20 CFR 404.241 - 1977 simplified old-start method.

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§ 404.241 1977 simplified old-start method.
(a) Who is qualified. To qualify for the old-start computation, you must meet the conditions in paragraphs (a) (1), (2), or (3) of this section:
(1) You must—
(i) Have one “quarter of coverage” (see §§ 404.101 and 404.110 of this part) before 1951;
(ii) Have attained age 21 after 1936 and before 1950, or attained age 22 after 1950 and earned fewer than 6 quarters of coverage after 1950;
(iii) Have not had a period of disability which began before 1951, unless it can be disregarded, as explained in § 404.320 of this part; and,
(iv) Have attained age 62, become disabled, or died, after 1977.
(2)
(i) You or your survivor becomes entitled to benefits for June 1992 or later;
(ii) You do not meet the conditions in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, and,
(iii) No person is entitled to benefits on your earnings record in the month before the month you or your survivor becomes entitled to benefits.
(3) A recomputation is first effective for June 1992 or later based on your earnings for 1992 or later.
(b) Steps in old-start computation.
(1) First, we allocate your earnings during the period 1937-1950 as described in paragraph (c) of this section.
(2) Next, we compute your average monthly wage, as described in paragraph (d) of this section.
(3) Next, we apply the old-start formula to your average monthly wage, as described in paragraph (e)(1) of this section.
(4) Next, we apply certain increments to the amount computed in step (3), as described in paragraph (e)(2) of this section.
(5) Next, we find your primary insurance amount in the benefit table in appendix III, as described in paragraph (f)(1) of this section.
(6) Then, we apply automatic cost-of-living or ad hoc increases in primary insurance amounts to the primary insurance amount found in step (5), as described in paragraph (f)(2) of this section.
(c) Finding your computation base years under the old-start method.
(1) Instead of using your actual year-by-year earnings before 1951, we find your computation base years for 1937-1950 (and the amount of earnings for each of them) by allocating your total 1937-1950 earnings among the years before 1951 under the following procedure:
(i) If you reached age 21 before 1950 and your total 1937-1950 earnings are not more than $3,000 times the number of years after the year you reached age 20 and before 1951 (a maximum of 14 years), we allocate your earnings equally among those years, and those years are your computation base years before 1951.
(ii) If you reached age 21 before 1950 and your total 1937-1950 earnings are more than $3,000 times the number of years after the year you reached age 20 and before 1951, we allocate your earnings at the rate of $3,000 per year for each year after you reached age 20 and before 1951 up to a maximum of 14 years. We credit any remainder in reverse order to years before age 21 in $3,000 increments and any amount left over of less than $3,000 to the year before the earliest year to which we credited $3,000. No more than $42,000 may be credited in this way and to no more than 14 years. Those years are your computation base years before 1951.
(iii) If you reached age 21 in 1950 or later and your total pre-1951 earnings are $3,000 or less, we credit the total to the year you reached age 20 and that year is your pre-1951 computation base year.
(iv) If you reached age 21 in 1950 or later and your total pre-1951 earnings are more than $3,000, we credit $3,000 to the year you reached age 20 and credit the remainder to earlier years (or year) in blocks of $3,000 in reverse order. We credit any remainder of less than $3,000 to the year before the earliest year to which we had credited $3,000. No more than $42,000 may be credited in this way and to no more than 14 years. Those years are your computation base years before 1951.
(v) If you die before 1951, we allocate your 1937-1950 earnings under paragraphs (c)(1) (i) through (iv), except that in determining the number of years, we will use the year of death instead of 1951. If you die before you attain age 21, the number of years in the period is equal to 1.
(vi) For purposes of paragraphs (c)(1) (i) through (v), if you had a period of disability which began before 1951, we will exclude the years wholly within a period of disability in determining the number of years.
(2)
(i) All years after 1950 up to (but not including) the year you become entitled to old-age insurance or disability insurance benefits (or through the year you die if you had not become entitled to old-age or disability benefits) are also computation base years for you.
(ii) Years wholly within a period of disability are not computation base years unless your primary insurance amount would be higher if they were. In such situations, we count all the years during the period of disability, even if you had no earnings in some of them.
Example:
Ms. D reaches age 62 in June 1979. Her total 1937-1950 social security earnings are $40,000 and she had social security earnings of $7,100 in 1976 and $6,300 in 1977. Since she reaches age 62 after 1978, we first compute her primary insurance amount under the average-indexed-monthly-earnings method (§§ 404.210 through 404.212). As of June 1981, it is $170.50, which is the minimum primary insurance amount applicable, because her average indexed monthly earnings of $50 would yield only $56.50 under the benefit formula. Ms. D reached age 62 after 1978 but before 1984 and her guaranteed alternative under the average-monthly-wage method as of June 1981 is $170.30, which is the minimum primary insurance amount based on average monthly wages of $48. (These amounts include the 9.9, the 14.3, and the 11.2 percent cost-of-living increases effective June 1979, June 1980, and June 1981 respectively.)
Ms. D is also eligible for the old-start method. We first allocate $3,000 of her 1937-1950 earnings to each of her 13 computation base years starting with the year she reached age 21 (1938) and ending with 1950. The remaining $1,000 is credited to the year she reached age 20. Ms. D, then, has 42 computation base years (14 before 1951 and 28 after 1950).
(d) Computing your average monthly wage under the old-start method.
(1) First, we count your elapsed years, which are the years beginning with 1937 (or the year you reach 22, if later) and ending with the year before you reach age 62, or become disabled or die before age 62. (See § 404.211(e)(1) for the rule on how we treat years wholly or partially within a period of disability.)
(2) Next, we subtract 5 from the number of your elapsed years, and this is the number of computation years we must use. We then choose this number of your computation base years in which you had the highest earnings. These years are your benefit computation years. You must have at least 2 benefit computation years.
(3) Then we compute your average monthly wage by dividing your total creditable earnings in your benefit computation years by the number of months in these years and rounding the quotient to the next lower dollar if not already a multiple of $1.
(e) Old-start computation formula. We use the following formula to compute your primary insurance benefit, which we will convert to your primary insurance amount:
(1) We take 40 percent of the first $50 of your average monthly wage, plus 10 percent of the next $200 of your average monthly wage up to a total average monthly wage of $250. (We do not use more than $250 of your average monthly wage.)
(2) We increase the amount found in paragraph (e)(1) of this section by 1 percent for each $1,650 in your pre-1951 earnings, disregarding any remainder less than $1,650. We always increase the amount by at least 4 of these 1 percent increments but may not increase it by more than 14 of them.
(f) Finding your primary insurance amount under the old-start method.
(1) In column I of the benefit table in appendix III we locate the amount (the primary insurance benefit) computed in paragraph (e) of this section and find the corresponding primary insurance amount on the same line in column IV of the table.
(2) We increase that amount by any automatic cost-of-living or ad hoc increases in primary insurance amounts effective since the beginning of the year in which you reached age 62, or became disabled or died before age 62. (See §§ 404.270 through 404.277.)
Example:
From the example in paragraph (c)(2) of this section, we see that Ms. D's elapsed years total 40 (number of years at ages 22 to 61, both inclusive). Her benefit computation years, therefore, must total 35. Since she has only 16 years of actual earnings, we must include 19 years of zero earnings in this old-start computation to reach the required 35 benefit computation years.
We next divide her total social security earnings ($53,400) by the 420 months in her benefit computation years and find her average monthly wage to be $127.
We apply the old-start computation formula to Ms. D's average monthly wage as follows: 40 percent of the first $50 of her average monthly wage ($20.00), plus 10 percent of the remaining $77 of her average monthly wage ($7.70), for a total of $27.70.
We then apply 14 1-percent increments to that amount, increasing it by $3.88 to $31.58. We find $31.58 in column I of the December 1978 benefit table in appendix III and find her primary insurance amount of $195.90 on the same line in column IV. We apply the 9.9 percent automatic cost-of-living increase effective for June 1979 to $195.90 and get an old-start primary insurance amount of $215.30 which we then increase to $246.10 to reflect the 14.3 percent cost-of-living increase effective for June 1980, and to $273.70 to reflect the June 1981 increase. Since that primary insurance amount is higher than the $153.10 primary insurance amount computed under the average-monthly-wage method and the $153.30 primary insurance amount computed under the average-indexed-monthly-earnings method, we base Ms. D's benefits (and those of her family) on $215.30 (plus later cost-of-living increases), which is the highest primary insurance amount.
[47 FR 30734, July 15, 1982, as amended at 55 FR 21382, May 24, 1990; 57 FR 23157, June 2, 1992]

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  • 2014-08-28; vol. 79 # 167 - Thursday, August 28, 2014
    1. 79 FR 51241 - Extension of the Expiration Date for State Disability Examiner Authority To Make Fully Favorable Quick Disability Determinations and Compassionate Allowances
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      SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
      Final rule.
      This final rule is effective August 28, 2014.
      20 CFR Parts 404 and 416

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United States Code
U.S. Code: Title 31 - MONEY AND FINANCE
U.S. Code: Title 42 - THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE

§ 401 - Trust Funds

§ 402 - Old-age and survivors insurance benefit payments

§ 403 - Reduction of insurance benefits

§ 404 - Overpayments and underpayments

§ 405 - Evidence, procedure, and certification for payments

§ 405 note - Evidence, procedure, and certification for payments

§ 406 - Representation of claimants before Commissioner

§ 409 - “Wages” defined

§ 410 - Definitions relating to employment

§ 410a - Transferred

§ 411 - Definitions relating to self-employment

§ 412 - Self-employment income credited to calendar years

§ 413 - Quarter and quarter of coverage

§ 414 - Insured status for purposes of old-age and survivors insurance benefits

§ 415 - Computation of primary insurance amount

§ 416 - Additional definitions

§ 417 - Benefits for veterans

§ 418 - Voluntary agreements for coverage of State and local employees

§ 418 note - Voluntary agreements for coverage of State and local employees

§ 421 - Disability determinations

§ 421 note - Disability determinations

§ 422 - Rehabilitation services

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§ 424a - Reduction of disability benefits

§ 425 - Additional rules relating to benefits based on disability

§ 428 - Benefits at age 72 for certain uninsured individuals

§ 429 - Benefits in case of members of uniformed services

§ 430 - Adjustment of contribution and benefit base

§ 431 - Benefits for certain individuals interned by United States during World War II

§ 433 - International agreements

§ 902 - Commissioner; Deputy Commissioner; other officers

§ 902 note - Commissioner; Deputy Commissioner; other officers

§ 909 - Delivery of benefit checks

42 U.S. Code § 905, 905a - Transferred

42 U.S. Code § 1320a–8a - Administrative procedure for imposing penalties for false or misleading statements

42 U.S. Code § 905, 905a - Transferred

42 U.S. Code § 905, 905a - Transferred

U.S. Code: Title 48 - TERRITORIES AND INSULAR POSSESSIONS
Statutes at Large

Title 20 published on 2014-04-01

The following are ALL rules, proposed rules, and notices (chronologically) published in the Federal Register relating to 20 CFR 404 after this date.

  • 2014-08-28; vol. 79 # 167 - Thursday, August 28, 2014
    1. 79 FR 51241 - Extension of the Expiration Date for State Disability Examiner Authority To Make Fully Favorable Quick Disability Determinations and Compassionate Allowances
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
      Final rule.
      This final rule is effective August 28, 2014.
      20 CFR Parts 404 and 416