20 CFR 322.9 - Subsidiary remuneration.

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§ 322.9 Subsidiary remuneration.
(a) Definition. The term “subsidiary remuneration” means remuneration not in excess of an average of $15 per day for the period with respect to which it is payable or accrues, if
(1) The work from which the remuneration derives requires substantially less than full time as determined by generally prevailing standards; and
(2) The work is susceptible of performance at such times and under such circumstances as not to be inconsistent with the holding of normal full-time employment in another occupation.
(b) Exception. If a claimant's remuneration is “compensation” as defined in part 302 of this chapter, such remuneration is not subsidiary unless the claimant had base year compensation from a different position or occupation of not less than two and one-half times the monthly compensation base for months in the base year in which he or she received the remuneration. Compensation in excess of an average of $15 per day is remuneration for the days for which it is payable or accrues.
(c) Period for which remuneration is payable or accrues. The “period” of time used in determining whether remuneration averages more than $15 per day depends on the terms and conditions of the employment and the rate of payment for the work. If the claimant is paid a monthly salary, the “month” is the period with respect to which the pay must average not more than $15 per day. The average is the monthly salary divided by 30. If the claimant is paid a weekly salary, the amount of the salary is divided by seven. If the claimant is paid by the hour or the day, the “period” is the day. Where payment is made by the hour or the day, the pay is not added up and then averaged out over the week or the month. For example, earnings of $20 on one day and $10 on another day do not average out to $15 per day so as to permit both days to be considered as days of unemployment or days of sickness.
(d) Substantially less than full time. The phrase “substantially less than full time” means employment of not more than four hours per day.
(e) Compatibility with full time employment. Work is considered to be susceptible of performance at such times and under such circumstances as not to be inconsistent with the holding of normal full-time employment in another position or occupation if it is a form of secondary employment that a claimant has done or could do at his or her own convenience while performing the duties of his or her railroad job.
(f) Determinations. The Board shall make a determination whether remuneration is subsidiary by applying the standards in this section to the facts of each case. Earnings that average more than $15 per day are not subsidiary remuneration under any circumstances. Also, earnings of any amount that are included in a claimant's qualifying base year compensation are not subsidiary remuneration. Even if earnings do not exceed an average of $15 per day, they may still not be subsidiary remuneration if the claimant worked more than four hours per day or if the work had to be performed at such times and under such circumstances as to be inconsistent with the holding of normal full-time work in his or her regular railroad work. If the evidence does not establish that the earnings are subsidiary remuneration, the question whether they are remuneration for particular days will then be considered.
(g) Examples. The following examples illustrate this section.
(1) A claimant receives a salary of $350 per month for serving as secretary-treasurer of the local lodge of his union. He performs a variety of duties at his own convenience while holding down a full-time railroad job in his craft. The average payment per day is not more than $15 and is, therefore, subsidiary remuneration.
(2) A claimant worked three hours per day, at $5 per hour, in the family insurance business. He was marked up for work as an extra board trainman and worked whenever he was called. When called, he skipped work in the family insurance business. His insurance earnings of $15 per day were subsidiary remuneration.
(3) While unemployed from her railroad job, a claimant took a job as a school bus driver. She worked from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m., and 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Her regular railroad job was a daytime job from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Her pay as a school bus driver was not subsidiary remuneration because the job was not compatible with the holding of full time work in her regular railroad occupation.
[65 FR 14460, Mar. 17, 2000]

Title 20 published on 2012-04-01

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U.S. Code: Title 45 - RAILROADS