2.38 m3) or less,
(b) more than 85 cubic feet (2.38 m3) but less than 100 cubic feet (2.80 m3),
(c) 100 cubic feet (2.80 m3) or more but not more than 110 cubic feet (3.08 m3),
(d) more than 110 cubic feet (3.08 m3) but less than 120 cubic feet (3.36 m3), or
(e) 120 cubic feet (3.36 m3) or more;
“traced material” means a material, produced outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, that is imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries and is, when imported, of a tariff provision listed in Schedule IV;
“underbody” means the floor pan of a motor vehicle.
SECTION 9. LIGHT-DUTY AUTOMOTIVE GOODS
VNM determined by tracing of certain non-originating materials
(1) For purposes of calculating the regional value content of a light-duty automotive good under the net cost method, the value of non-originating materials used by the producer in the production of the good shall be the sum of the values of the non-originating materials that are traced materials and are incorporated into the good.
Valuation of traced materials for VNM in the RVC
(2) Except as otherwise provided in subsections (3) and (6) through (8), the value of each of the traced materials that is incorporated into a good shall be
(a) where the producer imports the traced material from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries and has or takes title to it at the time of importation, the sum of
(i) the customs value of the traced material,
(ii) where not included in that customs value, any freight, insurance, packing and other costs that were incurred in transporting the traced material to the first place at which it was received in the territory of a NAFTA country, and
(iii) where not included in that customs value, the costs referred to in subsection (4);
(b) where the producer imports the traced material from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries and does not have or take title to it at the time of importation, the sum of
(i) the customs value of the traced material,
(ii) where not included in that customs value, any freight, insurance, packing and other costs that were incurred in transporting the traced material to the place at which it was when the producer takes title in the territory of a NAFTA country, and
(iii) where not included in that customs value, the costs referred to in subsection (4);
(c) where a person other than the producer imports the traced material from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries and that person has or takes title to the material at the time of importation, if the producer has a statement that
(i) is signed by the person from whom the producer acquired the traced material, whether in the form in which it was imported into the territory of a NAFTA country or incorporated into another material, and
(ii) states
(A) the customs value of the traced material,
(B) where not included in that customs value, any freight, insurance, packing and other costs that were incurred in transporting the traced material to the first place at which it was received in the territory of a NAFTA country, and
(C) where not included in that customs value, the costs referred to in subsection (4),
the sum of the customs value of the traced material, the freight, insurance, packing and other costs referred to in subparagraph (ii)(B) and the costs referred to in subparagraph (ii)(C);
(d) where a person other than the producer imports the traced material from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries and that person does not have or take title to the material at the time of importation, if the producer has a statement that
(i) is signed by the person from whom the producer acquired the traced material, whether in the form in which it was imported into the territory of a NAFTA country or incorporated into another material, and
(ii) states
(A) the customs value of the traced material,
(B) where not included in that customs value, any freight, insurance, packing and other costs that were incurred in transporting the traced material to the place at which it was located when the first person in the territory of a NAFTA country takes title, and
(C) where not included in that customs value, the costs referred to in subsection (4),
the sum of the customs value of the traced material, the freight, insurance, packing and other costs referred to in subparagraph (ii)(B) and the costs referred to in subparagraph (ii)(C);
(e) where a person other than the producer imports the traced material from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries and the producer acquires the traced material or a material that incorporates the traced material from a person in the territory of a NAFTA country who has title to it, if the producer has a statement that
(i) is signed by the person from whom the producer acquired the traced material or the material that incorporates it, and
(ii) states the value of the traced material or a material that incorporates the traced material, determined in accordance with subsection (5), with respect to a transaction that occurs after the customs value of the traced material was determined,
the value of the traced material or the material that incorporates the traced material, determined in accordance with subsection (5), with respect to the transaction referred to in that statement;
(f) where a person other than the producer imports the traced material from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, and the producer acquires a material that incorporates that traced material and the acquired material was produced in the territory of a NAFTA country and is subject to a regional value-content requirement, if the producer has a statement that
(i) is signed by the person from whom the producer acquired that material, and
(ii) states that the acquired material is an originating material and states the regional value content of the material,
an amount equal to VM × (1 − RVC)
where
VM is the value of the acquired material, determined in accordance with subsection (5), with respect to the transaction in which the producer acquired that material, and
RVC is the regional value content of the acquired material, expressed as a decimal;
(g) where a person other than the producer imports the traced material from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, and the producer acquires a material that incorporates that traced material and the acquired material was produced in the territory of a NAFTA country and is subject to a regional value-content requirement, if the producer has a statement that
(i) is signed by the person from whom the producer acquired that material, and
(ii) states that the acquired material is an originating material but does not state any value with respect to the traced material,
an amount equal to VM × (1 − RVCR)
where
VM is the value of the acquired material, determined in accordance with subsection (5), with respect to the transaction in which the producer acquired that material, and
RVCR is the regional value-content requirement for the acquired material, expressed as a decimal;
(h) where a person other than the producer imports the traced material from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries and the producer acquires a material that
(i) incorporates that traced material,
(ii) was produced in the territory of a NAFTA country, and
(iii) with respect to which an amount was determined in accordance with paragraph (f) or (g),
if the producer of the good has a statement signed by the person from whom the producer acquired that material that states that amount, the amount as determined in accordance with paragraph (f) or (g), as the case may be; and
(i) where a person other than the producer imports the traced material from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries and the producer does not have a statement described in any of paragraphs (c) through (h), the value of the traced material or any material that incorporates it, determined in accordance with subsection (5) with respect to the transaction in which the producer acquires the traced material or any material that incorporates it.
Value of traced material if customs value is not in accordance with Schedule VIII
(3) For purposes of subsections (2) (a) through (d), where the customs value of the traced material referred to in those paragraphs was not determined in a manner consistent with Schedule VIII, the value of the material shall be the sum of
(a) the value of the material determined in accordance with Schedule VIII with respect to the transaction in which the person who imported the material from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries acquired it; and
(b) where not included in that value, the costs referred to in subsections (2)(a) (ii) and (iii), subsections (2)(b) (ii) and (iii), subsections (2)(c)(ii) (B) and (C) or subsections (2)(d)(ii) (B) and (C), as the case may be.
Additional costs included in traced value if not already included in customs value
(4) The costs referred to in subsections (2) (a) through (d) and subsection (3) are the following:
(a) duties and taxes paid or payable with respect to the material in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries, other than duties and taxes that are waived, refunded, refundable or otherwise recoverable, including credit against duty or tax paid or payable; and
(b) customs brokerage fees, including the cost of in-house customs brokerage services, incurred with respect to the material in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries.
Value of traced material determined under Schedule VIII if value is not customs value
(5) For purposes of subsections (2) (e) through (g) and (i) and subsections (6) and (7), the value of a material
(a) shall be the transaction value of the material, determined in accordance with section 2(1) of Schedule VIII with respect to the transaction referred to in that paragraph or subsection, or
(b) shall be determined in accordance with sections 6 through 11 of Schedule VIII, where, with respect to the transaction referred to in that paragraph or subsection, there is no transaction value for the material under section 2(2) of that Schedule, or the transaction value of the material is unacceptable under section 2(3) of that Schedule,
and, where not included under paragraph (a) or (b), shall include taxes, other than duties paid on an importation of a material from a NAFTA country, paid or payable with respect to the material in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries, other than taxes that are waived, refunded, refundable or otherwise recoverable, including credit against tax paid or payable.
(6) Where it is determined, during the course of a verification of origin of a light-duty automotive good with respect to which the producer of that good has a statement referred to in subsection (2) (f) or (g), that the acquired material referred to in that statement is not an originating material, the value of the acquired material shall, for purposes of subsection (2), be determined in accordance with subsection (5) with respect to the transaction in which that producer acquired it.
Effect on value of traced material if value on a statement cannot be verified
(7) Where any person who has information with respect to a statement referred to in any of subsections (2)(c) through (h) does not allow a customs administration to verify that information during a verification of origin, the value of the material with respect to which that person did not allow the customs administration to verify the information may be determined by that customs administration in accordance with subsection (5) with respect to the transaction in which that person sells, or otherwise transfers to another person, that material or a material that incorporates that material.
Use of value of VNM as determined under section 12(3) for traced material incorporated into another material
(8) Where a traced material is incorporated into a material produced in the territory of a NAFTA country and that material is incorporated into a light-duty automotive good, the statement referred to in subsection (2)(c), (d) or (e) may state the value of non-originating materials, determined in accordance with section 12(3), with respect to the material that incorporates the traced material.
Interpretations and clarifications for provisions applicable to tracing rules for light-duty automotive goods
(9) For purposes of this section,
(a) where a producer, in accordance with section 7(4), designates as an intermediate material any self-produced material used in the production of a light-duty automotive good,
(i) the designation applies solely to the calculation of the net cost of that good, and
(ii) the value of a traced material that is incorporated into that good shall be determined as though the designation had not been made;
(b) the value of a material not listed in Schedule IV, when imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries,
(i) shall not be included in the value of non-originating materials that are used in the production of a light-duty automotive good, and
(ii) shall be included in calculating the net cost of a light-duty automotive good that incorporates that material;
(c) except as otherwise provided in section 12(10), this section does not apply with respect to after-market parts;
(d) the costs referred to in subsections (2)(a)(ii) and (b)(ii), subsections (2)(c)(ii)(B) and (d)(ii)(B) and subsections (4) and (5) shall be the costs referred to in those paragraphs that are recorded on the books of the producer of the light-duty automotive good;
(e) for purposes of calculating the regional value content of a light-duty automotive good, the producer of that good may choose to treat any material used in the production of that good as a non-originating material, and the value of that material shall be determined in accordance with subsection (5) with respect to the transaction in which the producer acquired it; and
(f) any information set out in a statement referred to in subsection (2) that concerns the value of materials or costs shall be in the same currency as the currency of the country in which the person who provided the statement is located.
Examples of application of tracing for light-duty automotive goods
(10) Each of the following examples is an “Example” as referred to in section 2(4).
Example 1:
Nuts and bolts provided for in heading 7318 are imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries and are used in the territory of a NAFTA country in the production of a light-duty automotive good referred to in section 9(1). Heading 7318 is not listed in Schedule IV so the nuts and bolts are not traced materials.
Because the nuts and bolts are not traced materials the value, under section 9(1), of the nuts and bolts is not included in the value of non-originating materials used in the light-duty automotive good even though the nuts and bolts are imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries.
The value, under section 9(9)(b), of the nuts and bolts is included in the net cost of the light-duty automotive good for the purposes of calculating, under section 9(1), regional value content of the motor vehicle.
Example 2:
A rear view mirror provided for in subheading 7009.10 is imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries and is used in the territory of a NAFTA country as original equipment in the production of a light-duty vehicle.
Subheading 7009.10 is listed in Schedule IV. The rear view mirror is a traced material. For purposes of calculating, under section 9(1), regional value content of the light-duty vehicle, the value of the mirror is included in the value of non-originating materials in accordance with sections 9(2) through (9).
Example 3:
Glass provided for in heading 7005 is imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries and is used in the territory of NAFTA country A in the production of a rear view mirror. The rear view mirror is a non-originating good because it fails to satisfy the applicable change in tariff classification.
That rear view mirror is exported to NAFTA country B where it is used as original equipment in the production of a light-duty vehicle. Even though the rear view mirror is a non-originating material and is provided for in a tariff item listed in Schedule IV, it is not a traced material because it was not imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries.
For purposes of calculating, under section 9(1), the regional value content of a light-duty vehicle in which the rear view mirror is incorporated, the value of the rear view mirror, under section 9(1), is not included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the light-duty vehicle.
Even though the glass provided for in heading 7005 that was used in the production of the rear view mirror and incorporated into the light-duty vehicle was imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, the glass is not a traced material because heading 7005 is not listed in Schedule IV. For purposes of calculating, under section 9(1), the regional value content of the light-duty vehicle that incorporates the glass, the value of the glass is not included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the light-duty vehicle. The value of the rear view mirror would be included in the net cost of the light-duty vehicle, but the value of the imported glass would not be separately included in the value of non-originating materials of the light-duty vehicle.
Example 4:
An electric motor provided for in subheading 8501.10 is imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries and is used in the territory of a NAFTA country in the production of a seat frame provided for in subheading 9401.90. The seat frame, with the electric motor attached, is sold to a producer of seats provided for in subheading 9401.20. The seat producer sells the seat to a producer of light-duty vehicles. The seat is to be used as original equipment in the production of that light-duty vehicle.
Subheadings 8501.10 and 9401.20 are listed in Schedule IV; subheading 9401.90 is not. The electric motor is a traced material; the seat is not a traced material because it was not imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries.
The seat is a light-duty automotive good referred to in section 9(1). For purposes of calculating, under section 9(1), the regional value content of the seat, the value of traced materials incorporated into it is included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the seat. The value of the electric motor is included in that value. (However, the value of the motor would not be included separately in the net cost of the seat because the value of the motor is included as part of the cost of the seat frame.)
For purposes of calculating, under section 9(1), the regional value content of the light-duty vehicle, the value of the electric motor is included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the light-duty vehicle, even if the seat is an originating material.
Example 5:
Cast blocks, cast heads and connecting rod assemblies provided for in heading 8409 are imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries by an engine producer, who has title to them at the time of importation, and are used by the producer in the territory of NAFTA country A in the production of an engine provided for in heading 8407. After the regional value content of the engine is calculated, the engine is an originating good. It is not a traced material because it was not imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries. The engine is exported to NAFTA country B, to be used as original equipment by a producer of light-duty vehicles.
For purposes of calculating, under section 9(1), the regional value content of the light-duty vehicle that incorporates the engine, because heading 8409 is listed in Schedule IV and because the cast blocks, cast heads and connecting rod assemblies were imported into the territory of a NAFTA country and are incorporated into the light-duty vehicle, the value of those materials, which are traced materials, is included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the light-duty vehicle, even though the engine is an originating material.
The producer of the light-duty vehicle did not import the traced materials. However, because that producer has a statement referred to in section 9(2)(c) and that statement states the value of non-originating materials of the traced materials in accordance with section 12(2), the producer of the light-duty vehicle may, in accordance with section 9(8), use that value as the value of non-originating materials of the light-duty vehicle with respect to that engine.
Example 6:
Aluminum ingots provided for in subheading 7601.10 and piston assemblies provided for in heading 8409 are imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries by an engine producer and are used by that producer in the territory of NAFTA country A in the production of an engine provided for in heading 8407. The aluminum ingots are used by the producer to produce an engine block; the piston assembly is then incorporated into the engine block and the producer designates, in accordance with section 7(4), a short block provided for in heading 8409 as an intermediate material. The intermediate material qualifies as an originating material. The engine that incorporates the short block is exported to NAFTA country B and used as original equipment in the production of a light-duty vehicle. The piston assemblies provided for in heading 8409 are traced materials; neither the engine nor the short block are traced materials because they were not imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries.
For purposes of calculating, under section 9(1), the regional value content of the engine, the value of the piston assemblies is included, under section 9(9)(a)(ii), in the value of non-originating materials, even if the intermediate material is an originating material. However, the value of the aluminum ingots is not included in the value of non-originating materials because subheading 7601.10 is not listed in Schedule IV. The value of the aluminum ingots does not need to be included separately in the net cost of the engine because that value is included in the value of the intermediate material, and the total cost of the intermediate material is included in the net cost of the engine.
For purposes of calculating, under section 9(1), the regional value content of the light-duty vehicle that incorporates the engine (and the piston assemblies), the value of the piston assemblies incorporated into that light-duty vehicle is included in the value of non-originating materials of the light-duty vehicle.
Example 7:
An engine provided for in heading 8407 is imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries. The producer of the engine, located in the country from which the engine is imported, used in the production of the engine a piston assembly provided for in heading 8409 that was produced in a NAFTA country and is an originating good. The engine is used in the territory of a NAFTA country as original equipment in the production of a light-duty vehicle. The engine is a traced material.
For purposes of calculating, under section 9(1), the regional value content of a light-duty vehicle that incorporates that engine, the value of the engine is included in the value of non-originating materials of that light-duty vehicle. The value of the piston assembly, which was, before its exportation to outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, an originating good, shall not be deducted from the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the light-duty vehicle. Under section 18 (transshipment), the piston assembly is no longer considered to be an originating good because it was used in the production of a good outside the territories of the NAFTA countries.
Example 8:
A wholesaler, located in City A in the territory of a NAFTA country, imports from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries rubber hoses provided for in heading 4009, which is listed in Schedule IV. The wholesaler takes title to the goods at the wholesaler's place of business in City A. The customs value of the imported goods is $500. All freight, taxes and duties associated with the good to the wholesaler's place of business total $100; the cost of the freight, included in that $100, from the place where it was received in the territory of a NAFTA country to the location of the wholesaler's place of business in City A is $25. The wholesaler sells the rubber hoses for $650 to a producer of light-duty vehicles who uses the goods in the territory of a NAFTA country as original equipment in the production of a light-duty vehicle. The light-duty vehicle producer pays $50 to have the goods shipped from the location of the wholesaler's place of business in City A to the location at which the light-duty vehicle is produced.
The rubber hoses are traced materials and they are incorporated into a light-duty automotive good. For purposes of calculating, under section 9(1), the regional value content of the light-duty vehicle,
(1) if the wholesaler takes title to the goods before the first place at which they were received in the territory of a NAFTA country, then the value of non-originating materials, where the light-duty vehicle producer has a statement referred to in section 9(2)(c), would not include the cost of freight from the place where they were received in the territory of a NAFTA country to the location of the wholesaler's place of business: in this situation, the value of non-originating materials would be $575;
(2) if the producer has a statement referred to in section 9(2)(d) that states the customs value of the traced material and, where not included in that price, the cost of taxes, duties, fees and transporting the goods to the place where title is taken, the light-duty vehicle producer may use those values as the value of non-originating materials with respect to the goods: in this situation, the value of non-originating materials would be $600; or
(3) if the wholesaler is unwilling to provide the light-duty vehicle producer with such a statement, the value of non-originating materials with respect to the traced materials will be the value of the materials with respect to the transaction in which the producer acquired them, as provided for in section 9(2)(i), in this instance $650; the costs of transporting the goods from the location of the wholesaler's place of business to the location of the producer will be included in the net cost of the goods, but not in the value of non-originating materials.
Example 9:
A wholesaler, located in City A in the territory of a NAFTA country, imports from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries rubber hose provided for in heading 4009, which is listed in Schedule IV. The wholesaler sells the good to a producer located in the territory of the NAFTA country who uses the hose to produce a power steering hose assembly, also provided for in heading 4009. The power steering hose assembly is then sold to a producer of light-duty vehicles who uses that good in the production of a light-duty vehicle. The rubber hose is a traced material; the power steering hose assembly is not a traced material because it was not imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries.
The wholesaler who imported the rubber hose from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries has title to it at the time of importation. The customs value of the good is $3, including freight and insurance and all other costs incurred in transporting the good to the first place at which it was received in the territory of the NAFTA country. Duties and fees and all other costs referred to in section 9(4), paid by the wholesaler with respect to the good, total an additional $1. The wholesaler sells the good to the producer of the power steering hose assemblies for $5, not including freight to the location of that producer. The power steering hose producer pays $2 to have the good delivered to the location of production. The value of the power steering hose assembly sold to the light-duty vehicle producer is $10, including freight for delivery of the goods to the location of the light-duty vehicle producer.
For purposes of calculating, under section 9(1), the regional value content of the light-duty vehicle:
(1) if the motor vehicle producer has a statement referred to in section 9(2)(c) from the producer of the power steering hose assembly that states the customs value of the imported rubber hose incorporated in the power steering hose assembly, and the value of the duties, fees and other costs referred to in section 9(4), the producer may use those values as the value of non-originating materials with respect to that traced good: in this situation, that value would be the customs value of $3 and the cost of duties and fees of $1, provided that the wholesaler has provided the producer of the power steering hose assembly with the information regarding the customs value of the imported good and the other costs;
(2) if the light-duty vehicle producer has a statement from the producer of the power steering hose assembly that states the value of the imported hose, with respect to the transaction in which the power steering hose assembly producer acquires the imported hose from the wholesaler, the light-duty vehicle producer may include that value as the value of non-originating materials, in accordance with section 9(2)(e): in this situation, that value is $5; and the $2 cost of transporting the good from the location of the wholesaler to the location of the producer, because that cost is separately identified, would not be included in the value of non-originating materials of the light-duty vehicle;
(3) if the light-duty vehicle producer has a statement referred to in section 9(2)(f) signed by the producer of the power steering hose assembly, the light-duty vehicle producer may use the formula set out in section 9(2)(f) to calculate the value of non-originating materials with respect to that acquired material: in this situation, assuming the regional value content is 55 per cent, the value of non-originating materials would be $4.50; and because the cost of transportation from the location of the producer of the power steering hose assembly to the location of the light-duty vehicle producer is included in the purchase price and not separately identified, it may not be deducted from the purchase price, because the formula referred to in section 9(2)(f) does not allow for the deduction of transportation costs that would otherwise not be non-originating;
(4) if the light-duty vehicle producer has a statement referred to in section 9(2)(g) signed by the producer of the power steering hose assembly, the light-duty vehicle producer may use the formula set out in section 9(2)(g) to calculate the value of non-originating materials with respect to that acquired material: in this situation, assuming the regional value-content requirement is 50 per cent, the value of non-originating materials would be $5; and because the cost of transportation from the location of the producer of the power steering hose assembly to the location of the light-duty vehicle producer is included in the purchase price and not separately identified, it may not be deducted from the purchase price, because the formula referred to in section 9(2)(g) does not allow for the deduction of transportation costs that would otherwise not be non-originating; or
(5) if the light-duty vehicle producer does not have a statement referred to in any of sections 9(2)(c) through (h) from the producer of the power steering hose assembly, the light-duty vehicle producer includes in the value of non-originating materials of the vehicles the value, determined in accordance with section 9(2)(i), of the power steering hose assembly: in this situation, that amount would be $10, the cost to the producer of acquiring that material.
Example 10:
A producer of light-duty vehicles located in City C in the territory of a NAFTA country imports from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries rubber hose provided for in heading 4009, which is listed in Schedule IV, and uses that good as original equipment in the production of a light-duty vehicle.
The rubber hose arrives at City A in the NAFTA country, but the producer of the light-duty vehicle does not have title to the good; it is transported under bond to City B, and on its arrival in City B, the producer of the light-duty vehicle takes title to it and the good is received in the territory of a NAFTA country. The good is then transported to the location of the light-duty vehicle producer in City C.
The customs value of the imported good is $4, the transportation and other costs referred to in subparagraph 9(2)(b)(ii) to City A are $3 and to City B are $2, and the cost of duties, taxes and other fees referred to in section 9(4) is $1. The cost of transporting the good from City B to the location of the producer in City C is $1. The rubber hose is traced material.
For purposes of calculating, under section 9(1), the regional value content of the light-duty vehicle, the value, under section 9(2)(b), of non-originating materials of that vehicle is the customs value of the traced material and, where not included in that value, the cost of taxes, duties, fees and the cost of transporting the traced material to the place where title is taken. In this situation, the value of non-originating materials would be the customs value of the traced material, $4, the cost of duties taxes and other fees, $1, the cost of transporting the material to City A, $3, and the cost of transporting that material from City A to City B, $2, for a total of $10. The $1 cost of transporting the good from City B to the location of the producer in City C would not be included in the value of non-originating materials of the light-duty vehicle because a person of a NAFTA country has taken title to the traced material.
Example 11:
A radiator provided for in subheading 8708.91 is imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries by a producer of light-duty vehicles and is used in the territory of a NAFTA country as original equipment in the production of a light-duty vehicle.
The radiator is transported by ship from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries and arrives in the territory of the NAFTA country at City A. The radiator is not, however, unloaded at City A and although the radiator is physically present in the territory of the NAFTA country, it has not been received in the territory of a NAFTA country.
The ship sails in territorial waters from City A to City B and the radiator is unloaded there. The light-duty vehicle producer files, from City C in the same country, the entry for the radiator; the radiator enters the territory of the NAFTA country at City B.
Subheading 8708.91 is listed in Schedule IV. The radiator is a traced material.
For purposes of calculating, under section 9(1), the regional value content of the light-duty vehicle, the value of the radiator is included in the value of non-originating materials of the light-duty vehicle. The costs of any freight, insurance, packing and other costs incurred in transporting the radiator to City B are included in the value of non-originating materials of the light-duty vehicle, including the cost of transporting the radiator from City A to City B. The costs of any freight, insurance, packing and other costs that were incurred in transporting the radiator from City B to the location of the producer are not included in the value of non-originating materials of the light-duty vehicle.
Example 12:
Producer X, located in NAFTA country A, produces a car seat of subheading No. 9401.20 that is used in the production of a light-duty vehicle. The only non-originating material used in the production of the car seat is an electric motor of subheading No. 8501.20 that was imported by Producer X from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries. The electric motor is a material of a tariff provision listed in Schedule IV and thus is a traced material.
Producer X sells the car seat as original equipment to Producer Y, a light-duty vehicle producer, located in NAFTA country B. The car seat is an originating good because the non-originating material in the car seat (the electric motor) undergoes the applicable change in tariff classification set out in a rule that specifies only a change in tariff classification. Consequently, Producer X does not choose to calculate the regional value content of the car seat in accordance with section 12(1).
For purposes of determining, under section 9(1), the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the light-duty vehicle that incorporates the car seat, the value of the electric motor is included even though the car seat qualifies as an originating material.
Producer X provides Producer Y with a statement described in section 9(2)(c), with the value of non-originating material used in the production of the car seat determined in accordance with section 12(3), as is permitted by section 9(8). Producer Y uses that value as the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the light-duty vehicle with respect to the car seat.
Example 13:
This example has the same facts as in Example 12, except that the car seat does not qualify as an originating good under the rule that specifies only a change in tariff classification. Instead, it qualifies as an originating good under a rule that specifies a regional value-content requirement and a change in tariff classification. For purposes of that rule, Producer X chose to calculate the regional value content of the car seat in accordance with section 12(1) over a period set out in section 12(5)(a) and using a category set out in section 12(4)(a).
For purposes of the statement described in section 9(2)(c), Producer X determined, as is permitted under section 9(8), the value of non-originating material used in the production of the car seat in accordance with section 12(3) over a period set out in section 12(5)(a) and using a category set out in section 12(4)(e).
SECTION 10. HEAVY-DUTY AUTOMOTIVE GOODS
Determining VNM for the calculation of the RVC for heavy-duty automotive goods
(1) Except as otherwise provided in subsections (3) through (8) and section 12(10)(a), for purposes of calculating the regional value content of a heavy-duty automotive good under the net cost method, the value of non-originating materials used by the producer of the good in the production of the good shall be the sum of
(a) for each listed material that is a non-originating material, is a self-produced material and is used by the producer in the production of the good, at the choice of the producer, either
(i) the total cost incurred with respect to all goods produced by the producer that can be reasonably allocated to that listed material in accordance with Schedule VII,
(ii) the aggregate of each cost that forms part of the total cost incurred with respect to that listed material that can be reasonably allocated to that listed material in accordance with Schedule VII, or
(iii) the sum of
(A) the customs value of each non-originating material imported by the producer and used in the production of the listed material, and, where not included in that customs value, the costs referred to in subsections (2)(c) through (f), and
(B) the value of each non-originating material that is not imported by the producer of the listed material and is used in the production of the listed material, determined in accordance with subsection (2) with respect to the transaction in which the producer of the listed material acquired it;
(b) for each listed material that is a non-originating material, is produced in the territory of a NAFTA country and is acquired and used by the producer in the production of the good, at the choice of the producer, either
(i) the value of that non-originating listed material, determined in accordance with subsection (2), with respect to the transaction in which the producer acquired the listed material, or
(ii) where the producer of the good has a statement described in clause (A) or (B) with respect to each material that is a non-originating material used in the production of that listed material, the sum of
(A) the customs value of each non-originating material imported by the producer of the listed material and used in the production of that listed material, and, where not included in that customs value, the costs referred to in subsections (2)(c) through (f), if the producer of the good has a statement signed by the producer of the listed material that states the customs value of that non-originating material and the costs referred to in subsections (2)(c) through (f) that the producer of the listed material incurred with respect to the non-originating material, and
(B) the value of each non-originating material that is not imported by the producer of the listed material, and is acquired and used in the production of the listed material, determined in accordance with subsection (2) with respect to the transaction in which the producer of the listed material acquired that non-originating material, if the producer of the good has a statement signed by the producer of the listed material that states the value of the acquired material, determined in accordance with subsection (2) with respect to the transaction in which the producer of the listed material acquired the non-originating material;
(c) for each listed material, automotive component assembly, automotive component or sub-component that is imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, and is used by the producer in the production of the good,
(i) where it is imported by the producer, the customs value of that non-originating listed material, automotive component assembly, automotive component or sub-component, and, where not included in that customs value, the costs referred to in subsections (2)(c) through (f), and
(ii) where it is not imported by the producer, the value of that non-originating listed material, automotive component assembly, automotive component or sub-component, determined in accordance with subsection (2) with respect to the transaction in which the producer acquired it;
(d) for each automotive component assembly, automotive component or sub-component that is an originating material and is acquired and used by the producer in the production of the good, at the choice of the producer,
(i) the sum of
(A) the value of each non-originating listed material used in the production of the originating material, determined under paragraphs (a) and (b),
(B) the value of each non-originating material incorporated into the originating material, determined under paragraph (c),
(C) the value of each non-originating listed material used in the production of a material referred to in paragraph (e) that is used in the production of the originating material, determined under paragraphs (a) and (b), and
(D) where the value of a non-originating listed material referred to in clause (C), and used in the production of a non-originating automotive component assembly, automotive component or sub-component that is used in the production of the originating material, is not included under clause (C), the value of that automotive component assembly, automotive component or sub-component, determined under paragraph (e)(ii),
if the producer has a statement, signed by the person from whom the originating material was acquired, that states the sum of the values, as determined by the producer of the originating material under paragraphs (a), (b), (c) and (e) of each non-originating material referred to in any of clauses (A) through (D) that is incorporated into that originating material;
(ii) an amount equal to the number resulting from applying the following formula:
VM × (1 − RVC)
where
VM is the value of the acquired material, determined in accordance with subsection (2), with respect to the transaction in which the producer of the good acquired that material, and
RVC is the regional value content of the acquired material, expressed as a decimal,
if the material is subject to a regional value-content requirement and the producer has a statement, signed by the person from whom the producer acquired that material, that states that the acquired material is an originating material and states the regional value content of the material,
(iii) an amount equal to the number resulting from applying the following formula:
VM × (1 − RVCR)
where
VM is the value of the acquired material, determined in accordance with subsection (2), with respect to the transaction in which the producer of the good acquired that material, and
RVCR is the regional value-content requirement for the acquired material, expressed as a decimal,
if the material is subject to a regional value-content requirement and the producer has a statement, signed by the person from whom the producer acquired that material, that states that the acquired material is an originating material but does not state the value of non-originating materials with respect to that acquired material; or
(iv) the value of that automotive component assembly, automotive component or sub-component determined in accordance with subsection (2) with respect to the transaction in which the producer acquired the material;
(e) for each automotive component assembly, automotive component or sub-component that is a non-originating material produced in the territory of a NAFTA country and that is acquired by the producer and used by the producer in the production of the good, at the choice of the producer, either
(i) the sum of the values of the non-originating materials incorporated into that non-originating material that is acquired by the producer, determined under paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d) and (f), if the producer has a statement, signed by the person from whom the non-originating material was acquired, that states the sum of the values of the non-originating materials incorporated into that non-originating material, determined by the producer of the non-originating material in accordance with paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d) and (f), or
(ii) the value of that non-originating automotive component assembly, automotive component or sub-component, determined in accordance with subsection (2) with respect to the transaction in which the producer acquired the material; and
(f) for each non-originating material that is not referred to in paragraph (a), (b), (c) or (e) and that is used by the producer in the production of the good,
(i) where it is imported by the producer, the customs value of that non-originating material, and, where not included in that customs value, the costs referred to in subsections (2)(c) through (f), and
(ii) where it is not imported by the producer, the value of that non-originating material, determined in accordance with subsection (2) with respect to the transaction in which the producer acquired the material.
Application of Schedule VIII to determine VNM; additional costs to be included
(2) For purposes of subsection (1)(a)(ii)(B), subsection (1)(b)(i), subsection (1)(b)(ii)(B), subsections (1)(c)(ii), (1)(d)(ii) through (iv), (1)(e)(ii) and subsection (1)(f)(ii), the value of a material
(a) shall be the transaction value of the material, determined in accordance with section 2(1) of Schedule VIII with respect to the transaction referred to in that clause, subparagraph or paragraph, or
(b) where, with respect to the transaction referred to in that clause, subparagraph, or paragraph, there is no transaction value for the material under section 2(2) of Schedule VIII or the transaction value of the material is unacceptable under section 2(3) of that Schedule, shall be determined in accordance with sections 6 through 11 of that Schedule,
and shall include the following costs where they are not included under paragraph (a) or (b):
(c) the costs of freight, insurance and packing, and all other costs incurred in transporting the material to the location of the producer,
(d) duties and taxes paid or payable with respect to the material in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries, other than duties and taxes that are waived, refunded, refundable or otherwise recoverable, including credit against duty or tax paid or payable,
(e) customs brokerage fees, including the cost of in-house customs brokerage and customs clearance services, incurred with respect to the material in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries, and
(f) the cost of waste and spoilage resulting from the use of the material in the production of the good, minus the value of any reusable scrap or by-product.
Value of imported material if customs value is not in accordance with Schedule VIII
(3) For purposes of subsections (1)(a)(ii)(A) and (b)(ii)(A) and subsections (1)(c)(i) and (f)(i), where the customs value of an imported material referred to in those clauses or paragraphs was not determined in a manner consistent with Schedule VIII, the value of the material shall be determined in accordance with Schedule VIII with respect to the importation for which that customs value was determined and, where the costs referred to in sections (2)(c) through (f) are not included in that value, those costs shall be added to the value of the material.
Option to use section 9 tracing rules in certain circumstances
(4) For purposes of calculating the regional value content of a heavy-duty component, where
(a) a heavy-duty component is produced in the same plant as an automotive component assembly or automotive component that is of the same heading or subheading as that heavy-duty component and is for use as original equipment in a light-duty vehicle, and
(b) it is not reasonable for the producer to know which of the production will constitute a heavy-duty component for use in a heavy-duty vehicle,
the value of the non-originating materials used in the production of the heavy-duty component in that plant may, at the choice of the producer, be determined in the manner set out in section 9.
(5) For purposes of calculating the regional value content of a heavy-duty vehicle, where a producer of such a vehicle acquires, for use by that producer in the production of the vehicle, a heavy-duty component with respect to which the value of non-originating materials has been determined in accordance with subsection (4), the value of the non-originating materials used by the producer with respect to that heavy-duty component is the value of non-originating materials determined under that subsection.
VNM may be redetermined for certain acquired materials
(6) Where it is determined, during the course of a verification of origin of a heavy-duty automotive good with respect to which the producer of that good has a statement referred to in subsection (1)(d)(ii) or (iii) that the acquired material referred to in that statement is not an originating material, the value of the acquired material shall, for purposes of subsection (1), be determined in accordance with subsection (2) with respect to the transaction in which that producer acquired it.
Effect on value of traced material if value on a statement cannot be verified
(7) Where any person who has information with respect to a statement referred to in subsection (1)(b)(ii), (d)(i) or (e)(i) does not allow a customs administration to verify that information during a verification of origin, the value of any material with respect to which that person did not allow the customs administration to verify the information may be determined by that customs administration in accordance with subsection (2) with respect to the transaction in which that person sells, or otherwise transfers to another person, that material or a material that incorporates that material.
Use of value of VNM as determined under section 12(3) for traced material incorporated into another material
(8) Where a heavy-duty component, sub-component or listed material is incorporated into a material produced in the territory of a NAFTA country and that material is incorporated into a heavy-duty automotive good, the statement referred to in subsection (1)(b)(ii), (d)(i) or (e)(i) may state the value of non-originating materials, determined in accordance with section 12(3), with respect to the material that incorporates the heavy-duty component, sub-component or listed material.
Interpretations and clarifications for provisions applicable to rules for determining VNM for heavy-duty automotive goods
(9) For purposes of this section,
(a) for purposes of calculating the regional value content of a heavy-duty automotive good, sub-component or listed material, a producer of such a good may, in accordance with section 7(4), designate as an intermediate material any self-produced material, other than a heavy-duty component or sub-component, that is used in the production of that good;
(b) except as otherwise provided in section 12(10), this section does not apply with respect to after-market parts;
(c) this section does not apply to a sub-component for purposes of calculating its regional value content before it is incorporated into a heavy-duty automotive good;
(d) for purposes of calculating the regional value content of a heavy-duty automotive good, the producer of that good may choose to treat any material used in the production of that good as a non-originating material, and the value of that material shall be determined in accordance with subsection (2) with respect to the transaction in which the producer acquired it;
(e) any information set out in a statement referred to in subsections (1)(b)(ii), (d)(i) through (iii) or (e)(i) that concerns the value of materials or costs shall be in the same currency as the currency of the country in which the person who provided the statement is located; and
(f) total cost under subsections (1)(a)(i) and (ii) consists of the costs referred to section 2(6), and is calculated in accordance with that section and section 2(7).
Examples of application of rules for determining VNM for heavy-duty automotive goods
(10) Each of the following examples is an “Example” as referred to in section 2(4).
Example 1: A listed material is imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries
A cast head, produced outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, is imported into the territory of a NAFTA country and used in that country in the production of an engine that will be used as original equipment in the production of a heavy-duty vehicle. No other non-originating materials are used in the production of the engine. The cast head is a listed material; the engine is an automotive component.
Situation 1: Use of the listed material in an automotive component
For purposes of calculating the regional value content of the engine, the value of listed materials imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries is included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the engine. Because the cast head was produced outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, its value, under section 10(1)(c), is included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the engine.
Situation 2: Use of an originating automotive component incorporating the listed material
The engine is an originating material acquired by the producer of the heavy-duty vehicle. For purposes of calculating the regional value content of the heavy-duty vehicle that incorporates that engine (and incorporates the cast head), the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle is determined under section 10(1)(d) with respect to that engine. The producer may choose to include in the value of non-originating materials of the heavy-duty vehicle
(a) the value, determined under section 10(1)(d)(i), of the non-originating materials that are incorporated into the engine, which is the value, determined under sections 10(1) (a) through (c) and paragraph (e)(ii), of the non-originating materials;
(b) the value, determined under section 10(1)(d)(ii), which is an amount equal to the amount determined under section 10(1)(d)(iv) multiplied by the remainder of one minus the regional value content, expressed as a decimal, of the engine;
(c) the value, determined under section 10(1)(d)(iii), which is an amount equal to the amount determined under section 10(1)(d)(iv) multiplied by the remainder of one minus the regional value-content requirement, expressed as a decimal, for the engine; or
(d) the value, determined under section 10(1)(d)(iv), of the engine.
The heavy-duty vehicle producer may only choose the first option if that producer has a statement, referred to in section 10(1)(d)(i), from the person from whom the engine was acquired. In this situation, the value, determined under section 10(1)(c), of the cast head, is included in the value of non-originating materials of the heavy-duty vehicle, with respect to the engine that is used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle.
The heavy-duty vehicle producer may only choose the second option if that producer has a statement, referred to in section 10(1)(d)(ii), from the person from whom the engine was acquired. In this situation, because of the application of the equation, the value of the cast head will be included in the amount determined under section 10(1)(d)(ii) and is, consequently, included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle.
The heavy-duty vehicle producer may only choose the third option if that producer has a statement, referred to in section 10(1)(d)(iii), from the person from whom the engine was acquired. In this situation, because of the application of the equation, the value of the cast head will be included in the amount determined under section 10(1)(d)(iii) and is, consequently, included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle.
Situation 3: Use of a non-originating automotive component incorporating the listed material
The engine is a non-originating material acquired by the producer of the heavy-duty vehicle. For purposes of calculating the regional value content of the heavy-duty vehicle that incorporates that engine (and incorporates the cast head), the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle is determined under section 10(1)(e) with respect to that engine. The producer of the heavy-duty vehicle may choose to include in the value of non-originating materials either
(a) the value, as determined under section 10(1)(e)(i), of the non-originating materials that are incorporated into the engine, which is the value of the non-originating materials as determined under sections 10(1)(a) through (d) and (f), or
(b) the value of the engine, determined under section 10(1)(e)(ii).
The heavy-duty vehicle producer may only choose the first option if that producer has a statement, referred to in section 10(1)(e)(i), from the person from whom the engine was acquired. In this situation, the value of the cast head, as determined under section 10(1)(c), is included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle, with respect to the engine that is used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle.
Example 2: A material is imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries
A rocker arm assembly, produced outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, is imported into the territory of a NAFTA country and used in that country in the production of an engine that will be used as original equipment in the production of a heavy-duty vehicle. No other non-originating materials are used in the production of the engine. The rocker arm assembly is neither a listed material nor a sub-component; the engine is an automotive component.
Situation 1: Use of the material in an automotive component
For purposes of calculating the regional value content of the engine, the value of non-originating materials that are not listed materials is included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the engine. Because the rocker arm assembly was produced outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, it is a non-originating material and its value, under section 10(1)(f), is included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the engine.
Situation 2: Use of an originating automotive component incorporating the material
The engine is an originating material acquired by the producer of the heavy-duty vehicle. For purposes of calculating the regional value content of the heavy-duty vehicle that incorporates that engine (and incorporates the rocker arm assembly), the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle is determined under section 10(1)(d) with respect to that engine. The producer may choose to include in the value of non-originating materials of the heavy-duty vehicle
(a) the value, determined under section 10(1)(d)(i), of the non-originating materials that are incorporated into the engine, which is the value, determined under sections 10(1) (a) through (c) and paragraph (e)(ii), of the non-originating materials;
(b) the value, determined under section 10(1)(d)(ii), which is an amount equal to the amount determined under section 10(1)(d)(iv) multiplied by the remainder of one minus the regional value content, expressed as a decimal, of the engine;
(c) the value, determined under section 10(1)(d)(iii), which is an amount equal to the amount determined under section 10(1)(d)(iv) multiplied by the remainder of one minus the regional value-content requirement, expressed as a decimal, for the engine; or
(d) the value, determined under section 10(1)(d)(iv), of the engine.
The heavy-duty vehicle producer may only choose the first option if that producer has a statement, referred to in section 10(1)(d)(i), from the person from whom the engine was acquired. In this situation, the value of the rocker arm assembly, as determined under section 10(1)(f), is not included in the value of non-originating materials of the heavy-duty vehicle, with respect to the engine that is used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle.
The heavy-duty vehicle producer may only choose the second option if that producer has a statement, referred to in section 10(1)(d)(ii), from the person from whom the engine was acquired. In this situation, because of the application of the equation, the value of the rocker arm assembly will be included in the amount determined under section 10(1)(d)(ii) and will, consequently, be included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle.
The heavy-duty vehicle producer may only choose the third option if that producer has a statement, referred to in section 10(1)(d)(iii), from the person from whom the engine was acquired. In this situation, because of the application of the equation, the value of the rocker arm assembly will be included in the amount determined under section 10(1)(d)(iii) and will, consequently, be included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle.
Situation 3: Use of a non-originating automotive component incorporating the material
The engine is a non-originating material acquired by the producer of the heavy-duty vehicle. For purposes of calculating the regional value content of the heavy-duty vehicle that incorporates that engine (and incorporates the rocker arm assembly), the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle is determined under section 10(1)(e) with respect to that engine. The producer of the heavy-duty vehicle may choose to include in the value of non-originating materials either
(a) the value, as determined under section 10(1)(e)(i), of the non-originating materials that are incorporated into the engine, which is the value of the non-originating materials as determined under sections 10(1) (a) through (d) and (f), or
(b) the value of the engine, determined under section 10(1)(e)(ii).
The heavy-duty vehicle producer may only choose the first option if that producer has a statement, referred to in section 10(1)(e)(i), from the person from whom the engine was acquired. In this situation, the value of the rocker arm assembly, as determined under section 10(1)(f), is included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle, with respect to the engine that is used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle.
Situation 4: Use of the material in a self-produced automotive component
If the engine is a self-produced material rather than an acquired material, the heavy-duty vehicle producer is using the rocker arm assembly in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle rather than in the production of the engine, because, under section 7(4), the engine cannot be designated as an intermediate material. For purposes of calculating the regional value content of the heavy-duty vehicle, the value, under section 10(1)(f), of the rocker arm assembly is included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle.
Example 3: An automotive component is imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries
A transmission, produced outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, is imported into the territory of a NAFTA country and used in that country as original equipment in the production of a heavy-duty vehicle. The transmission is an automotive component.
Situation: Use of the automotive component
For purposes of calculating the regional value content of the heavy-duty vehicle in which the transmission is used, the value of the transmission is included in the value of the non-originating materials under section 10(1)(c), regardless of whether the producer imported the transmission or acquired it from someone else in the territory of a NAFTA country.
Example 4: An automotive component is imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries
A transmission, produced outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, is imported into the territory of a NAFTA country and combined with an engine to produce an engine-transmission assembly that will be used as original equipment in the production of a heavy-duty vehicle. The transmission is an automotive component; the engine-transmission assembly is an automotive component assembly.
Situation: Use of the automotive component assembly
The automotive component assembly is acquired by a producer who uses it in the production of a heavy-duty vehicle. If the automotive component assembly that incorporates the imported transmission is an originating material, the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the automotive component assembly is determined, at the choice of the producer, under any of section 10(1)(d) (i), (ii), (iii) and (iv). (See example 1 for more detailed explanations of these provisions.) If the automotive component assembly that incorporates the imported transmission is a non-originating material, the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the automotive component assembly is determined, at the choice of the producer, under section 10(1)(e) (i) or (ii). (See example 1 for more detailed explanations of these provisions.)
Regardless of whether the automotive component assembly is an originating material or a non-originating material, the value of the automotive component that was imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries is included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle. The transmission is a non-originating material, and, for purposes of calculating the regional value content of an automotive component assembly or heavy-duty vehicle that incorporates that transmission, the value of the transmission is included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the automotive component assembly or heavy-duty vehicle that incorporates it.
Example 5: A material is imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries
An aluminum ingot, produced outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, is imported into the territory of a NAFTA country and used in that country in the production of cast block that will be used in an engine that will be used as original equipment in the production of a heavy-duty vehicle. The aluminum ingot is not a listed material; the cast block is a listed material; the engine is an automotive component.
Situation 1: Use of the material in an intermediate material that is a listed material
The engine producer designates the cast block as an intermediate material under section 7(4). For purposes of determining the origin of that cast block, because the aluminum ingot is classified under a different heading than the cast block, the cast block satisfies the applicable change in tariff classification and is an originating material.
Situation 2: Use of the listed material incorporating the material
For purposes of calculating the regional value content of the engine that incorporates that cast block (and thus incorporates the aluminum ingot), the value of non-originating materials is determined under section 10(1). Because none of sections 10(1) (a) through (f) require that a listed material that is an originating material be included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of a good, the value of the cast block is not included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the engine or in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of an automotive component assembly or heavy-duty vehicle that incorporates the engine.
Because section 10(1)(d) does not refer to a listed material that is an originating material, the value of the non-originating aluminum ingot used in the production of the originating cast block is not included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of any good or material that incorporates the originating cast block.
Example 6: A non-originating listed material is used to produce a sub-component that is used to produce another sub-component
A crankshaft, produced in the territory of NAFTA country A from a forging imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, is a non-originating material. The crankshaft is sold to another producer, located in the same country, who uses it to produce an originating block assembly. That block assembly is sold to another producer, also located in the same country, who uses it to produce a finished block. The finished block is sold to a producer of engines, who is located in NAFTA country B, for use in the production of a heavy-duty vehicle. The crankshaft is a listed material; the block assembly is a sub-component, as is the finished block.
Situation 1: Calculating the regional value content of the finished block
A sub-component is not a heavy-duty automotive good. As referred to in section 10(9)(c), for purposes of calculating the regional value content of the sub-component before it is incorporated into a heavy-duty automotive good, such as when the sub-component is exported from the territory of one NAFTA country to the territory of another NAFTA country, the value of non-originating materials of the sub-component includes only the value of non-originating materials used in the production of that sub-component. Because the block assembly is an originating material, its value is not included in the value of non-originating materials of the finished block, nor is the value of the non-originating crankshaft included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the finished block because the crankshaft was used in the production of the block assembly and was not used in the production of the finished block.
Situation 2: Calculating the regional value content of the component that incorporates the finished block
For purposes of calculating the regional value content of the heavy-duty vehicle that incorporates a sub-component, the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the sub-component is determined under section 10(1) (d) or (e) with respect to that sub-component. In this situation, the value, under section 10(1)(b), of the non-originating crankshaft is included in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the engine. (See examples 1 and 2 for more detailed explanations of sections 10(1) (d) and (e).)
Example 7: A non-listed material is imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries and is used in the production of another non-listed material
A bumper part, produced outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, is imported into the territory of a NAFTA country and is used in the production of a bumper. The bumper is used in the territory of a NAFTA country as original equipment in the production of a heavy-duty vehicle. Neither a bumper part nor a bumper is a listed material, sub-component, automotive component or automotive component assembly.
Situation 1: The non-listed material is an originating material
The bumper is an originating material. For purposes of calculating the regional value content of the heavy-duty vehicle, neither the value of the imported bumper part nor the value of the bumper is included in the value of the non-originating materials.
Situation 2: The non-listed material is a non-originating material
The bumper is a non-originating material. For purposes of calculating the regional value content of the heavy-duty vehicle, the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle is determined under section 10(1)(f) with respect to the bumper. In this situation, the value of the bumper is included in the value of non-originating materials of the heavy-duty vehicle. Because a bumper is not a listed material, the producer of the heavy-duty vehicle does not have the option, under section 10(1)(b)(ii), to include only the value of the imported bumper part in the value of non-originating materials used in the production of the heavy-duty vehicle.
Example 8:
Situation: Transhipment of a listed material
A producer, located in the territory of a NAFTA country, produces, in that country, a cast head that is an originating good. The producer exports the cast head to outside the territories of the NAFTA territories, where valves, springs, valve lifters, a camshaft and gears are added to it to create a cast head assembly. An engine producer, located in the territory of a NAFTA country, imports the cast head assembly into that country and uses it in the production of an engine that will be used as original equipment in the production of a heavy-duty vehicle. A cast head is a listed material; a cast head assembly is a sub-component.
For purposes of calculating the regional value content of the engine, the value of the imported cast head assembly is included in the value of non-originating materials under section 10(1)(c). The value of the cast head cannot be deducted from the value determined under section 10(1)(c). Although the cast head was once an originating good, under section 18 when further production was performed with respect to the cast head outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, it was no longer an originating good.
Example 9: A material is imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries and a heavy-duty vehicle producer self-produces a non-originating listed material
A material, produced outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, is imported into the territory of a NAFTA country and used in that country in the production of a water pump that will be used as original equipment by the same producer in the production of a heavy-duty vehicle. Although the producer, under section 7(4), designates the water pump as an intermediate material it is a non-originating material because it fails to satisfy the regional value-content requirement. A water pump is a listed material.
For purposes of calculating the regional value content of the heavy-duty vehicle, the value of non-originating materials includes, at the choice of the producer, either the total cost, determined under section 10(1)(a)(i), of the water pump or the value, determined under section 10(1)(a)(iii)(A), of the material imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries.
Example 10: A material is acquired and used to produce a non-originating listed material
A material, produced outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, is acquired in the territory of a NAFTA country and is used in that country in the production of a water pump that will be used as original equipment in the production of a heavy-duty vehicle. The producer of the water pump and the producer of the heavy-duty vehicle are separate, unrelated producers, located in the same country. A water pump is a listed material. The producer of the water pump chose to calculate the regional value content of the water pump in accordance with section 12(1) over a period set out in section 12(5)(a) and using a category set out in section 12(4)(b). The water pump is a non-originating material because it fails to satisfy the regional value-content requirement.
For purposes of calculating the regional value content of the heavy-duty vehicle, the value of non-originating materials includes, at the choice of the producer, either the value, determined under section 10(1)(b)(i), of the water pump or, if the producer has a statement referred to in section 10(1)(b)(ii)(B), the value, determined under that section, of the material imported from outside the territories of the NAFTA countries.
The producer has a statement referred to in section 10(1)(b)(ii)(B) and chooses to use the value of non-originating material determined under that section. The statement states, as is permitted under section 10(8), the value of non-originating material used in the production of the water pump in accordance with section 12(3) over a period set out in section 12(5)(a) and using a category set out in section 12(4)(e).
SECTION 11. MOTOR VEHICLE AVERAGING
NC and VNM for motor vehicles may be averaged over producer's fiscal year
(1) For purposes of calculating the regional value content of light-duty vehicles or heavy-duty vehicles, the producer of those motor vehicles may choose that
(a) the sum of the net costs incurred and the sum of the values of non-originating materials used by the producer be calculated over the producer's fiscal year with respect to the motor vehicles that are in any one of the categories set out in subsection (5) that is chosen by the producer; and
(b) the sums referred to in paragraph (a) be used in the calculation referred to in section 6(3) as the net cost and the value of non-originating materials, respectively.
Information required when producer chooses to average for motor vehicles
(2) A choice made under subsection (1) shall
(a) state the category chosen by the producer, and
(i) where the category referred to in subsection (5)(a) is chosen, state the model line, model name, class of motor vehicle and tariff classification of the motor vehicles in that category, and the location of the plant at which the motor vehicles are produced,
(ii) where the category referred to in subsection (5)(b) is chosen, state the model name, class of motor vehicle and tariff classification of the motor vehicles in that category, and the location of the plant at which the motor vehicles are produced, and
(iii) where the category referred to in subsection (5)(c) is chosen, state the model line, model name, class of motor vehicle and tariff classification of the motor vehicles in that category, and the locations of the plants at which the motor vehicles are produced;
(b) state the basis of the calculation described in subsection (9);
(c) state the producer's name and address;
(d) state the period with respect to which the choice is made, including the starting and ending dates;
(e) state the estimated regional value content of motor vehicles in the category on the basis stated under paragraph (b);
(f) be dated and signed by an authorized officer of the producer; and
(g) be filed with the customs administration of each NAFTA country to which vehicles in that category are to be exported during the period covered by the choice, at least 10 days before the first day of the producer's fiscal year, or such shorter period as that customs administration may accept.
Averaging period
(3) Where the fiscal year of a producer begins after the date of the entry into force of the Agreement but before one year after that date, the producer may choose that the calculation of regional value content referred to in subsection (1) or (6) be made under that subsection over the period beginning on the date of the entry into force of the Agreement and ending at the end of that fiscal year, in which case the choice shall be filed with the customs administration of each NAFTA country to which vehicles are to be exported during the period covered by the choice not later than 10 days after the entry into force of the Agreement, or such longer period as that customs administration may accept.
(4) Where the fiscal year of a producer begins on the date of the entry into force of the Agreement, the producer may make the choice referred to in subsection (1) not later than 10 days after the entry into force of the Agreement, or such longer period as the customs administration referred to in subsection (2)(g) may accept.
Categories of motor vehicles for averaging
(5) The categories referred to in subsection (1) are the following:
(a) the same model line of motor vehicles in the same class of motor vehicles produced in the same plant in the territory of a NAFTA country;
(b) the same class of motor vehicles produced in the same plant in the territory of a NAFTA country; and
(c) the same model line of motor vehicles produced in the territory of a NAFTA country.
(6) Where applicable, a producer may choose that the calculation of the regional value content of motor vehicles referred to in Schedule VI be made in accordance with that schedule.
Timely filing of choice to average
(7) Subject to section 5(4) of Schedule VI, the choice referred to in subsection (6) shall be filed with the customs administration of the NAFTA country to which vehicles referred to in that schedule are to be exported, at least 10 days before the first day of the producer's fiscal year with respect to which that choice is to apply or such shorter period as the customs administration may accept.
Choice to average cannot be rescinded
(8) A choice filed for the period referred to in subsection (1) or (3) may not be
(a) rescinded; or
(b) modified with respect to the category or basis of calculation.
Averaged net cost and VNM included in calculation of RVC on the basis of producer's option to include all vehicles of category or only certain exported vehicles of category
(9) For purposes of this section, where a producer files a choice under subsection (1), (3) or (4), including a choice referred to in section 13(9), the net cost incurred and the values of non-originating materials used by the producer, with respect to
(a) all motor vehicles that fall within the category chosen by the producer and that are produced during the fiscal year or, in the case of a choice filed under subsection (3), during the period with respect to which the choice is made, or
(b) those motor vehicles to be exported to the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries that fall within the category chosen by the producer and that are produced during the fiscal year or, in the case of a choice filed under subsection (3), during the period with respect to which the choice is made,
shall be included in the calculation of the regional value content under any of the categories set out in subsection (5).
Year-end analysis required if averaging based on estimated costs; obligation to notify of change in status
(10) Where the producer of a motor vehicle has calculated the regional value content of the motor vehicle on the basis of estimated costs, including standard costs, budgeted forecasts or other similar estimating procedures, before or during the producer's fiscal year, the producer shall conduct an analysis at the end of the producer's fiscal year of the actual costs incurred over the period with respect to the production of the motor vehicle, and, if the motor vehicle does not satisfy the regional value content requirement on the basis of the actual costs, immediately inform any person to whom the producer has provided a Certificate of Origin for the motor vehicle, or a written statement that the motor vehicle is an originating good, that the motor vehicle is a non-originating good.
(11) The following example is an “Example” as referred to in section 2(4).
Example:
A motor vehicle producer located in NAFTA country A produces vehicles that fall within a category set out in section 11(5) that is chosen by the producer. The motor vehicles are to be sold in NAFTA countries A, B and C, as well as in country D, which is not a NAFTA country. Under section 11(1), the motor vehicle producer may choose that the sum of the net costs incurred and the sum of the values of non-originating materials used by the producer be calculated over the producer's fiscal year. The producer may state in the choice the basis of the calculation as described in section 11(9)(a), in which case the calculation would be on the basis of all the motor vehicles produced regardless of where they are destined. Alternatively, the producer may state in the choice the basis of the calculation as described in section 11(9)(b). In this case, the producer would also need to state that the calculation is on the basis of
(a) the motor vehicles produced that are for export to NAFTA countries B and C;
(b) the motor vehicles produced that are for export to only NAFTA country B; or
(c) the motor vehicles produced that are for export to only NAFTA country C.
The calculation would be on the basis as described in the choice.
SECTION 12. AUTOMOTIVE PARTS AVERAGING
NC and VNM for automotive parts may be averaged to determine RVC of parts
(1) The regional value content of any or all goods that are of the same tariff provision listed in Schedule IV, or an automotive component assembly, an automotive component, a sub-component or a listed material, produced in the same plant, may, where the producer of those goods chooses to do so, be calculated by
(a) calculating the sum of the net costs incurred and the sum of the values of non-originating materials used by the producer of the goods over the period set out in subsection (5) that is chosen by the producer with respect to any or all of those goods in any one of the categories set out in subsection (4) that is chosen by the producer; and
(b) using the sums referred to in paragraph (a) in the calculation referred to in section 6(3) as the net cost and the value of non-originating materials, respectively.
(2) The calculation of the regional value content made under subsection (1) shall apply with respect to each unit of the goods in the category set out in subsection (4) that is chosen by the producer and produced during the period chosen by the producer under subsection (5).
VNM for each unit in a category of goods for which averaging used
(3) The value of non-originating materials of each unit of the goods
(a) in the category set out in subsection (4) chosen by the producer, and
(b) produced during the period chosen by the producer under subsection (5),
shall be the sum of the values of non-originating materials referred to in subsection (1)(a) divided by the number of units of the goods in that category and produced during that period.
Categories of automotive parts for averaging
(4) The categories referred to in subsection (1)(a) are the following:
(a) original equipment for use in the production of light- duty vehicles;
(b) original equipment for use in the production of heavy-duty vehicles;
(c) after-market parts;
(d) any combination of goods referred to in paragraphs (a) through (c);
(e) goods that are in a category set out in any of paragraphs (a) through (d) and are sold to one or more motor vehicle producers; and
(f) goods that are in a category set out in any of paragraphs (a) through (e) and are exported to the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries.
Periods for averaging RVC for automotive parts
(5) The period referred to in subsection (1)(a) is,
(a) with respect to goods referred to in subsection (4)(a), (b) or (d), or subsection 4(e) or (f) where the goods in that category are in a category referred to in subsection 4(a) or (b), any month, any consecutive three month period that is evenly divisible into the number of months of the producer's fiscal year, or of the fiscal year of the motor vehicle producer to whom those goods are sold, remaining at the beginning of that period, or the fiscal year of that motor vehicle producer to whom those goods are sold; and
(b) with respect to goods referred to in subsection (4)(c), or subsection (4)(e) or (f) where the goods in that category are in a category referred to in subsection (4)(c), any month, any consecutive three month period that is evenly divisible into the number of months of the producer's fiscal year, or of the fiscal year of the motor vehicle producer to whom those goods are sold, remaining at the beginning of that period, or the fiscal year of that producer or of that motor vehicle producer to whom those goods are sold.
Choice to average may not be rescinded
(6) A choice made under subsection (1) may not be rescinded or modified with respect to the goods or the period with respect to which the choice is made.
(7) Where a producer of goods chooses a one or three month period under subsection (5) with respect to the goods referred to in subsection (5)(a), that producer shall be considered to have chosen under that subsection a period or periods of the same duration for
(a) the remainder of the fiscal year of the motor vehicle producer to whom those goods are sold, where the producer chooses under subsection (9)(a) the fiscal year of that motor vehicle producer; and
(b) the remainder of the fiscal year of the producer of those goods, where the producer does not choose under subsection (9)(a) the fiscal year of the motor vehicle producer to whom the goods are sold.
(8) Where a producer of goods chooses a one or three month period under subsection (5) with respect to the goods referred to in subsection (5)(b), that producer shall be considered to have chosen under that subsection a period or periods of the same duration for the remainder of, at the choice of the producer, the producer's fiscal year or the fiscal year of the motor vehicle producer to whom those goods are sold.
(9) Where a producer of goods chooses a one or three month period under subsection (5) with respect to the goods, the producer may,
(a) with respect to goods referred to in subsection (5)(a), at the end of the fiscal year of the motor vehicle producer to whom those goods are sold, choose the fiscal year of that motor vehicle producer; and
(b) with respect to goods referred to in subsection (5)(b), at the end of the producer's fiscal year or the fiscal year of the motor vehicle producer to whom those goods are sold, as the case may be, choose the producer's fiscal year or the fiscal year of that motor vehicle producer.
Applicable method for averaging VNM under different categories
(10) Where a producer chooses that the regional value content of goods be calculated in accordance with subsection (1) and the goods are in any of the categories set out in subsections (4) (d) through (f), the value of non-originating materials
(a) shall be determined in the manner set out in section 9, where any of those goods are light-duty automotive goods;
(b) shall be determined in the manner set out in section 10, where any of those goods are heavy-duty automotive goods but none of the goods are light-duty automotive goods; and
(c) shall be determined in the manner set out in section 7, where none of those goods are light-duty automotive goods or heavy-duty automotive goods.
Year-end analysis required if averaging based on estimated costs; obligation to notify of change in status
(11) Where the producer of a good has calculated the regional value content of the good on the basis of estimated costs, including standard costs, budgeted forecasts or other similar estimating procedures, before or during the period chosen under subsection (1), the producer shall conduct an analysis, at the end of the producer's fiscal year following the end of that period, of the actual costs incurred over the period with respect to the production of the good and, if the good does not satisfy the regional value content requirement on the basis of the actual costs during that period, immediately inform any person to whom the producer has provided a Certificate of Origin for the good, or a written statement that the good is an originating good, that the good is a non-originating good.
SECTION 13. SPECIAL REGIONAL VALUE-CONTENT REQUIREMENTS
Changes in regional value content level for automotive goods
(1) Notwithstanding the regional value-content requirement set out in Schedule I, and except as otherwise provided in subsection (2), the regional value-content requirement for a good referred to in paragraph (a) or (b) is as follows:
(a) for the fiscal year of a producer that begins on the day closest to January 1, 1998 and for the three following fiscal years of that producer, not less than 56 percent, and for the fiscal year of a producer that begins on the day closest to January 1, 2002 and thereafter, not less than 62.5 percent, in the case of
(i) a light-duty vehicle, and
(ii) a good provided for in any of headings 8407 and 8408 and subheading 8708.40, that is for use in a light-duty vehicle; and
(b) for the fiscal year of a producer that begins on the day closest to January 1, 1998 and for the three following fiscal years of that producer, not less than 55 percent, and for the fiscal year of a producer that begins on the day closest to January 1, 2002 and thereafter, not less than 60 percent, in the case of
(i) a heavy-duty vehicle,
(ii) a good provided for in any of headings 8407 and 8408 and subheading 8708.40 that is for use in a heavy-duty vehicle, and
(iii) except in the case of a good referred to in paragraph (a)(ii) or provided for in any of subheadings 8482.10 through 8482.80, 8483.20 and 8483.30, a good of a tariff provision listed in Schedule IV that is subject to a regional value-content requirement and is for use in a light-duty vehicle or a heavy-duty vehicle.
Regional value content level for motor vehicles produced in a new plant or in a refit plant
(2) Notwithstanding the regional value-content requirement set out in Schedule I, the regional value-content requirement for a light-duty vehicle or a heavy-duty vehicle that is produced in a plant is as follows:
(a) not less than 50 percent for five years after the date on which the first prototype of the motor vehicle is produced in the plant by a motor vehicle assembler, if
(i) the motor vehicle is of a class, marque or, except in the case of a heavy-duty vehicle, size category and type of underbody, that was not previously produced by the motor vehicle assembler in the territory of any of the NAFTA countries,
(ii) the plant consists of, or includes, a new building in which the motor vehicle is assembled, and
(iii) the value of machinery that was never previously used for production, and that is used in the new building or buildings for the purposes of the complete motor vehicle assembly process with respect to that motor vehicle, is at least 90 percent of the value of all machinery used for purposes of that process; and
(b) not less than 50 percent for two years after the date on which the first prototype of the motor vehicle is produced in the plant by a motor vehicle assembler following a refit of that plant, if the motor vehicle is of a class, marque or, except in the case of a heavy-duty vehicle, size category and type of underbody, that was not assembled by the motor vehicle assembler in the plant before the refit.
Value of machinery in a new plant
(3) For purposes of subsection (2)(a)(iii), the value of machinery shall be
(a) where the machinery was acquired by the producer of the motor vehicle from another person, the cost of that machinery that is recorded on the books of the producer;
(b) where the machinery was used previously by the producer of the motor vehicle in the production of another good, the cost of the machinery that is recorded on the books of the producer minus accumulated depreciation of that machinery that is recorded on those books; and
(c) where the machinery was produced by the producer of the good, the total cost incurred with respect to that machinery, calculated on the basis of the costs that are recorded on the books of the producer.
Averaging period for calculation of RVC for vehicles of new plant or refit plant
(4) For purposes of calculating the regional value content of a motor vehicle referred to in subsection (2) that is in any one of the categories set out in subsection (7) that is chosen by the producer, the producer may file with the customs administration of the NAFTA country into the territory of which vehicles in that category are to be imported a choice to calculate the regional value content of such vehicles by
(a) calculating the sum of the net costs incurred and the sum of the values of non-originating materials used by the producer with respect to all of such motor vehicles in the category chosen over
(i) the period beginning on the day on which the first prototype of the motor vehicle is produced and ending on the last day of the producer's first fiscal year that begins on or after the beginning of the period,
(ii) a fiscal year of the producer that starts after the period referred to in subparagraph (i) and ends on or before the end of the period referred to in subsection (2)(a) or (b), or
(iii) the period beginning on the first day of the producer's fiscal year that begins before the end of the period referred to in subsection (2)(a) or (b) and ending at the end of that period; and
(b) using the sums referred to in paragraph (a) in the calculation referred to in section 6(3) as the net cost and the value of non-originating materials, respectively.
Information required on document filed when choosing to average; timely filing;
(5) A choice made under subsection (4) shall
(a) state the category chosen by the producer and
(i) where the category referred to in subsection (7)(a) is chosen, the model name, model line, class of motor vehicle and tariff classification of the motor vehicles in that category, and the location of the plant at which the motor vehicles are produced, and
(ii) where the category referred to in subsection (7)(b) is chosen, state the model name, class of motor vehicle and tariff classification of the motor vehicles in that category, and the plant location at which the motor vehicles are produced;
(b) state the basis of the calculation described in subsection (8);
(c) state the producer's name and address;
(d) state the period with respect to which the choice is made, including the starting and ending dates;
(e) state the estimated regional value content of motor vehicles in the category on the basis stated under paragraph (b);
(f) state whether the choice is with respect to a motor vehicle referred to in subsection (2)(a) or (b);
(g) be dated and signed by an authorized officer of the producer; and
(h) be filed with the customs administration of each NAFTA country to which vehicles in that category are to be exported during the period covered by the choice, at least 10 days before the first day of the producer's fiscal year, or such shorter period as that customs administration may accept.
No rescission or modification permitted
(6) A choice filed for the period referred to in subsection (4) may not be
(a) rescinded; or
(b) modified with respect to the category or basis of calculation.
Categories of motor vehicles for averaging
(7) The categories referred to in subsection (4) are the following:
(a) the same model line of motor vehicles in the same class of motor vehicles produced in the same plant in the territory of a NAFTA country; and
(b) the same class of motor vehicles produced in the same plant in the territory of a NAFTA country.
(8) For purposes of subsection (4), the net cost incurred and the values of non-originating materials used by the producer, with respect to
(a) all motor vehicles that fall within the category chosen by the producer and that are produced during the period with respect to which the choice is made, or
(b) those motor vehicles to be exported to the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries that fall within the category chosen by the producer and that are produced during the period with respect to which the choice is made,
shall be included in the calculation of the regional value content under any of the categories set out in subsection (7).
Period for averaging RVC of motor vehicles of new or refit plant
(9) Where the period referred to in subsection (4) ends on a day other than the last day of the producer's fiscal year, the producer may, for purposes of section 11, make the choice referred to in that section with respect to
(a) the period beginning on the day following the end of that period and ending on the last day of that fiscal year; or
(b) the period beginning on the day following the end of that period and ending on the last day of the following full fiscal year.
Year-end analysis required if averaging based on estimated costs; obligation to notify of change in status
(10) Where the producer of a motor vehicle has calculated the regional value content of the motor vehicle on the basis of estimated costs, including standard costs, budgeted forecasts or other similar estimating procedures, before or during the producer's fiscal year, the producer shall conduct an analysis at the end of the producer's fiscal year of the actual costs incurred over the period with respect to the production of the motor vehicle, and, if the motor vehicle does not satisfy the regional value-content requirement on the basis of the actual costs, immediately inform any person to whom the producer has provided a Certificate of Origin for the motor vehicle, or a written statement that the motor vehicle is an originating good, that the motor vehicle is a non-originating good.
PART VI
GENERAL PROVISIONS
SECTION 14. ACCUMULATION
Option to determine origin of good by accumulating the production of a material with production of the good in which the material is used
(1) Subject to subsections (2) and (4), for purposes of determining whether a good is an originating good, an exporter or producer of a good may choose to accumulate the production, by one or more producers in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries, of materials that are incorporated into that good so that the production of the materials shall be considered to have been performed by that exporter or producer.
Statement required; information as to net cost and value of non-originating materials from production of material if accumulating for regional value content requirement
(2) Where a good is subject to a regional value-content requirement and an exporter or producer of the good has a statement signed by a producer of a material that is used in the production of the good that
(a) states the net cost incurred and the value of non-originating materials used by the producer of the material in the production of that material,
(i) the net cost incurred by the producer of the good with respect to the material shall be the net cost incurred by the producer of the material plus, where not included in the net cost incurred by the producer of the material, the costs referred to in sections 7(1)(c) through (e), and
(ii) the value of non-originating materials used by the producer of the good with respect to the material shall be the value of non-originating materials used by the producer of the material; or
(b) states any amount, other than an amount that includes any of the value of non-originating materials, that is part of the net cost incurred by the producer of the material in the production of that material,
(i) the net cost incurred by the producer of the good with respect to the material shall be the value of the material, determined in accordance with section 7(1), and
(ii) the value of non-originating materials used by the producer of the good with respect to the material shall be the value of the material, determined in accordance with section 7(1), minus the amount stated in the statement.
Averaging of costs from accumulated production
(3) Where a good is subject to a regional value-content requirement and an exporter or producer of the good does not have a statement described in subsection (2) but has a statement signed by a producer of a material that is used in the production of the good that
(a) states the sum of the net costs incurred and the sum of the values of non-originating materials used by the producer of the material in the production of that material and identical materials or similar materials, or any combination thereof, produced in a single plant by the producer of the material over a month or any consecutive three, six or twelve month period that falls within the fiscal year of the producer of the good, divided by the number of units of materials with respect to which the statement is made,
(i) the net cost incurred by the producer of the good with respect to the material shall be the sum of the net costs incurred by the producer of the material with respect to that material and the identical materials or similar materials, divided by the number of units of materials with respect to which the statement is made, plus, where not included in the net costs incurred by the producer of the material, the costs referred to in sections 7(1) (c) through (e), and
(ii) the value of non-originating materials used by the producer of the good with respect to the material shall be the sum of the values of non-originating materials used by the producer of the material with respect to that material and the identical materials or similar materials divided by the number of units of materials with respect to which the statement is made; or
(b) states any amount, other than an amount that includes any of the values of non-originating materials, that is part of the sum of the net costs incurred by the producer of the material in the production of that material and identical materials or similar materials, or any combination thereof, produced in a single plant by the producer of the material over a month or any consecutive three, six or twelve month period that falls within the fiscal year of the producer of the good, divided by the number of units of materials with respect to which the statement is made,
(i) the net cost incurred by the producer of the good with respect to the material shall be the value of the material, determined in accordance with section 7(1), and
(ii) the value of non-originating materials used by the producer of the good with respect to the material shall be the value of the material, determined in accordance with section 7(1), minus the amount stated in the statement.
Accumulated production considered to be production of a single producer
(4) For purposes of section 7(4), where a producer of the good chooses to accumulate the production of materials under subsection (1), that production shall be considered to be the production of the producer of the good.
(5) For purposes of this section,
(a) in order to accumulate the production of a material,
(i) where the good is subject to a regional value-content requirement, the producer of the good must have a statement described in subsection (2) or (3) that is signed by the producer of the material, and
(ii) where an applicable change in tariff classification is applied to determine whether the good is an originating good, the producer of the good must have a statement signed by the producer of the material that states the tariff classification of all non-originating materials used by that producer in the production of that material and that the production of the material took place entirely in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries;
(b) a producer of a good who chooses to accumulate is not required to accumulate the production of all materials that are incorporated into the good; and
(c) any information set out in a statement referred to in subsection (2) or (3) that concerns the value of materials or costs shall be in the same currency as the currency of the country in which the person who provided the statement is located.
Examples of accumulation of production
(6) Each of the following examples is an “Example” as referred to in section 2(4).
Example 1:section 14(1)
Producer A, located in NAFTA country A, imports unfinished bearing rings provided for in subheading 8482.99 into NAFTA country A from a non-NAFTA territory. Producer A further processes the unfinished bearing rings into finished bearing rings, which are of the same subheading. The finished bearing rings of Producer A do not satisfy an applicable change in tariff classification and therefore do not qualify as originating goods. The net cost of the finished bearing rings (per unit) is calculated as follows:
Product costs:
Value of originating materials $0.15
Value of non-originating materials 0.75
Other product costs 0.35
Period costs: (including $0.05 in excluded costs) 0.15
Other costs 0.05
Total cost of the finished bearing rings, per unit $1.45
Excluded costs: (included in period costs) 0.05
Net cost of the finished bearing rings, per unit $1.40
Producer A sells the finished bearing rings to Producer B who is located in NAFTA country A for $1.50 each. Producer B further processes them into bearings, and intends to export the bearings to NAFTA country B. Although the bearings satisfy the applicable change in tariff classification, the bearings are subject to a regional value-content requirement.
Situation A:
Producer B does not choose to accumulate costs incurred by Producer A with respect to the bearing rings used in the production of the bearings. The net cost of the bearings (per unit) is calculated as follows:
Product costs:
Value of originating materials $0.45
Value of non-originating materials (value, per unit, of the bearing rings purchased from Producer A) 1.50
Other product costs 0.75
Period costs: (including $0.05 in excluded costs) 0.15
Other costs 0.05
Total cost of the bearings, per unit $2.90
Excluded costs: (included in period costs) 0.05
Net cost of the bearings, per unit $2.85
Under the net cost method, the regional value content of the bearings is
Therefore, the bearings are non-originating goods.
Situation B:
Producer B chooses to accumulate costs incurred by Producer A with respect to the bearing rings used in the production of the bearings. Producer A provides a statement described in section 14(2)(a) to Producer B. The net cost of the bearings (per unit) is calculated as follows:
Product costs:
Value of originating materials ($0.45 $0.15) $0.60
Value of non-originating materials (value, per unit, of the unfinished bearing rings imported by Producer A) 0.75
Other product costs ($0.75 $0.35) 1.10
Period costs: (($0.15 $0.15), including $0.10 in excluded costs) 0.30
Other costs: ($0.05 $0.05) 0.10
Total cost of the bearings, per unit $2.85
Excluded costs: (included in period costs) 0.10
Net cost of the bearings, per unit $2.75
Under the net cost method, the regional value content of the bearings is
Therefore, the bearings are originating goods.
Situation C:
Producer B chooses to accumulate costs incurred by Producer A with respect to the bearing rings used in the production of the bearings. Producer A provides to Producer B a statement described in section 14(2)(b) that specifies an amount equal to the net cost minus the value of non-originating materials used to produce the finished bearing rings ($1.40−$0.75 = $0.65). The net cost of the bearings (per unit) is calculated as follows:
Product costs:
Value of originating materials ($0.45 $0.65) $1.10
Value of non-originating materials ($1.50−$0.65) 0.85
Other product costs 0.75
Period costs: (including $0.05 in excluded costs) 0.15
Other costs 0.05
Total cost of the bearings, per unit $2.90
Excluded costs: (included in period costs) 0.05
Net cost of the bearings, per unit $2.85
Under the net cost method, the regional value content of the bearings is
Therefore, the bearings are originating goods.
Situation D:
Producer B chooses to accumulate costs incurred by Producer A with respect to the bearing rings used in the production of the bearings. Producer A provides to Producer B a statement described in section 14(2)(b) that specifies an amount equal to the value of other product costs used in the production of the finished bearing rings ($0.35). The net cost of the bearings (per unit) is calculated as follows:
Product costs:
Value of originating materials $0.45
Value of non-originating materials ($1.50−$0.35) 1.15
Other product costs ($0.75 $0.35) 1.10
Period costs: (including $0.05 in excluded costs) 0.15
Other costs 0.05
Total cost of the bearings, per unit $2.90
Excluded costs: (included in period costs) 0.05
Net cost of the bearings, per unit $2.85
Under the net cost method, the regional value content of the bearings is
Therefore, the bearings are originating goods.
Example 2:section 14(1)
Producer A, located in NAFTA country A, imports non-originating cotton, carded or combed, provided for in heading 5203 for use in the production of cotton yarn provided for in heading 5205. Because the change from cotton, carded or combed, to cotton yarn is a change within the same chapter, the cotton does not satisfy the applicable change in tariff classification for heading 5205, which is a change from any other chapter, with certain exceptions. Therefore, the cotton yarn that Producer A produces from non-originating cotton is a non-originating good.
Producer A then sells the non-originating cotton yarn to Producer B, also located in NAFTA country A, who uses the cotton yarn in the production of woven fabric of cotton provided for in heading 5208. The change from non-originating cotton yarn to woven fabric of cotton is insufficient to satisfy the applicable change in tariff classification for heading 5208, which is a change from any heading outside headings 5208 through 5212, except from certain headings, under which various yarns, including cotton yarn provided for in heading 5205, are classified. Therefore, the woven fabric of cotton that Producer B produces from non-originating cotton yarn produced by Producer A is a non-originating good.
However, under section 14(1), if Producer B chooses to accumulate the production of Producer A, the production of Producer A would be considered to have been performed by Producer B. The rule for heading 5208, under which the cotton fabric is classified, does not exclude a change from heading 5203, under which carded or combed cotton is classified. Therefore, under section 15(1), the change from carded or combed cotton provided for in heading 5203 to the woven fabric of cotton provided for in heading 5208 would satisfy the applicable change of tariff classification for heading 5208. The woven fabric of cotton would be considered as an originating good.
Producer B, in order to choose to accumulate Producer A's production, must have a statement described in section 14(4)(a)(ii).
SECTION 15. INABILITY TO PROVIDE SUFFICIENT INFORMATION
Supplier of material unable to provide information; beyond control of supplier; procedure to be followed by Customs
(1) Where, during a verification of origin of a good, the person from whom a producer of the good acquired a material used in the production of that good is unable to provide the customs administration that is conducting the verification with sufficient information to substantiate that the material is an originating material or that the value of the material declared for purpose of calculating the regional value content of the good is accurate, and the inability of that person to provide the information is due to reasons beyond the control of that person, the customs administration shall, before making a determination as to the origin or value of the material, consider, where relevant, the following:
(a) whether the customs administration of the NAFTA country into the territory of which the good was imported issued an advance ruling under Article 509 of the Agreement, as implemented in each NAFTA country, with respect to that material that concluded that the material is an originating material or that the value of the material declared for purposes of calculating the regional value content of the good is accurate;
(b) whether an independent auditor has confirmed the accuracy of
(i) any signed statement referred to in this appendix with respect to the material,
(ii) the information that was used by the person from whom the producer acquired the material to substantiate whether the material is an originating material, or
(iii) the information submitted by the producer of the material with an application for an advance ruling where, on the basis of that information, the customs administration concluded that the material is an originating material or that the value declared for the purpose of calculating the regional value content of the good is accurate;
(c) whether the customs administration has, before the start of the origin verification of the good, conducted a verification of origin of identical materials or similar materials produced by the producer of the material and determined that
(i) the identical materials or similar materials are originating materials, or
(ii) any signed statement referred to in this appendix with respect to those identical materials or similar materials is accurate;
(d) whether the producer of the good has exercised due diligence to ensure that any signed statement that is referred to in this appendix with respect to the material and that was provided by the person from whom the producer acquired the material is accurate;
(e) where the customs administration has access only to partial records of the person from whom the producer acquired the material, whether the records provide sufficient evidence to substantiate that the material is an originating material or that the value of the material declared for purposes of calculating the regional value content of the good is accurate;
(f) whether the customs administration can obtain, subject to Article 507 of the Agreement, as implemented in each NAFTA country, by means other than those referred to in paragraphs (a) through (e), relevant information regarding the determination of the origin or value of the material from the customs administration of the NAFTA country in the territory of which the person from whom the producer acquired the material was located; and
(g) whether the producer of the good, the person from whom the producer acquired the material or a representative of that person or producer agrees to bear the expenses incurred in providing the customs administration with the assistance that it may require for determining the origin or value of the material.
“Reasons beyond control” of supplier
(2) For purposes of subsection (1), “reasons beyond the control” of the person from whom the producer of the good acquired the material includes
(a) the bankruptcy of the person from whom the producer acquired the material or any other financial distress situation or business reorganization that resulted in that person or a related person having lost control of the records containing the information that substantiate that the material is an originating material or the value of the material declared for the purpose of calculating the regional value content of the good;
(b) any other reason that results in partial or complete loss of records of that producer that the producer could not reasonably have been expected to foresee, including loss of records due to fire, flooding or other natural cause.
Exporter or producer of good unable to provide information; reasons beyond control of exporter or producer; procedure to be followed by Customs
(3) Where, during a verification of origin of a good, the exporter or producer of the good is unable to provide the customs administration conducting the verification with sufficient information to substantiate that the good is an originating good, and the inability of that person to provide the information is due to reasons beyond the control of that person, the customs administration shall, before making a determination as to the origin of the good, consider, where relevant, the following:
(a) whether the customs administration of the NAFTA country into the territory of which the good was imported issued an advance ruling under Article 509 of the Agreement, as implemented in each NAFTA country, with respect to that good that concluded that the good is an originating good;
(b) whether an independent auditor has confirmed the accuracy of an origin statement with respect to the good;
(c) whether the customs administration has, before the start of the origin verification of the good, conducted a verification of origin of identical goods or similar goods produced by the producer of the good and determined that the identical goods or similar goods are originating goods;
(d) whether the exporter or producer of the good has exercised due diligence to ensure that the information provided to substantiate that the good is an originating good is sufficient; and
(e) where the customs administration has access only to partial records of the exporter or producer of the good, whether the records provide sufficient evidence to substantiate that the good is an originating good;
(f) whether the customs administration can obtain, subject to Article 507 of the Agreement, as implemented in each NAFTA country, by means other than those referred to in paragraphs (a) through (e), relevant information regarding the determination of the origin of the good from the customs administration of the NAFTA country in the territory of which the exporter or producer of the good was located; and
(g) whether the exporter or producer of the good or a representative of that person agrees to bear the expenses incurred in providing the customs administration with the assistance that it may require for determining the origin or value of the good.
“Reasons beyond control”
(4) For purposes of subsection (3), “reasons beyond the control” of the exporter or producer of the good includes
(a) the bankruptcy of the exporter or producer or any other financial distress situation or business reorganization that resulted in that person or a related person having lost control of the records containing the information that substantiate that the good is an originating good;
(b) any other reason that results in partial or complete loss of records of that exporter or producer that that person could not reasonably have been expected to foresee, including loss of records due to fire, flooding or other natural cause.
SECTION 16. TRANSSHIPMENT
Effect of subsequent processing outside the territory of a NAFTA country; loss of originating good status
(1) A good is not an originating good by reason of having undergone production that occurs entirely in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries that would enable the good to qualify as an originating good if subsequent to that production
(a) the good is withdrawn from customs control outside the territories of the NAFTA countries; or
(b) the good undergoes further production or any other operation outside the territories of the NAFTA countries, other than unloading, reloading or any other operation necessary to preserve the good in good condition, such as inspection, removal of dust that accumulates during shipment, ventilation, spreading out or drying, chilling, replacing salt, sulphur dioxide or other aqueous solutions, replacing damaged packing materials and containers and removal of units of the good that are spoiled or damaged and present a danger to the remaining units of the good, or to transport the good to the territory of a NAFTA country.
Transshipped good considered entirely non-originating
(2) A good that is a non-originating good by application of subsection (1) is considered to be entirely non-originating for purposes of this appendix.
Exceptions for certain goods
(3) Subsection (1) does not apply with respect to a good provided for in any of subheadings 8541.10 through 8541.60 and 8542.10 through 8542.70 where any further production or other operation that that good undergoes outside the territories of the NAFTA countries does not result in a change in the tariff classification of the good to a subheading outside subheadings 8541.10 through 8542.90.
SECTION 17. NON-QUALIFYING OPERATIONS
Mere dilution; production or pricing practice to circumvent the provisions of this appendix
17. A good is not an originating good merely by reason of
(a) mere dilution with water or another substance that does not materially alter the characteristics of the good; or
(b) any production or pricing practice with respect to which it may be demonstrated, on the basis of a preponderance of evidence, that the object was to circumvent this appendix.
SCHEDULE I
Schedule I shall be the text of Annex 401 to the Agreement as implemented in General Note 12 of the HTSUS.
SCHEDULE II
VALUE OF GOODS
SECTION 1. Definitions.
For purposes of this Schedule, unless otherwise stated:
“buyer” refers to a person who purchases a good from the producer;
“buying commissions” means fees paid by a buyer to that buyer's agent for the agent's services in representing the buyer in the purchase of a good;
“producer” refers to the producer of the good being valued.
SECTION 2.
For purposes of Article 402(2) of the Agreement, as implemented by section 6(2) of this appendix, the transaction value of a good shall be the price actually paid or payable for the good, determined in accordance with section 3 and adjusted in accordance with section 4.
SECTION 3.
(1) The price actually paid or payable is the total payment made or to be made by the buyer to or for the benefit of the producer. The payment need not necessarily take the form of a transfer of money; it may be made by letters of credit or negotiable instruments. The payment may be made directly or indirectly to the producer. For an illustration of this, the settlement by the buyer, whether in whole or in part, of a debt owed by the producer is an indirect payment.
(2) Activities undertaken by the buyer on the buyer's own account, other than those for which an adjustment is provided in section 4, shall not be considered to be an indirect payment, even though the activities might be regarded as being for the benefit of the producer. For an illustration of this, the buyer, by agreement with the producer, undertakes activities relating to the marketing of the good. The costs of such activities shall not be added to the price actually paid or payable.
(3) The transaction value shall not include the following charges or costs, provided that they are distinguished from the price actually paid or payable:
(a) charges for construction, erection, assembly, maintenance or technical assistance related to the good undertaken after the good has been sold to the buyer; or
(b) duties and taxes paid in the country in which the buyer is located with respect to the good.
(4) The flow of dividends or other payments from the buyer to the producer that do not relate to the purchase of the good are not part of the transaction value.
SECTION 4.
(1) In determining the transaction value of a good, the following shall be added to the price actually paid or payable:
(a) to the extent that they are incurred by the buyer, or by a related person on behalf of the buyer, with respect to the good being valued and are not included in the price actually paid or payable
(i) commissions and brokerage fees, except buying commissions,
(ii) the costs of transporting the good to the producer's point of direct shipment and the costs of loading, unloading, handling and insurance that are associated with that transportation, and
(iii) where the packaging materials and containers in which the good is packaged for retail sale are classified with the good under the Harmonized System, the value of the packaging materials and containers;
(b) the value, reasonably allocated in accordance with subsection (12), of the following elements where they are supplied directly or indirectly to the producer by the buyer, free of charge or at reduced cost for use in connection with the production and sale of the good, to the extent that the value is not included in the price actually paid or payable:
(i) a material, other than an indirect material, used in the production of the good,
(ii) tools, dies, molds and similar indirect materials used in the production of the good,
(iii) an indirect material, other than those referred to in subparagraph (ii) or in paragraphs (c), (e) or (f) of the definition “indirect material” set out in Article 415 of the Agreement, as implemented by section 2(1) of this appendix, used in the production of the good, and
(iv) engineering, development, artwork, design work, and plans and sketches necessary for the production of the good, regardless of where performed;
(c) the royalties related to the good, other than charges with respect to the right to reproduce the good in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries, that the buyer must pay directly or indirectly as a condition of sale of the good, to the extent that such royalties are not included in the price actually paid or payable; and
(d) the value of any part of the proceeds of any subsequent resale, disposal or use of the good that accrues directly or indirectly to the producer.
(2) The additions referred to in subsection (1) shall be made to the price actually paid or payable under this section only on the basis of objective and quantifiable data.
(3) Where objective and quantifiable data do not exist with regard to the additions required to be made to the price actually paid or payable under subsection (1), the transaction value cannot be determined under section 2.
(4) No additions shall be made to the price actually paid or payable for the purpose of determining the transaction value except as provided in this section.
(5) The amounts to be added under subsections (1)(a) (i) and (ii) shall be
(a) those amounts that are recorded on the books of the buyer, or
(b) where those amounts are costs incurred by a related person on behalf of the buyer and are not recorded on the books of the buyer, those amounts that are recorded on the books of that related person.
(6) The value of the packaging materials and containers referred to in subsection (1)(a)(iii) and the value of the elements referred to in subsection (1)(b)(i) shall be
(a) where the packaging materials and containers or the elements are imported from outside the territory of the NAFTA country in which the producer is located, the customs value of the packaging materials and containers or the elements,
(b) where the buyer, or a related person on behalf of the buyer, purchases the packaging materials and containers or the elements from an unrelated person in the territory of the NAFTA country in which the producer is located, the price actually paid or payable for the packaging materials and containers or the elements,
(c) where the buyer, or a related person on behalf of the buyer, acquires the packaging materials and containers or the elements from an unrelated person in the territory of the NAFTA country in which the producer is located other than through a purchase, the value of the consideration related to the acquisition of the packaging materials and containers or the elements, based on the cost of the consideration that is recorded on the books of the buyer or the related person, or
(d) where the packaging materials and containers or the elements are produced by the buyer, or by a related person, in the territory of the NAFTA country in which the producer is located, the total cost of the packaging materials and containers or the elements, determined in accordance with subsection (7),
and shall include the following costs that are recorded on the books of the buyer or the related person supplying the packaging materials and containers or the elements on behalf of the buyer, to the extent that such costs are not included under paragraphs (a) through (d):
(e) the costs of freight, insurance, packing, and all other costs incurred in transporting the packaging materials and containers or the elements to the location of the producer,
(f) duties and taxes paid or payable with respect to the packaging materials and containers or the elements, other than duties and taxes that are waived, refunded, refundable or otherwise recoverable, including credit against duty or tax paid or payable,
(g) customs brokerage fees, including the cost of in-house customs brokerage services, incurred with respect to the packaging materials and containers or the elements, and
(h) the cost of waste and spoilage resulting from the use of the packaging materials and containers or the elements in the production of the good, less the value of renewable scrap or by-product.
(7) For purposes of subsection (6)(d), the total cost of the packaging materials and containers referred to in subsection (1)(a)(iii) or the elements referred to in subsection (1)(b)(i) shall be
(a) where the packaging materials and containers or the elements are produced by the buyer, at the choice of the buyer,
(i) the total cost incurred with respect to all goods produced by the buyer, calculated on the basis of the costs that are recorded on the books of the buyer, that can be reasonably allocated to the packaging materials and containers or the elements in accordance with Schedule VII, or
(ii) the aggregate of each cost incurred by the buyer that forms part of the total cost incurred with respect to the packaging materials and containers or the elements, calculated on the basis of the costs that are recorded on the books of the buyer, that can be reasonably allocated to the packaging materials and containers or the elements in accordance with Schedule VII; and
(b) where the packaging materials and containers or the elements are produced by a person who is related to the buyer, at the choice of the buyer,
(i) the total cost incurred with respect to all goods produced by that related person, calculated on the basis of the costs that are recorded on the books of that person, that can be reasonably allocated to the packaging materials and containers or the elements in accordance with Schedule VII, or
(ii) the aggregate of each cost incurred by that related person that forms part of the total cost incurred with respect to the packaging materials and containers or the elements, calculated on the basis of the costs that are recorded on the books of that person, that can be reasonably allocated to the packaging materials and containers or the elements in accordance with Schedule VII.
(8) Except as provided in subsections (10) and (11), the value of the elements referred to in subsections (1)(b)(ii) through (iv) shall be
(a) the cost of those elements that is recorded on the books of the buyer, or
(b) where such elements are provided by another person on behalf of the buyer and the cost is not recorded on the books of the buyer, the cost of those elements that is recorded on the books of that other person.
(9) Where the elements referred to in subsections (1)(b)(ii) through (iv) were previously used by or on behalf of the buyer, the value of the elements shall be adjusted downward to reflect that use.
(10) Where the elements referred to in subsections (1)(b)(ii) and (iii) were leased by the buyer or a person related to the buyer, the value of the elements shall be the cost of the lease as recorded on the books of the buyer or that related person.
(11) No addition shall be made to the price actually paid or payable for the elements referred to in subsection (1)(b)(iv) that are available in the public domain, other than the cost of obtaining copies of them.
(12) The producer shall choose the method of allocating to the good the value of the elements referred to in subsections (1)(b)(ii) through (iv), provided that the value is reasonably allocated to the good in a manner appropriate to the circumstances. The methods the producer may choose to allocate the value include allocating the value over the number of units produced up to the time of the first shipment or allocating the value over the entire anticipated production where contracts or firm commitments exist for that production. For an illustration of this, a buyer provides the producer with a mold to be used in the production of the good and contracts with the producer to buy 10,000 units of that good. By the time the first shipment of 1,000 units arrives, the producer has already produced 4,000 units. In these circumstances, the producer may choose to allocate the value of the mold over 4,000 units or 10,000 units but shall not choose to allocate the value of the elements to the first shipment of 1,000 units. The producer may choose to allocate the entire value of the elements to a single shipment of a good only where that single shipment comprises all of the units of the good acquired by the buyer under the contract or commitment for that number of units of the good between the producer and the buyer.
(13) The addition for the royalties referred to in subsection (1)(c) shall be the payment for the royalties that is recorded on the books of the buyer, or where the payment for the royalties is recorded on the books of another person, the payment for the royalties that is recorded on the books of that other person.
(14) The value of the proceeds referred to in subsection (1)(d) shall be the amount that is recorded for such proceeds on the books of the buyer or the producer.
SCHEDULE III
UNACCEPTABLE TRANSACTION VALUE
SECTION 1. Definitions.
For purposes of this Schedule, unless otherwise stated
“buyer” refers to a person who purchases a good from the producer;
“customs administration” refers to the customs administration of the NAFTA country into whose territory the good being valued is imported;
“producer” refers to the producer of the good being valued.
SECTION 2.
(1) There is no transaction value for a good where the good is not the subject of a sale.
(2) The transaction value of a good is unacceptable where
(a) there are restrictions on the disposition or use of the good by the buyer, other than restrictions that
(i) are imposed or required by law or by the public authorities in the territory of the NAFTA country in which the buyer is located,
(ii) limit the geographical area in which the good may be resold, or
(iii) do not substantially affect the value of the good;
(b) the sale or price actually paid or payable is subject to a condition or consideration for which a value cannot be determined with respect to the good;
(c) part of the proceeds of any subsequent resale, disposal or use of the good by the buyer will accrue directly or indirectly to the producer, and an appropriate addition to the price actually paid or payable cannot be made in accordance with section 4(1)(d) of Schedule II; or
(d) except as provided in section 3, the producer and the buyer are related persons and the relationship between them influenced the price actually paid or payable for the good.
(3) The conditions or considerations referred to in subsection (2)(b) include the following circumstances:
(a) the producer establishes the price actually paid or payable for the good on condition that the buyer will also buy other goods in specified quantities;
(b) the price actually paid or payable for the good is dependent on the price or prices at which the buyer sells other goods to the producer of the good; and
(c) the price actually paid or payable is established on the basis of a form of payment extraneous to the good, such as where the good is a semi-finished good that has been provided by the producer to the buyer on condition that the producer will receive a specified quantity of the finished good from the buyer.
(4) For purposes of subsection (2)(b), conditions or considerations relating to the production or marketing of the good shall not render the transaction value unacceptable, such as where the buyer undertakes on the buyer's own account, even though by agreement with the producer, activities relating to the marketing of the good.
(5) Where objective and quantifiable data do not exist with regard to the additions required to be made to the price actually paid or payable under section 4(1) of Schedule II, the transaction value cannot be determined under the provisions of section 2 of that Schedule. For an illustration of this, a royalty is paid on the basis of the price actually paid or payable in a sale of a liter of a particular good that was purchased by the kilogram and made up into a solution. If the royalty is based partially on the purchased good and partially on other factors that have nothing to do with that good, such as when the purchased good is mixed with other ingredients and is no longer separately identifiable, or when the royalty cannot be distinguished from special financial arrangements between the producer and the buyer, it would be inappropriate to add the royalty and the transaction value of the good could not be determined. However, if the amount of the royalty is based only on the purchased good and can be readily quantified, an addition to the price actually paid or payable can be made and the transaction value can be determined.
SECTION 3.
(1) In determining whether the transaction value is unacceptable under section 2(2)(d), the fact that the producer and the buyer are related persons shall not in itself be grounds for the customs administration to render the transaction value unacceptable. In such cases, the circumstances surrounding the sale shall be examined and the transaction value shall be accepted provided that the relationship between the producer and the buyer did not influence the price actually paid or payable. Where the customs administration has reasonable grounds for considering that the relationship between the producer and the buyer influenced the price, the customs administration shall communicate the grounds to the producer, and that producer shall be given a reasonable opportunity to respond to the grounds communicated by the customs administration. If that producer so requests, the customs administration shall communicate in writing the grounds on which it considers that the relationship between the producer and the buyer influenced the price actually paid or payable.
(2) Subsection (1) provides that, where the producer and the buyer are related persons, the circumstances surrounding the sale shall be examined and the transaction value shall be accepted as the value provided that the relationship between the producer and the buyer did not influence the price actually paid or payable. It is not intended under subsection (1) that there should be an examination of the circumstances in all cases where the producer and the buyer are related persons. Such an examination will only be required where the customs administration has doubts that the price actually paid or payable is acceptable because of the relationship between the producer and the buyer. Where the customs administration does not have doubts that the price actually paid or payable is acceptable, it shall accept that price without requesting further information. For an illustration of this, the customs administration may have previously examined the relationship between the producer and the buyer, or it may already have detailed information concerning the relationship between the producer and the buyer, and may already be satisfied from that examination or information that the relationship between them did not influence the price actually paid or payable.
(3) In applying subsection (1), where the producer and the buyer are related persons and the customs administration has doubts that the transaction value is acceptable without further inquiry, the customs administration shall give the producer an opportunity to supply such further information as may be necessary to enable it to examine the circumstances surrounding the sale. In such a case, the customs administration shall examine the relevant aspects of the sale, including the way in which the producer and the buyer organize their commercial relations and the way in which the price actually paid or payable for the good being valued was arrived at, in order to determine whether the relationship between the producer and the buyer influenced that price actually paid or payable. Where it can be shown that the producer and the buyer buy from and sell to each other as if they were not related persons, the price actually paid or payable shall be considered as not having been influenced by the relationship between them. For an illustration of this, if the price actually paid or payable for the good had been settled in a manner consistent with the normal pricing practices of the industry in question or with the way in which the producer settles prices for sales to unrelated buyers, the price actually paid or payable shall be considered as not having been influenced by the relationship between the buyer and the producer. As another illustration, where it is shown that the price actually paid or payable for the good is adequate to ensure recovery of the total cost of producing the good plus a profit that is representative of the producer's overall profit realized over a representative period of time, such as on an annual basis, in sales of goods of the same class or kind, the price actually paid or payable shall be considered as not having been influenced by the relationship between the producer and the buyer.
(4) In a sale between a producer and a buyer who are related persons, the transaction value shall be accepted and determined in accordance with section 2 of Schedule II wherever the producer demonstrates that the transaction value of the good in that sale closely approximates a test value referred to in subsection (5).
(5) The value to be used as a test value shall be the transaction value of identical goods or similar goods sold at or about the same time as the good being valued is sold to an unrelated buyer who is located in the territory of the NAFTA country in which the buyer is located.
(6) In applying a test value referred to in subsection (4), due account shall be taken of demonstrated differences in commercial levels, quantity levels, the value of the elements specified in section 4(1)(b) of Schedule II and the costs incurred by the producer in sales to unrelated buyers that are not incurred by the producer in sales to a related person.
(7) The application of the test value referred to in subsection (4) shall be used at the initiative of the producer and shall be used only for comparison purposes to determine whether the transaction value of the good is acceptable. The test value shall not be used as the transaction value of that good.
(8) Subsection (4) provides an opportunity for the producer to demonstrate that the transaction value closely approximates a test value previously accepted by the customs administration, and is therefore acceptable under subsections (1) and (4). Where the application of a test value under subsection (4) demonstrates that the transaction value of the good being valued is acceptable, the customs administration shall not examine the question of influence in regard to the relationship between the producer and the buyer under subsection (1). Where the customs administration already has sufficient information available, without further inquiries, that the transaction value closely approximates a test value referred to in subsection (4), the producer is not required to apply a test value to demonstrate that the transaction value is acceptable under that subsection.
(9) A number of factors must be taken into consideration for the purpose of determining whether the transaction value of the identical goods or similar goods closely approximates the transaction value of the good being valued. These factors include the nature of the good, the nature of the industry itself, the season in which the good is sold, and whether the difference in values is commercially significant. Since these factors may vary from case to case, it would be impossible to apply an acceptable standardized difference such as a fixed amount or fixed percentage difference in each case. For an illustration of this, a small difference in value in a case involving one type of good could be unacceptable, while a large difference in a case involving another type of good might be acceptable for the purposes of determining whether the transaction value closely approximates a test value set out in subsection (4).
SCHEDULE IV
LIST OF TARIFF PROVISIONS FOR THE PURPOSES OF SECTION 9 OF THE APPENDIX
4009
4010.31 through 4010.34 and 4010.39.10 through 4010.39.20
4011
4016.93.10
4016.99.30 and 4016.99.55
7007.11 and 7007.21
7009.10
8301.20
8407.31
8407.32
8407.33
8407.34.05, 8407.34.15 and 8407.34.25
8407.34.35, 8407.34.45 and 8407.34.55
8408.20
8409
8413.30
8414.59.30
8414.80.05
8415.20
8421.39.40
8481.20, 8481.30 and 8481.80
8482.10 through 8482.80
8483.10 through 8483.40
8483.50
8501.10
8501.20
8501.31
8501.32.45
8507.20.40, 8507.30.40, 8507.40.40 and 8507.80.40
8511.30
8511.40
8511.50
8512.20
8512.40
8519.93
8527.21
8527.29
8536.50
8536.90
8537.10.60
8539.10
8539.21
8544.30
8706
8707
8708.10.30
8708.21
8708.29.20
8708.29.10
8708.29.15
8708.39
8708.40
8708.50
8708.60
8708.70.05, 8708.70.25 and 8708.70.45
8708.80
8708.91
8708.92
8708.93.15 and 8708.93.60
8708.94
8708.99.03, 8708.99.27 and 8708.99.55
8708.99.06, 8708.99.31 and 8708.99.58
8708.99.09, 8708.99.34 and 8708.99.61
8708.99.12, 8708.99.37 and 8708.99.64
8708.99.15, 8708.99.40 and 8708.99.67
8708.99.18, 8708.99.43 and 8708.99.70
8708.99.21, 8708.99.46 and 8708.99.73
8708.99.24, 8708.99.49 and 8708.99.80
9031.80
9032.89
9401.20
SCHEDULE V
LIST OF AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS AND MATERIALS FOR THE PURPOSES OF SECTION 10 OF THE APPENDIX
Item Column I automotive components Column II listed materials
1. Engines provided for in heading 8407 or 8408 Cast blocks, cast heads, fuel nozzles, fuel injector pumps, glow plugs, turbochargers, superchargers, electronic engine controls, intake manifolds, exhaust manifolds, intake valves, exhaust valves, crankshafts, camshafts, alternators, starters, air cleaner assemblies, pistons, connecting rods and assemblies made therefrom, rotor assemblies for rotary engines, flywheels (for manual transmissions), flexplates (for automatic transmissions), oil pans, oil pumps, pressure regulators, water pumps, crankshaft gears, camshaft gears, radiator assemblies, charge-air coolers.
2. Gear boxes (transmissions) provided for in subheading 8708.40 (a) For manual transmissions: transmission cases and clutch housings; clutches; internal shifting mechanisms; gear sets, synchronizers and shafts; and
(b) For torque convertor type transmissions: transmission cases and convertor housings; torque convertor assemblies; gear sets and clutches; electronic transmission controls.
SCHEDULE VI
REGIONAL VALUE-CONTENT CALCULATION FOR CAMI
SECTION 1. Definitions.
In this Schedule,
“closed” means, with respect to a plant, a closure
(a) for purposes of re-tooling for a change in model line, or
(b) as a result of any event or circumstance (other than the imposition of antidumping duties or countervailing duties, or an interruption of operations resulting from a labor strike, lock-out, labor dispute, picketing or boycott of or by employees of CAMI Automotive, Inc. or General Motors of Canada Limited) that CAMI Automotive, Inc. or General Motors of Canada Limited could not reasonably have been expected to avert by corrective action or by exercise of due care and diligence, including a shortage of materials, failure of utilities, or inability to obtain or a delay in obtaining raw materials, parts, fuel or utilities;
“GM” means General Motors of Canada Limited, General Motors Corporation, General Motors de Mexico, S.A. de C.V., and any subsidiary directly or indirectly owned by any of them, or by any combination thereof;
“producer” means CAMI Automotive, Inc.
SECTION 2.
For purposes of section 11 of this appendix, for purposes of determining the regional value content, in a fiscal year, of a motor vehicle of a class of motor vehicles or a model line produced by the producer in the territory of Canada and imported into the territory of the United States, the producer may choose to calculate the regional value content by
(a) calculating
(i) the sum of
(A) the net cost incurred by the producer, during that fiscal year, in the production in the territory of Canada of motor vehicles of a category referred to in section 3 that is chosen by the producer, and
(B) the net cost incurred by General Motors of Canada Limited, during the fiscal year that corresponds most closely to the producer's fiscal year, in the production in the territory of Canada of a corresponding class of motor vehicles or model line, and
(ii) the sum of
(A) the value, determined in accordance with section 9 of this appendix for light-duty vehicles and section 10 of this appendix for heavy-duty vehicles, of the non-originating materials that are used by the producer, during that fiscal year, in the production in the territory of Canada of motor vehicles of a category referred to in section 2.1 that is chosen by the producer, and
(B) the value, determined in accordance with section 9 of this appendix for light-duty vehicles and section 10 of this appendix for heavy-duty vehicles, of the non-originating materials that are used by General Motors of Canada Limited, during the fiscal year that corresponds most closely to the producer's fiscal year, in the production in the territory of Canada of a corresponding class of motor vehicles or model line, and
(b) using the sums referred to in paragraphs (a)(i) and (ii) as the net cost and the value of non-originating materials, respectively, in the calculation referred to in section 6(3) of this appendix,
provided that
(c) at the beginning of the producer's fiscal year, General Motors of Canada Limited owns 50 percent or more of the voting common stock of the producer, and
(d) GM acquires 75 percent or more by unit of quantity of the class of motor vehicles or model line, as the case may be, that the producer produced in the territory of Canada in the producer's fiscal year for sale in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries.
SECTION 3.
The categories referred to in clauses 2(a)(i)(A) and (ii)(A) are the following:
(a) the class of motor vehicles that the producer produced in the territory of Canada in the producer's fiscal year for sale in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries; and
(b) the model line that the producer produced in the territory of Canada in the producer's fiscal year for sale in the territory of one or more of the NAFTA countries.
SECTION 4.
Where GM does not satisfy the requirement set out in section 2(d), the producer may choose that the regional value content be calculated in accordance with section 2 only for those motor vehicles that are acquired by GM for distribution under the GEO marque or another GM marque.
SECTION 5.
(1) The producer may choose that the calculation referred to in section 2 be made over a period of two fiscal years where
(a) any plant operated by the producer or by General Motors of Canada Limited is closed for more than two consecutive months; and
(b) the motor vehicles of a category referred to in section 3, with respect to which the producer chooses that the regional value content be calculated in accordance with section 2, are produced in that plant.
(2) Subject to subsection (3), the period of two fiscal years referred to in subsection (1) corresponds to the fiscal year in which the plant is closed and, at the choice of the producer, the preceding or the subsequent fiscal year.
(3) Where the plant is closed for a period that spans two fiscal years, the calculation referred to in section 2 may be made only over those two fiscal years.
(4) Where the producer has chosen that the regional value content be calculated over two fiscal years under this section, the choice referred to in section 11(6) of this appendix shall be filed not later than 10 days after the end of the period during which the plant is closed, or at such later time as the customs administration may accept.
SECTION 6.
For purposes of this Schedule, a motor vehicle producer shall be deemed to be GM where, as a result of an amalgamation, reorganization, division or similar transaction, that motor vehicle producer
(a) acquires all or substantially all of the assets used by GM, and
(b) directly or indirectly controls, or is controlled by, GM, or both that motor vehicle producer and GM are controlled by the same person.
SCHEDULE VII
REASONABLE ALLOCATION OF COSTS
SECTION 1. Definitions.
For purposes of this Schedule,
“costs” means any costs that are included in total cost and that need to be allocated pursuant to sections 5(9), 6(11) and 7(6) and sections 10(1)(a)(i) and (ii) of these Regulations, section 4(7) of Schedule II and sections 5(7) and 10(2) of Schedule VIII;
“discontinued operations”, in the case of a producer located in a NAFTA country, has the meaning set out in that NAFTA country's Generally Accepted Accounting Principles;
“indirect overhead” means period costs and other costs;
“internal management purpose” means any purpose relating to tax reporting, financial reporting, financial planning, decision-making, pricing, cost recovery, cost control management or performance measurement; and
“overhead” means costs, other than direct material costs and direct labor costs.
SECTION 2. Interpretation.
(1) In this Schedule, reference to “producer” shall, for purposes of section 4(7) of Schedule II, be read as a reference to “buyer”.
(2) In this Schedule, reference to “good” shall,
(a) for purposes of section 6(14) of this appendix, be read as a reference to “identical goods or similar goods, or any combination thereof”;
(b) for purposes of section 7(6) of this appendix, be read as a reference to “intermediate material”;
(c) for purposes of section 11 of this appendix, be read as a reference to “category of vehicles that is chosen pursuant to section 11(1) of this appendix”;
(d) for purposes of section 12 of this appendix, be read as a reference to “category of goods chosen pursuant to section 12(1) of this appendix”;
(e) for purposes of section 13(4) of this appendix, be read as a reference to “category of vehicles chosen pursuant to section 13(4) of this appendix”;
(f) for purposes of section 4(7) of Schedule II, be read as a reference to “packaging materials and containers or the elements”; and
(g) for purposes of section 5(7) of Schedule VIII, be read as a reference to “elements”.
Methods to Reasonably Allocate Costs
SECTION 3.
(1) Where a producer of a good is using, for an internal management purpose, a cost allocation method to allocate to the good direct material costs, or part thereof, and that method reasonably reflects the direct material used in the production of the good based on the criterion of benefit, cause or ability to bear, that method shall be used to reasonably allocate the costs to the good.
(2) Where a producer of a good is using, for an internal management purpose, a cost allocation method to allocate to the good direct labor costs, or part thereof, and that method reasonably reflects the direct labor used in the production of the good based on the criterion of benefit, cause or ability to bear, that method shall be used to reasonably allocate the costs to the good.
(3) Where a producer of a good is using, for an internal management purpose, a cost allocation method to allocate to the good overhead, or part thereof, and that method is based on the criterion of benefit, cause or ability to bear, that method shall be used to reasonably allocate the costs to the good.
SECTION 4.
Where costs are not reasonably allocated to a good under section 3, those costs are reasonably allocated to the good if they are allocated,
(a) with respect to direct material costs, on the basis of any method that reasonably reflects the direct material used in the production of the good based on the criterion of benefit, cause or ability to bear;
(b) with respect to direct labor costs, on the basis of any method that reasonably reflects the direct labor used in the production of the good based on the criterion of benefit, cause or ability to bear; and
(c) with respect to overhead, on the basis of any of the following methods:
(i) the method set out in Addendum A, Addendum B or Addendum C,
(ii) a method based on a combination of the methods set out in Addenda A and B or Addenda A and C, and
(iii) a cost allocation method based on the criterion of benefit, cause or ability to bear.
SECTION 4.1.
Nothwithstanding section 3 and 7, where a producer allocates, for an internal management purpose, costs to a good that is not produced in the period in which the costs are expensed on the books of the producer (such as costs with respect to research and development, and obsolete materials), those costs shall be considered reasonably allocated if
(a) for purposes of section 6(11), they are allocated to a good that is produced in the period in which the costs are expensed, and
(b) the good produced in that period is within a group or range of goods, including identical goods or similar goods, that is produced by the same industry or industry sector as the goods to which the costs are expensed.
SECTION 5.
Any cost allocation method referred to in section 3, 4 or 4.1 that is used by a producer for the purposes of this appendix shall be used throughout the producer's fiscal year.
Costs Not Reasonably Allocated
SECTION 6.
The allocation to a good of any of the following is considered not to be reasonably allocated to the good:
(a) costs of a service provided by a producer of a good to another person where the service is not related to the good;
(b) gains or losses resulting from the disposition of a discontinued operation, except gains or losses related to the production of the good;
(c) cumulative effects of accounting changes reported in accordance with a specific requirement of the applicable Generally Accepted Accounting Principles; and”.
(d) gains or losses resulting from the sale of a capital asset of the producer.
SECTION 7.
Any costs allocated under section 3 on the basis of a cost allocation method that is used for an internal management purpose that is solely for the purpose of qualifying a good as an originating good are considered not to be reasonably allocated.
ADDENDUM A
COST RATIO METHOD
Calculation of Cost Ratio
For the overhead to be allocated, the producer may choose one or more allocation bases that reflect a relationship between the overhead and the good based on the criterion of benefit, cause or ability to bear.
With respect to each allocation base that is chosen by the producer for allocating overhead, a cost ratio is calculated for each good produced by the producer in accordance with the following formula:

Title 19 published on 2014-04-01

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