26 CFR 31.3221-3 - Supplemental tax.

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§ 31.3221-3 Supplemental tax.
(a) Introduction—
(1) In general. Section 3221(c) imposes an excise tax on every employer, as defined in section 3231(a) and § 31.3231(a)-1, with respect to individuals employed by the employer. The tax is imposed for each work-hour for which the employer pays compensation, as defined in section 3231(e) and § 31.3231(e)-1, for services rendered to the employer during a calendar quarter. This § 31.3221-3 provides rules for determining the number of taxable work-hours.
(2) Overview. Paragraph (b) of this section defines work-hours. Paragraph (c) of this section demonstrates the calculation of work-hours. Paragraph (d) of this section offers a safe harbor calculation of work-hours for use by any employer in lieu of calculating the number of work-hours for each employee.
(b) Definition of work-hours—
(1) In general. For purposes of section 3221(c) and this section, work-hours are hours for which the employee is compensated, whether or not the employee performs services.
(i) Payments included in work-hours. Work-hours include regular time worked; overtime; time paid for vacations and holidays; time allowed for meals; away-from-home terminal time; called and not used, runaround, and deadheading time; time for attending court, participating in investigations, and attending claim and safety meetings; and guaranteed time not worked. Work-hours also include conversion hours, that is, compensation converted into work-hours. Conversion hours may be derived from payment by the mile or by the piece. Work-hours also include time for which the employee is paid for periods of absence not due to sickness or accident disability, such as for routine medical and dental examinations or for time lost.
(ii) Payments excluded from work-hours. Certain kinds of payments are not subject to conversion into work-hours. These include those payments that are specifically excluded from compensation within the meaning of section 3231(e), such as certain sick pay payments (section 3231(e)(1)(i)); tips (section 3231(e)(1)(ii)); and amounts paid specifically (either as an advance, as reimbursement, or allowance) for traveling expenses (section 3231(e)(1)(iii)). Traveling expenses paid under a nonaccountable plan are excluded from work-hours even though they are includible in compensation. See § 31.3231(e)-1(a)(5). Also excluded from work-hours are amounts representing bonuses, amounts received pursuant to the exercise of an employee stock option, and all separation payments or severance allowances.
(2) Hourly compensation. Because the tax under section 3221(c) is calculated on the basis of work-hours, the number of hours for which an employee receives compensation is the figure used to determine work-hours. In the case of an hourly-rated employee, each hour for which the employee receives compensation is one work-hour.
(3) Daily, weekly, monthly compensation.
(i) If an employee is paid by the day, week, month, or other period of time, the tax is imposed on the number of hours comprehended in the rate and, if any, the number of overtime hours for which additional compensation is paid. Thus, in the case of an office worker who receives an annual salary based on an 8-hour, 5-day-a-week work schedule that includes paid holidays, vacations, and sick time, the number of work-hours for one month is 174 (2088 hours/year ÷12 months).
(ii) The rule in paragraph (b)(3)(i) of this section is illustrated by the following examples.
Example 1 A,
an office worker, receives an annual salary that is paid monthly. The salary is based on an 8-hour, Monday through Friday work schedule. A is not paid for overtime hours. A is not expected to work on holidays, during A's annual vacation, or during periods that A is ill. The number of work-hours for one month is 174 (2088 hours/year ÷12 months). This figure remains constant, even though some months have more workdays than others.
Example 2 B
is paid a stated amount for each day B works, regardless of the number of hours worked. However, if B works more than 8 hours during any day, B is paid overtime for each additional hour worked that day. B is not paid for holidays, vacations, or sick time. During May, B worked 6 hours on 4 days, 7 hours on 6 days, 8 hours on 6 days, and 9 hours on 5 days. Because B is paid a daily rate for up to 8 hours, 8 hours are comprehended in the daily rate. Therefore, the number of work-hours for May is 173 (21 days×8 hours/day 5 overtime hours), even though B actually worked 159 hours.
(4) Conversion hours—
(i) Compensation not based on time (hour, day, month, etc.), such as compensation paid by the mile or by the piece, must be converted into the number of hours represented by the compensation paid. Thus, if an employee is paid by the mile, 1 work-hour equals the number of miles constituting a workday, divided by 8 hours. However, in the case of a collective bargaining agreement that specifies a number of hours as constituting a workday, the number of hours specified under the agreement may be used instead of 8.
(ii) The rule in paragraph (b)(4)(i) of this section is illustrated by the following example.
Example.
C's normal workday consists of 2 150-mile round trips that together take 6 hours. C is paid by the mile. The collective bargaining agreement does not specify the number of hours in a workday. Thus, the number of work-hours for each day C works is 8, or 1 work-hour for each 37.5 miles (300 miles/day ÷ 8 hours/day). If the applicable collective bargaining agreement specifies that 6 hours constitute a workday, the number of work-hours for each day C works would be 6.
(c) Calculation of work-hours—
(1) An employer may calculate the work-hours separately for each employee, as described in the examples in this paragraph. If the employer chooses to calculate work-hours separately for each employee, the employer must calculate the number of regular hours, overtime hours, and conversion hours for each employee for each month. In lieu of separate calculations, the employer may calculate the work-hours for all the employer's employees using the safe harbor formula described in paragraph (d) of this section.
(2) The rules in paragraph (c) of this section are illustrated by the following examples.
Example 1.
D worked 8 hours a day, Monday through Friday, during the months of February and March 1992. D did not work on President's Day, but was paid for the holiday. D's work-hours for February were 160 (19 days × 8 hours a day 8 holiday hours). D's work-hours for March were 176 (22 days × 8 hours a day).
Example 2.
E worked 7-hour shifts every Tuesday through Saturday during the months of February and March 1992. E also worked 7 overtime hours during February and 21 overtime hours during March. Also, E was paid for 7 hours on President's Day, even though E did not work on that day. The number of work-hours for February was 161 (21 days × 7 hours a day 7 overtime hours 7 holiday hours). The number of work-hours for March was 168 (21 days × 7 hours a day 21 overtime hours). Because E receives an hourly wage and was paid for the President's Day holiday, the number of hours (7) for which E was paid are added to the hours E actually worked. If E had worked on President's Day and had received extra pay for working on a holiday and holiday pay for 7 hours, the employer would include 14 hours in E's work-hours for that day, the 7 hours E actually worked and the 7 holiday hours for which E was paid.
Example 3.
Employment beginning during month. F began employment on March 16, a Monday, and worked 8 hours a day, Monday through Friday. The employer calculates that F's hours for the month were 96, because F worked 12 8-hour days during the month. If March 16 were on a Friday, the employer would calculate 11 days, or 88 hours.
Example 4.
Employment ending during month. G's last day of employment was Friday, March 13. G worked 8 hours a day, Monday through Friday, except for March 3, when G was ill. G was paid for 8 hours for March 3. The employer calculates that G's work-hours for March were 80, because G worked 9 8-hour days and was paid for an additional 8 hours.
(d) Safe harbor—
(1) In general. In lieu of calculating work-hours separately for each employee, an employer may use the safe harbor for all employees. If the employer elects to use the safe harbor for a calendar year, the employer must use the safe harbor for all employees for the entire calendar year. If an employer uses the safe harbor for a calendar year, the employer need not elect the safe harbor for the following calendar year. An employer that elects the safe harbor for a calendar year may not subsequently elect to separately calculate employee work-hours for that calendar year.
(2) Method of calculation. The safe harbor treats each employee of the employer as receiving monthly compensation for a number of hours equal to the safe harbor number. To determine the number of work-hours for a month, the employer multiplies the safe harbor number by the number that equals the total number of employees to whom the employer paid compensation during the month.
(i) Safe harbor number defined. The safe harbor number is the number established in guidance of general applicability promulgated by the Commissioner.
(ii) Employee defined. Solely for purposes of this paragraph, an employee is any individual who is paid compensation, within the meaning of § 31.3231(e)-1, regardless of the amount, during the month. Thus, for example, a part-time, temporary, or seasonal employee is counted as an employee. A terminated employee is counted in the month of termination (provided the terminated employee received compensation in the month of termination), but not in any subsequent month in which the employee does not perform service for the employer as an employee, even if the terminated employee is paid compensation in a subsequent month. Thus, for example, an employee who terminates employment during the month, receives compensation during the month of termination, and receives a final paycheck the following month is counted as an employee of the employer for the month of termination but not for the following month.
(3) Method of election. An employer makes the safe harbor election for a calendar year on the employment tax return filed for the previous calendar year.
(4) Additional rules. The Commissioner may, in revenue procedures, revenue rulings, notices, or other guidance of general applicability, revise the safe harbor number or provide additional safe harbors that satisfy section 3221(c).
(e) Effective dates. This § 31.3221-3 is effective for calendar years beginning after December 31, 1992, except that paragraph (d) is effective for calendar years beginning after December 31, 1993. Taxpayers may apply the rules in paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) of this section before January 1, 1993.
[T.D. 8525, 59 FR 9666, Mar. 1, 1994]

Title 26 published on 2013-04-01

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  • 2014-10-27; vol. 79 # 207 - Monday, October 27, 2014
    1. 79 FR 63811 - Removal of the Qualified Payment Card Agent Program
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      DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY, Internal Revenue Service
      Final regulations.
      These regulations are effective October 27, 2014.
      26 CFR Parts 31 and 301

Title 26 published on 2013-04-01

The following are ALL rules, proposed rules, and notices (chronologically) published in the Federal Register relating to 26 CFR 31 after this date.

  • 2014-10-27; vol. 79 # 207 - Monday, October 27, 2014
    1. 79 FR 63811 - Removal of the Qualified Payment Card Agent Program
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY, Internal Revenue Service
      Final regulations.
      These regulations are effective October 27, 2014.
      26 CFR Parts 31 and 301