26 CFR 1.48-1 - Definition of section 38 property.

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§ 1.48-1 Definition of section 38 property.
(a) In general. Property which qualifies for the credit allowed by section 38 is known as “section 38 property”. Except as otherwise provided in this section, the term “section 38 property” means property (1) with respect to which depreciation (or amortization in lieu of depreciation) is allowable to the taxpayer, (2) which has an estimated useful life of 3 years or more (determined as of the time such property is placed in service), and (3) which is (i) tangible personal property, (ii) other tangible property (not including a building and its structural components) but only if such other property is used as an integral part of manufacturing, production, or extraction, or an integral part of furnishing transportation, communications, electrical energy, gas, water, or sewage disposal services by a person engaged in a trade or business of furnishing any such service, or is a research or storage facility used in connection with any of the foregoing activities, (iii) an elevator or escalator which satisfies the conditions of section 48(a)(1)(C), or (iv) in the case of a qualified rehabilitated building, that portion of the basis which is attributable to qualified rehabilitation expenditures. The determination of whether property qualifies as section 38 property in the hands of the taxpayer for purposes of the credit allowed by section 38 must be made with respect to the first taxable year in which such property is placed in service by the taxpayer. See paragraph (d) of § 1.46-3. For the meaning of “estimated useful life”, see paragraph (e) of § 1.46-3. In the case of property which is not described in section 50, this paragraph shall be applied by substituting “4 years” for “3 years”.
(b) Depreciation allowable.
(1) Property (with the exception of property described in section 48(a)(1)(F) and paragraph (p) of this section) is not section 38 property unless a deduction for depreciation (or amortization in lieu of depreciation) with respect to such property is allowable to the taxpayer for the taxable year. A deduction for depreciation is allowable if the property is of a character subject to the allowance for depreciation under section 167 and the basis (or cost) of the property is recovered through a method of depreciation, including, for example, the unit of production method and the retirement method as well as methods of depreciation which measure the life of the property in terms of years. If property is placed in service (within the meaning of paragraph (d) of § 1.46-3) in a trade or business (or in the production of income), but under the taxpayer's depreciation practice the period for depreciation with respect to such property begins in a taxable year subsequent to the taxable year in which such property is placed in service, then a deduction for depreciation shall be treated as allowable with respect to such property in the earlier taxable year (or years). Thus, for example, if a machine is placed in service in a trade or business in 1963, but the period for depreciation with respect to such machine begins in 1964, because the taxpayer uses an averaging convention (see § 1.167(a)-10) in computing depreciation, then, for purposes of determining whether the machine qualifies as section 38 property, a deduction for depreciation shall be treated as allowable in 1963.
(2) If, for the taxable year in which property is placed in service, a deduction for depreciation is allowable to the taxpayer only with respect to a part of such property, then only the proportionate part of the property with respect to which such deduction is allowable qualifies as section 38 property for the purpose of determining the amount of credit allowable under section 38. Thus, for example, if property is used 80 percent of the time in a trade or business and is used 20 percent of the time for personal purposes, only 80 percent of the basis (or cost) of such property qualifies as section 38 property. Further, property does not qualify to the extent that a deduction for depreciation thereon is disallowed under section 274 (relating to disallowance of certain entertainment, etc., expenses).
(3) If the cost of property is not recovered through a method of depreciation but through a deduction of the full cost in one taxable year, for purposes of subparagraph (1) of this paragraph a deduction for depreciation with respect to such property is not allowable to the taxpayer. However, if an adjustment with respect to the income tax return for such taxable year requires the cost of such property to be recovered through a method of depreciation, a deduction for depreciation will be considered as allowable to the taxpayer.
(4) If depreciation sustained on property is not an allowable deduction for the taxable year but is added to the basis of property being constructed, reconstructed, or erected by the taxpayer, for purposes of subparagraph (1) of this paragraph a deduction for depreciation shall be treated as allowable for the taxable year with respect to the property on which depreciation is sustained. Thus, if $1,000 of depreciation sustained with respect to property No. 1, which is placed in service in 1964 by taxpayer A, is not allowable to A as a deduction for 1964 but is added to the basis of property being constructed by A (property no. 2), for purposes of subparagraph (1) of this paragraph a deduction for depreciation shall be treated as allowable to A for 1964 with respect to property no. 1. However, the $1,000 amount is not included in the basis of property no. 2 for purposes of determining A's qualified investment with respect to property no. 2. See paragraph (c)(1) of § 1.46-3.
(c) Definition of tangible personal property. If property is tangible personal property it may qualify as section 38 property irrespective of whether it is used as an integral part of an activity (or constitutes a research or storage facility used in connection with such activity) specified in paragraph (a) of this section. Local law shall not be controlling for purposes of determining whether property is or is not “tangible” or “personal”. Thus, the fact that under local law property is held to be personal property or tangible property shall not be controlling. Conversely, property may be personal property for purposes of the investment credit even though under local law the property is considered to be a fixture and therefore real property. For purposes of this section, the term “tangible personal property” means any tangible property except land and improvements thereto, such as buildings or other inherently permanent structures (including items which are structural components of such buildings or structures). Thus, buildings, swimming pools, paved parking areas, wharves and docks, bridges, and fences are not tangible personal property. Tangible personal property includes all property (other than structural components) which is contained in or attached to a building. Thus, such property as production machinery, printing presses, transportation and office equipment, refrigerators, grocery counters, testing equipment, display racks and shelves, and neon and other signs, which is contained in or attached to a building constitutes tangible personal property for purposes of the credit allowed by section 38. Further, all property which is in the nature of machinery (other than structural components of a building or other inherently permanent structure) shall be considered tangible personal property even though located outside a building. Thus, for example, a gasoline pump, hydraulic car lift, or automatic vending machine, although annexed to the ground, shall be considered tangible personal property.
(d) Other tangible property—
(1) In general. In addition to tangible personal property, any other tangible property (but not including a building and its structural components) used as an integral part of manufacturing, production, or extraction, or as an integral part of furnishing transportation, communications, electrical energy, gas, water, or sewage disposal services by a person engaged in a trade or business of furnishing any such service, or which constitutes a research or storage facility used in connection with any of the foregoing activities, may qualify as section 38 property.
(2) Manufacturing, production, and extraction. For purposes of the credit allowed by section 38, the terms “manufacturing”, “production”, and “extraction” include the construction, reconstruction, or making of property out of scrap, salvage, or junk material, as well as from new or raw material, by processing, manipulating, refining, or changing the form of an article, or by combining or assembling two or more articles, and include the cultivation of the soil, the raising of livestock, and the mining of minerals. Thus, section 38 property would include, for example, property used as an integral part of the extracting, processing, or refining of metallic and nonmetallic minerals, including oil, gas, rock, marble, or slate; the construction of roads, bridges, or housing; the processing of meat, fish or other foodstuffs; the cultivation of orchards, gardens, or nurseries; the operation of sawmills, the production of lumber, lumber products or other building materials; the fabrication or treatment of textiles, paper, leather goods, or glass; and the rebuilding, as distinguished from the mere repairing, of machinery.
(3) Transportation and communications businesses. Examples of transportation businesses include railroads, airlines, bus companies, shipping or trucking companies, and oil pipeline companies. Examples of communications businesses include telephone or telegraph companies and radio or television broadcasting companies.
(4) Integral part. In order to qualify for the credit, property (other than tangible personal property and research or storage facilities used in connection with any of the activities specified in subparagraph (1) of this paragraph) must be used as an integral part of one or more of the activities specified in subparagraph (1) of this paragraph. Property such as pavements, parking areas, inherently permanent advertising displays or inherently permanent outdoor lighting facilities, or swimming pools, although used in the operation of a business, ordinarily is not used as an integral part of any of such specified activities. Property is used as an integral part of one of the specified activities if it is used directly in the activity and is essential to the completeness of the activity. Thus, for example, in determining whether property is used as an integral part of manufacturing, all properties used by the taxpayer in acquiring or transporting raw materials or supplies to the point where the actual processing commences (such as docks, railroad tracks and bridges), or in processing raw materials into the taxpayer's final product, would be considered as property used as an integral part of manufacturing. Specific examples of property which normally would be used as an integral part of one of the specified activities are blast furnaces, oil and gas pipelines, railroad tracks and signals, telephone poles, broadcasting towers, oil derricks, and fences used to confine livestock. Property shall be considered used as an integral part of one of the specified activities if so used either by the owner of the property or by the lessee of the property.
(5) Research or storage facilities.
(i) If property (other than a building and its structural components) constitutes a research or storage facility and if it is used in connection with an activity specified in subparagraph (1) of this paragraph, such property may qualify as section 38 property even though it is not used as an integral part of such activity. Examples of research facilities include wind tunnels and test stands. Examples of storage facilities include oil and gas storage tanks and grain storage bins. Although a research or storage facility must be used in connection with, for example, a manufacturing process, the taxpayer-owner of such facility need not be engaged in the manufacturing process.
(ii) In the case of property described in section 50, property will constitute a storage facility only if the facility is used principally for the bulk storage of fungible commodities. Bulk storage means the storage of a commodity in a large mass prior to its consumption or utilization. Thus, if a facility is used to store oranges that have been sorted and boxed, it is not used for bulk storage.
(e) Definition of building and structural components.
(1) Generally, buildings and structural components thereof do not qualify as section 38 property. See, however, section 48 (a)(1)(E) and (g), and § 1.48-11 (relating to investment credit for qualified rehabilitated building). The term “building” generally means any structure or edifice enclosing a space within its walls, and usually covered by a roof, the purpose of which is, for example, to provide shelter or housing, or to provide working, office, parking, display, or sales space. The term includes, for example, structures such as apartment houses, factory and office buildings, warehouses, barns, garages, railway or bus stations, and stores. Such term includes any such structure constructed by, or for, a lessee even if such structure must be removed, or ownership of such structure reverts to the lessor, at the termination of the lease. Such term does not include (i) a structure which is essentially an item of machinery or equipment, or (ii) a structure which houses property used as an integral part of an activity specified in section 48(a)(1)(B)(i) if the use of the structure is so closely related to the use of such property that the structure clearly can be expected to be replaced when the property it initially houses is replaced. Factors which indicate that a structure is closely related to the use of the property it houses include the fact that the structure is specifically designed to provide for the stress and other demands of such property and the fact that the structure could not be economically used for other purposes. Thus, the term “building” does not include such structures as oil and gas storage tanks, grain storage bins, silos, fractionating towers, blast furnaces, basic oxygen furnaces, coke ovens, brick kilns, and coal tipples.
(2) The term “structural components” includes such parts of a building as walls, partitions, floors, and ceilings, as well as any permanent coverings therefor such as paneling or tiling; windows and doors; all components (whether in, on, or adjacent to the building) of a central air conditioning or heating system, including motors, compressors, pipes and ducts; plumbing and plumbing fixtures, such as sinks and bathtubs; electric wiring and lighting fixtures; chimneys; stairs, escalators, and elevators, including all components thereof; sprinkler systems; fire escapes; and other components relating to the operation or maintenance of a building. However, the term “structural components” does not include machinery the sole justification for the installation of which is the fact that such machinery is required to meet temperature or humidity requirements which are essential for the operation of other machinery or the processing of materials or foodstuffs. Machinery may meet the “sole justification” test provided by the preceding sentence even though it incidentally provides for the comfort of employees, or serves, to an insubstantial degree, areas where such temperature or humidity requirements are not essential. For example, an air conditioning and humidification system installed in a textile plant in order to maintain the temperature or humidity within a narrow optimum range which is critical in processing particular types of yarn or cloth is not included within the term “structural components”. For special rules with respect to an elevator or escalator, the construction, reconstruction, or erection of which is completed by the taxpayer after June 30, 1963, or which is acquired after June 30, 1963, and the original use of which commences with the taxpayer and commences after such date, see section 48(a)(1)(C) and paragraph (m) of this section.
(f) Intangible property. Intangible property, such as patents, copyrights, and subscription lists, does not qualify as section 38 property. The cost of intangible property, in the case of a patent or copyright, includes all costs of purchasing or producing the item patented or copyrighted. Thus, in the case of a motion picture or television film or tape, the cost of the intangible property includes manuscript and screenplay costs, the cost of wardrobe and set design, the salaries of cameramen, actors, directors, etc., and all other costs properly includible in the basis of such film or tape. In the case of a book, the cost of the intangible property includes all costs of producing the original copyrighted manuscript, including the cost of illustration, research, and clerical and stenographic help. However, if tangible depreciable property is used in the production of such intangible property, see paragraph (b)(4) of this section.
(g) Property used outside the United States—
(1) General rule.
(i) Except as provided in subparagraph (2) of this paragraph, the term “section 38 property” does not include property which is used predominantly outside the United States (as defined in section 7701(a)(9)) during the taxable year. The determination of whether property is used predominantly outside the United States during the taxable year shall be made by comparing the period of time in such year during which the property is physically located outside the United States with the period of time in such year during which the property is physically located within the United States. If the property is physically located outside the United States during more than 50 percent of the taxable year, such property shall be considered used predominantly outside the United States during that year. If property is placed in service after the first day of the taxable year, the determination of whether such property is physically located outside the United States during more than 50 percent of the taxable year shall be made with respect to the period beginning on the date on which the property is placed in service and ending on the last day of such taxable year.
(ii) Since the determination of whether a credit is allowable to the taxpayer with respect to any property may be made only with respect to the taxable year in which the property is placed in service by the taxpayer, property used predominantly outside the United States during the taxable year in which it is placed in service cannot qualify as section 38 property with respect to such taxpayer, regardless of the fact that the property is permanently returned to the United States in a later year. Furthermore, if property is used predominantly in the United States in the year in which it is placed in service by the taxpayer, and a credit under section 38 is allowed with respect to such property, but such property is thereafter in any one year used predominantly outside the United States, such property ceases to be section 38 property with respect to the taxpayer and is subject to the application of section 47.
(iii) This subparagraph applies whether property is used predominantly outside the United States by the owner of the property, or by the lessee of the property. If property is leased and if the lessor makes a valid election under § 1.48-4 to treat the lessee as having purchased such property for purposes of the credit allowed by section 38, the determination of whether such property is physically located outside the United States during more than 50 percent of the taxable year shall be made with respect to the taxable year of the lessee; however, if the lessor does not make such an election, such determination shall be made with respect to the taxable year of the lessor.
(2) Exceptions. The provisions of subparagraph (1) of this paragraph do not apply to—
(i) Any aircraft which is registered by the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Agency, and which (a) is operated, whether on a scheduled or nonscheduled basis, to and from the United States, or (b) is placed in service by the taxpayer during a taxable year ending after March 9, 1967, and is operated under contract with the United States: Provided, That use of the aircraft under the contract constitutes its principal use outside the United States during the taxable year. The term “to and from the United States” is not intended to exclude an aircraft which makes flights from one point in a foreign country to another such point, as long as such aircraft returns to the United States with some degree of frequency;
(ii) Rolling stock, of a domestic railroad corporation subject to part I of the Interstate Commerce Act, which is used within and without the United States. For purposes of this subparagraph, the term “rolling stock” means locomotives, freight and passenger train cars, floating equipment, and miscellaneous transportation equipment on wheels, the expenditures for which are chargeable (or, in the case of leased property, would be chargeable) to the equipment investment accounts in the uniform system of accounts for railroad companies prescribed by the Interstate Commerce Commission;
(iii) Any vessel documented under the laws of the United States which is operated in the foreign or domestic commerce of the United States. A vessel is documented under the laws of the United States if it is registered, enrolled, or licensed under the laws of the United States by the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard. Vessels operated in the foreign or domestic commerce of the United States include those documented for use in foreign trade, coastwise trade, or fisheries;
(iv) Any motor vehicle of a United States person (as defined in section 7701(a)(30)) which is operated to and from the United States with some degree of frequency;
(v) Any container of a United States person which is used in the transportation of property to and from the United States;
(vi) Any property (other than a vessel or an aircraft) of a U.S. person which is used for the purpose of exploring for, developing, removing, or transporting resources from the outer Continental Shelf (within the meaning of section 2 of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, as amended and supplemented; 43 U.S.C. 1331). Thus for example, offshore drilling equipment may be section 38 property;
(vii) Any property placed in service after December 31, 1965 which (a) is owned by a domestic corporation (other than a corporation entitled to the benefits of section 931 or 934(b)) or by a United States citizen (other than a citizen entitled to the benefits of section 931, 932, 933, or 934(c)), and (b) is used predominantly in a possession of the United States during the taxable year by such a corporation or such a citizen, or by a corporation created or organized in, or under the law of, a possession of the United States. Thus, property placed in service after December 31, 1965, which is owned by a domestic corporation not entitled to the benefits of section 931 or 934(b), which is leased to a corporation organized under the laws of a U.S. possession, and which is used by such lessee predominantly in a possession of the United States may qualify as section 38 property. However, property which is owned by a corporation not entitled to the benefits of section 931 or 934(b) but which is leased to a domestic corporation entitled to such benefits would not qualify as section 38 property. The determination of whether property is used predominantly in a possession of the United States during the taxable year shall be made under principles similar to those described in subparagraph (1) of this paragraph. For example, if a machine is placed in service in a possession of the United States on July 1, 1966, by a calendar year taxpayer and if it is physically located in such a possession during more than 50 percent of the period beginning on July 1, 1966 and ending on December 31, 1966, then such machine shall be considered used predominantly in a possession of the United States during the taxable year 1966;
(viii) Any communications satellite (as defined in section 103(3) of the Communications Satellite Act of 1962, 47 U.S.C., sec. 702(3)), or any interest therein, of a U.S. person;
(ix) Any cable which is property described in section 50, or any interest therein, of a domestic corporation engaged in furnishing telephone service to which section 46(c)(3)(B)(iii) applies (or of a wholly owned domestic subsidiary of such corporation), if such cable is part of a submarine cable system which constitutes part of a communications link exclusively between the United States and one or more foreign countries; and
(x) Any property described in section 50 (other than a vessel or an aircraft) of a U.S. person which is used in international or territorial waters for the purpose of exploring for, developing, removing, or transporting resources from ocean waters or deposits under such waters.
(h) Property used for lodging—
(1) In general.
(i) Except as provided in subparagraph (2) of this paragraph, the term “section 38 property” does not include property which is used predominantly to furnish lodging or is used predominantly in connection with the furnishing of lodging during the taxable year. Property used in the living quarters of a lodging facility, including beds and other furniture, refrigerators, ranges, and other equipment, shall be considered as used predominantly to furnish lodging. The term “lodging facility” includes an apartment house, hotel, motel, dormitory, or any other facility (or part of a facility) where sleeping accommodations are provided and let, except that such term does not include a facility used primarily as a means of transportation (such as an aircraft, vessel, or a railroad car) or used primarily to provide medical or convalescent services, even though sleeping accommodations are provided.
(ii) Property which is used predominantly in the operation of a lodging facility or in serving tenants shall be considered used in connection with the furnishing of lodging, whether furnished by the owner of the lodging facility or another person. Thus, for example, lobby furniture, office equipment, and laundry and swimming pool facilities used in the operation of an apartment house or in serving tenants would be considered used predominantly in connection with the furnishing of lodging. However, property which is used in furnishing, to the management of a lodging facility or its tenants, electrical energy, water, sewage disposal services, gas, telephone service, or other similar services shall not be treated as property used in connection with the furnishing of lodging. Thus, such items as gas and electric meters, telephone poles and lines, telephone station and switchboard equipment, and water and gas mains, furnished by a public utility would not be considered as property used in connection with the furnishing of lodging.
(iii) Notwithstanding any other provision of this paragraph (h), in the case of a qualified rehabilitated building (within the meaning of section 48(g)(1) and § 1.48-12(b)), expenditures for property resulting in basis described in section 48(a)(1)(E) shall not be treated as section 38 property to the extent that such property is attributable to a portion of the building that is used for lodging or in connection with lodging. For example, if expenditures are incurred to rehabilitate a five story qualified rehabilitated building, three floors of which are used for apartments and two floors of which are used as commercial office space, the portion of the basis of the building attributable to qualified rehabilitated expenditures attributable to the commercial part of the building shall not be considered to be expenditures for property, or in connection with property, used predominantly for lodging. Allocation of expenditures between the two portions of the building are to be made using the principles contained in § 1.48-12(C)(10)(ii).
(2) Exceptions—
(i) Nonlodging commercial facility. A nonlodging commercial facility which is available to persons not using the lodging facility on the same basis as it is available to the tenants of the lodging facility shall not be treated as property which is used predominantly to furnish lodging or predominantly in connection with the furnishing of lodging. Examples of non-lodging commercial facilities include restaurants, drug stores, grocery stores, and vending machines located in a lodging facility.
(ii) Property used by a hotel or motel. Property used by a hotel, motel, inn, or other similar establishment, in connection with the trade or business of furnishing lodging shall not be considered as property which is used predominantly to furnish lodging or predominantly in connection with the furnishing of lodging, provided that the predominant portion of the living accommodations in the hotel, motel, etc., is used by transients during the taxable year. For purposes of the preceding sentence, the term “predominant portion” means “more than one-half”. Thus, if more than one-half of the living quarters of a hotel, motel, inn, or other similar establishment is used during the taxable year to accommodate tenants on a transient basis, none of the property used by such hotel, motel, etc., in the trade or business of furnishing lodging shall be considered as property which is used predominantly to furnish lodging or predominantly in connection with the furnishing of lodging. Accommodations shall be considered used on a transient basis if the rental period is normally less than 30 days.
(iii) Coin-operated machines. In the case of property which is described in section 50, coin-operated vending machines and coin-operated washing machines and dryers shall not be considered as property which is used predominantly to furnish lodging or predominantly in connection with the furnishing of lodging.
(iv) Certified historic structures. For purposes of this paragraph (h), regardless of the actual use of a certified historic structure, that portion of the basis of such certified historic structure which is attributable to qualified rehabilitation expenditures (as defined in § 1.48-12(c)) shall not be considered as property which is either used predominantly to furnish lodging or predominantly in connection with the furnishing of lodging. Accordingly, such portion of the basis may qualify as section 38 property. (For the definition of “certified historic structure,” see section 48(g)(3) and § 1.48-12(d).)
(i) [Reserved]
(j) Property used by certain tax-exempt organizations. The term “section 38 property” does not include property used by an organization (other than a cooperative described in section 521) which is exempt from the tax imposed by chapter 1 of the Code unless such property is used predominantly in an unrelated trade or business the income of which is subject to tax under section 511. If such property is debt-financed property as defined in section 514(b), the basis or cost of such property for purposes of computing qualified investment under section 46(c) shall include only that percentage of the basis or cost which is the same percentage as is used under section 514(a), for the year the property is placed in service, in computing the amount of gross income to be taken into account during such taxable year with respect to such property. The term “property used by an organization” means (1) property owned by the organization (whether or not leased to another person), and (2) property leased to the organization. Thus, for example, a data processing or copying machine which is leased to an organization exempt from tax would be considered as property used by such organization. Property (unless used predominantly in an unrelated trade or business) leased by another person to an organization exempt from tax or leased by such an organization to another person is not section 38 property to either the lessor or the lessee, and in either case the lessor may not elect under § 1.48-4 to treat the lessee of such property as having purchased such property for purposes of the credit allowed by section 38. This paragraph shall not apply to property leased on a casual or short-term basis to an organization exempt from tax.
(k) Property used by governmental units. The term “section 38 property” does not include property used by the United States, any State (including the District of Columbia) or political subdivision thereof, any international organization (as defined in section 7701(a)(18)) other than the International Telecommunications Satellite Consortium or any successor organization, or any agency or instrumentality of the United States, of any State or political subdivision thereof, or of any such international organization. The term “property used by the United States, etc.” means (1) property owned by any such governmental unit (whether or not leased to another person), and (2) property leased to any such governmental unit. Thus, for example, a data processing or copying machine which is leased to any such governmental unit would be considered as property used by such governmental unit. Property leased by another person to any such governmental unit or leased by such governmental unit to another person is not section 38 property to either the lessor or the lessee, and in either case the lessor may not elect under § 1.48-4 to treat the lessee of such property as having purchased such property for purposes of the credit allowed by section 38. This paragraph shall not apply to property leased on a casual or short-term basis to any such governmental unit.
(l) [Reserved]
(m) Elevators and escalators—
(1) In general. Under section 48(a)(1)(C), an elevator or escalator qualifies as section 38 property if—
(i) The construction, reconstruction, or erection of the elevator or escalator is completed by the taxpayer after June 30, 1963, or
(ii) The elevator or escalator is acquired after June 30, 1963, and the original use of such elevator or escalator commences with the taxpayer and commences after such date.
In the case of construction, reconstruction, or erection of an elevator or escalator commenced before January 1, 1962, and completed after June 30, 1963, there shall be taken into account in determining the qualified investment under section 46(c) only that portion of the basis which is properly attributable to construction, reconstruction, or erection after December 31, 1961. Further, if the construction, reconstruction, or erection of such property is commenced after December 31, 1961, and is completed after June 30, 1963, the entire basis of the elevator or escalator shall be taken into account in determining qualified investment under section 46(c). Also, if an elevator or escalator is reconstructed by the taxpayer after June 30, 1963, the basis attributable to such reconstruction may be taken into account in determining the qualified investment under section 46(c), irrespective of the fact that the original construction or erection of such elevator or escalator may have occurred before January 1, 1962. Paragraph (b) of § 1.48-2 shall be applied in determining the date of acquisition, original use, and basis attributable to construction, reconstruction, or erection.
(2) Definition of elevators and escalators. For purposes of this section the term “elevator” means a cage or platform and its hoisting machinery for conveying persons or freight to or from different levels and functionally related equipment which is essential to its operation. The term includes, for example, guide rails and cables, motors and controllers, control panels and landing buttons, and elevator gates and doors, which are essential to the operation of the elevator. The term “elevator” does not, however, include a structure which is considered a building for purposes of the investment credit. The term “escalator” means a moving staircase and functionally related equipment which is essential to its operation. For purposes of determining qualified investment under section 46(c) and § 1.46-3, the basis of an elevator or escalator does not include the cost of any structural alterations to the building, such as the cost of constructing a shaft or of making alterations to the floor, walls, or ceiling, even though such alterations may be necessary in order to install or modernize the elevator or escalator.
(3) Examples. The provisions of this paragraph may be illustrated by the following examples:
Example 1.
If an elevator with a total basis of $100,000 is completed after June 30, 1963, and the portion attributable to construction by the taxpayer after December 31, 1961, is determined by engineering estimates or by cost accounting records to be $30,000, only the $30,000 portion may be taken into account as an investment in new section 38 property in computing qualified investment.
Example 2.
If construction of an elevator with a total basis of $90,000 is commenced by the taxpayer after December 31, 1961, and is completed after June 30, 1963, the entire basis of $90,000 may be taken into account as an investment in new section 38 property.
Example 3.
The facts are the same as in example 2 except that construction of the elevator was completed before June 30, 1963. The elevator is not considered to be section 38 property.
Example 4.
In 1964, a taxpayer reconditions an elevator, which had been constructed and placed in service in 1962 and which had an adjusted basis in 1964 of $75,000. The cost of reconditioning amounts to an additional $50,000. The basis of the elevator which may be taken into account in computing qualified investment in section 38 property is $50,000, irrespective of whether the taxpayer contracts to have it reconditioned or reconditions it himself, and irrespective of whether the materials used in the process are new in use.
(n) Amortized property. Any property with respect to which an election under 167(k), 169, 184, 187, or 188 applies shall not be treated as section 38 property. In the case of any property to which section 169 applies, the preceding sentence shall apply only to so much of the adjusted basis of the property as (after the application of section 169(f)) constitutes the amortizable basis for purposes of section 169. This paragraph shall not apply to property with respect to which an election under section 167(k), 184, 187, or 188 applies unless such property is described in section 50.
(o) [Reserved]
(p) Qualified timber property.
(1) Qualified timber property (within the meaning of section 194(c)(1)) shall be treated as section 38 property to the extent of the portion of the basis of such property which is the amortizable basis (as defined in § 1.194-3(b)) acquired during the taxable year and taken into account under section 194 (after applying the limitation of section 194(b)(1)). Such amortizable basis shall qualify as section 38 property whether or not an election is made under section 194. However, any portion of such amortizable basis which is attributable to property which otherwise qualifies as section 38 property shall not be treated as section 38 property under section 48(a)(1)(F) and this paragraph. For example, amortizable basis attributable to depreciation on equipment would not qualify as section 38 property under this paragraph if such equipment qualifies as section 38 property under sections 48(a)(1) (A) or (B). In determining the portion of amortizable basis which qualifies as section 38 property under this paragraph, the reduction in amortizable basis to account for depreciation sustained with respect to property used in the reforestation process (which otherwise qualifies as section 38 property) shall be applied before the $10,000 limitation on eligible costs under section 194(b)(1). For example, if in a taxable year a taxpayer incurs qualifying reforestation costs resulting in $12,000 of amortizable basis with respect to property for which an election is in effect, and $2,000 of these costs are attributable to depreciation of the taxpayer's equipment, such $12,000 would first be reduced by the $2,000 of depreciation, and the $10,000 limitation under section 194(b)(1) would be applied following such reduction.
(2) If a taxpayer makes an election to amortize reforestation expenditures under section 194, and allocates the $10,000 limitation among more than one property under § 1.194-2(b)(2), then such allocation shall apply for purposes of determining the amortizable basis that qualifies as section 38 property under paragraph (p)(1) of this section. If no election is made under section 194, the taxpayer may select the manner in which the $10,000 limitation is to be allocated among the qualified timber properties.
(Sec. 38(b), 76 Stat. 963; 26 U.S.C. 38; secs. 194 (94 Stat. 1989; 26 U.S.C. 194) and 7805 (68A Stat. 917, 26 U.S.C. 7805) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954)
[T.D. 6731, 29 FR 6073, May 8, 1964]
Editorial Note:
For Federal Register citations affecting § 1.48-1, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.fdsys.gov.

Title 26 published on 2014-04-01

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  • 2014-08-06; vol. 79 # 151 - Wednesday, August 6, 2014
    1. 79 FR 45682 - Longevity Annuity Contracts; Correction
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY, Internal Revenue Service
      Correcting amendment.
      This correction is effective August 6, 2014 and applicable beginning July 2, 2014.
      26 CFR Part 1

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Reorganization ... 1978 Plan No. 4

Title 26 published on 2014-04-01

The following are ALL rules, proposed rules, and notices (chronologically) published in the Federal Register relating to 26 CFR 1 after this date.

  • 2014-08-06; vol. 79 # 151 - Wednesday, August 6, 2014
    1. 79 FR 45682 - Longevity Annuity Contracts; Correction
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY, Internal Revenue Service
      Correcting amendment.
      This correction is effective August 6, 2014 and applicable beginning July 2, 2014.
      26 CFR Part 1