21 CFR 201.23 - Required pediatric studies.

§ 201.23 Required pediatric studies.
(a) A manufacturer of a marketed drug product, including a biological drug product, that is used in a substantial number of pediatric patients, or that provides a meaningful therapeutic benefit over existing treatments for pediatric patients, as defined in §§ 314.55(c)(5) and 601.27(c)(5) of this chapter, but whose label does not provide adequate information to support its safe and effective use in pediatric populations for the approved indications may be required to submit an application containing data adequate to assess whether the drug product is safe and effective in pediatric populations. The application may be required to contain adequate evidence to support dosage and administration in some or all pediatric subpopulations, including neonates, infants, children, and adolescents, depending upon the known or appropriate use of the drug product in such subpopulations. The applicant may also be required to develop a pediatric formulation for a drug product that represents a meaningful therapeutic benefit over existing therapies for pediatric populations for whom a pediatric formulation is necessary, unless the manufacturer demonstrates that reasonable attempts to produce a pediatric formulation have failed.
(b) The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) may by order, in the form of a letter, after notifying the manufacturer of its intent to require an assessment of pediatric safety and effectiveness of a pediatric formulation, and after offering an opportunity for a written response and a meeting, which may include an advisory committee meeting, require a manufacturer to submit an application containing the information or request for approval of a pediatric formulation described in paragraph (a) of this section within a time specified in the order, if FDA finds that:
(1) The drug product is used in a substantial number of pediatric patients for the labeled indications and the absence of adequate labeling could pose significant risks to pediatric patients; or
(2) There is reason to believe that the drug product would represent a meaningful therapeutic benefit over existing treatments for pediatric patients for one or more of the claimed indications, and the absence of adequate labeling could pose significant risks to pediatric patients.
(c)
(1) An applicant may request a full waiver of the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section if the applicant certifies that:
(i) Necessary studies are impossible or highly impractical because, e.g., the number of such patients is so small or geographically dispersed, or
(ii) There is evidence strongly suggesting that the product would be ineffective or unsafe in all pediatric age groups.
(2) An applicant may request a partial waiver of the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section with respect to a specified pediatric age group, if the applicant certifies that:
(i) The product:
(A) Does not represent a meaningful therapeutic benefit over existing therapies for pediatric patients in that age group, and
(B) Is not likely to be used in a substantial number of patients in that age group, and
(C) The absence of adequate labeling could not pose significant risks to pediatric patients; or
(ii) Necessary studies are impossible or highly impractical because, e.g., the number of patients in that age group is so small or geographically dispersed, or
(iii) There is evidence strongly suggesting that the product would be ineffective or unsafe in that age group, or
(iv) The applicant can demonstrate that reasonable attempts to produce a pediatric formulation necessary for that age group have failed.
(3) FDA shall grant a full or partial waiver, as appropriate, if the agency finds that there is a reasonable basis on which to conclude that one or more of the grounds for waiver specified in paragraphs (c)(2) or (c)(3) of this section have been met. If a waiver is granted on the ground that it is not possible to develop a pediatric formulation, the waiver will cover only those pediatric age groups requiring that formulation. If a waiver is granted because there is evidence that the product would be ineffective or unsafe in pediatric populations, this information will be included in the product's labeling.
(d) If a manufacturer fails to submit a supplemental application containing the information or request for approval of a pediatric formulation described in paragraph (a) of this section within the time specified by FDA, the drug product may be considered misbranded or an unapproved new drug or unlicensed biologic.
[63 FR 66668, Dec. 2, 1998]

Title 21 published on 2013-04-01

no entries appear in the Federal Register after this date.