26 CFR 25.7520-3T - Limitation on the application of section 7520 (temporary).

§ 25.7520-3T Limitation on the application of section 7520 (temporary).
(a) through (b)(2)(iv) [Reserved] For further guidance, see § 25.7520-3(a) through (b)(2)(iv).
(b)
(2)
(v) Examples 1 through 4. [Reserved] For further guidance, see § 25.7520-3(b)(2)(v) Examples 1 through 4.
Example 5.
Eroding corpus in an annuity trust. (i) The donor, who is age 60 and in normal health, transfers property worth $1,000,000 to a trust on or after May 1, 2009. The trust will pay a 10 percent ($100,000 per year) annuity to a charitable organization for the life of the donor, payable annually at the end of each period, and the remainder then will be distributed to the donor's child. The section 7520 rate for the month of the transfer is 6.8 percent. First, it is necessary to determine whether the annuity may exhaust the corpus before all annuity payments are made. Because it is assumed that any measuring life may survive until age 110, any life annuity could require payments until the measuring life reaches age 110. Based on a section 7520 interest rate of 6.8 percent, the determination of whether the annuity may exhaust the corpus before the annuity payments are made is computed as follows:
Age to which life annuity may continue 110
Less: Age of measuring life at date of transfer 60
Number of years annuity may continue 50
Annual annuity payment $100,000.00
Times: Annuity factor for 50 years derived from Table B (1—.037277/.068) 14.1577
Present value of term certain annuity $1,415,770.00
(ii) Because the present value of an annuity for a term of 50 years exceeds the corpus, the annuity may exhaust the trust before all payments are made. Consequently, the annuity must be valued as an annuity payable for a term of years or until the prior death of the annuitant, with the term of years determined by when the fund will be exhausted by the annuity payments.
(iii) The annuity factor for a term of years at 6.8 percent is derived by subtracting the applicable remainder factor in Table B (see § 20.2031-7(d)(6)) from 1.000000 and then dividing the result by .068. An annuity of $100,000 payable at the end of each year for a period that has an annuity factor of 10.0 would have a present value exactly equal to the principal available to pay the annuity over the term. The annuity factor for 17 years is 9.8999 and the annuity factor for 18 years is 10.2059. Thus, it is determined that the $1,000,000 initial transfer will be sufficient to make 17 annual payments of $100,000, but not to make the entire 18th payment. The present value of an annuity of $100,000 payable at the end of each year for 17 years certain is $100,000 times 9.8999 or $989,990. The remaining amount is $10,010.00. Of the initial corpus amount, $10,010.00 is not needed to make payments for 17 years, so this amount, as accumulated for 18 years, will be available for the final payment. The 18-year accumulation factor is (1 0.068) 18 or 3.268004. Then the amount available in 18 years is $10,010.00 times 3.268004 or $32,712.72. Therefore, for purposes of analysis we consider the annuity payments as being composed of two distinct annuity components. The two annuity components taken together must equal the total annual amount of $100,000. The first annuity is the exact amount that the trust will have available for the final payment, $32,712.72. The second annuity component then must be $100,000 minus $32,712.72, or $67,287.28. Specifically, the initial corpus will be able to make payments of $67,287.28 per year for 17 years plus payments of $32,712.72 per year for 18 years. The total annuity is valued by adding the value of the two separate temporary component annuities.
(iv) Based on Table H of Publication 1457, Actuarial Valuations Version 3A, which may be obtained from the IRS Internet site, the present value of an annuity of $67,287.28 per year payable for 17 years or until the prior death of a person aged 60 is $597,013.12 ($67,287.28 × 8.8726). The present value of an annuity of $32,712.72 per year payable for 18 years or until the prior death of a person aged 60 is $296,887.56 ($32,712.72 × 9.0756). Thus, the present value of the charitable annuity interest is $893,900.68 ($597,013.12 $296,887.56).
(3) [Reserved] For further guidance, see § 25.7520-3(b)(3).
(4) Example. The provisions of paragraph (b)(3) of this section are illustrated by the following example:
Example.
Terminal illness. The donor transfers property worth $1,000,000 to a child on or after May 1, 2009, in exchange for the child's promise to pay the donor $80,000 per year for the donor's life, payable annually at the end of each period. The donor is age 75 but has been diagnosed with an incurable illness and has at least a 50 percent probability of dying within 1 year. The section 7520 interest rate for the month of the transfer is 7.6 percent, and the standard annuity factor at that interest rate for a person age 75 in normal health is 6.6493 (1−.49465/.076). Thus, if the donor were not terminally ill, the present value of the annuity would be $531,944.00 ($80,000 × 6.6493). Assuming the presumption provided in paragraph (b)(3) of this section does not apply, because there is at least a 50 percent probability that the donor will die within 1 year, the standard section 7520 annuity factor may not be used to determine the present value of the donor's annuity interest. Instead, a special section 7520 annuity factor must be computed that takes into account the projection of the donor's actual life expectancy.
(5) [Reserved] For further guidance, see § 25.7520-3(b)(5).
(c) Effective/applicability dates. Section 25.7520-3(a) is effective as of May 1, 1989. The provisions of paragraph (b) of this section, except Example 5 in paragraph (b)(2)(v) and paragraph (b)(4), are effective with respect to gifts made after December 13, 1995. Example 5 in paragraph (b)(2)(v) and paragraph (b)(4) are effective with respect to gifts made on or after May 1, 2009.
[T.D. 9448, 74 FR 21517, May 7, 2009]

Title 26 published on 2014-04-01

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