26 CFR 41.4483-2 - Exemption for certain transit-type buses.

§ 41.4483-2 Exemption for certain transit-type buses.
(a) In general. Use in any taxable period, or part thereof, of any bus of the transit type by any person who is engaged in the operation of a transit system is exempt from the tax, if such person meets the 60-percent passenger fare revenue test provided for in paragraph (e) of this section, for the applicable period prescribed in paragraph (c) of this section as the test period for such person for such system for such taxable period, or part thereof.
(b) Buses of the transit type. The term “transit type”, when used in the regulations in this part with reference to a bus, means the type of bus which is designed for the mass transportation of persons within an urban area, as distinguished from the intercity-type bus. A transit-type bus is ordinarily distinguishable from an intercity-type bus by comparison of seats, doors, and baggage facilities. The transit-type bus usually has straight-back seats of the bench type, while the intercity-type bus generally has seats which either can be reclined or are in fact permanently fixed in a reclining position. The transit-type bus is more likely to have an accordion or folding-type door at the front of the bus, and often has a second door in the middle or at the rear for passengers to leave the bus, as opposed to the emergency-type rear door which may or may not be included in the intercity-type bus. The typical transit-type bus does not have facilities for storing baggage whereas the typical intercity-type bus has facilities for storing baggage in a compartment underneath the floor of the bus or in overhead racks, or both. Other characteristics which may be taken into account in distinguishing a transit-type bus from an intercity-type bus include gear ratios, acceleration and maximum speed, and aisle space for standees. The transit-type bus ordinarily has a lower gear ratio to provide for quick starts and because, in general, buses of this type are operated at low speeds. The intercity-type bus ordinarily has a higher gear ratio and can be operated at much higher speeds. The transit-type bus usually has wider aisles, with overhead straps or bars to accommodate standees.
(c) Test period.
(1) In the case of any person who is engaged in the operation of a transit system at any time in the calendar quarter immediately preceding July 1 of any taxable period, the test period for such system for such taxable period shall be such calendar quarter. However, if passenger fare revenue from scheduled service described in paragraph (e) of this section was derived on less than 30 days during such calendar quarter from operation of such system, the test period for such system for such taxable period shall be the last preceding test period for such system. If such system has no preceding test period, then the test period for such system for such taxable period shall be the calendar quarter beginning with July 1 of such taxable period.
(2) Except as otherwise provided in subparagraph (3) of this paragraph, in the case of any person who commences operation of a transit system at any time on or after July 1 of any taxable period the test period for such system for that part of such taxable period beginning with the first day on which such operation was commenced shall be the calendar quarter in which falls such first day. However, if passenger fare revenue from scheduled service described in paragraph (e) of this section was derived on less than 30 days during such calendar quarter from operation of such system, the test period for such system for such taxable period shall be the following calendar quarter.
(3) In the case of any person who commences operation of a transit system at any time in the last calendar quarter to which the tax imposed by section 4481 applies, such last calendar quarter shall be the test period for such transit system regardless of the number of days in which passenger fare revenue is derived in such calendar quarter.
(d) Transit system. The term “transit system”, as used in the regulations in this part, means any system for furnishing scheduled common carrier public passenger land transportation service along regular routes.
(e) 60-percent passenger fare revenue test. For purposes of this section, a person engaged in the operation of a transit system meets the 60-percent passenger fare revenue test, for the applicable test period prescribed in this section, if:
(1) During such test period such person derived passenger fare revenue from the operation of such system, and
(2) At least 60 percent of the total of such passenger fare revenue derived by such person during such test period was attributable to (i) amounts paid for transportation which do not exceed 60 cents, (ii) amounts paid for commutation or season tickets for single trips of less than 30 miles, or (iii) amounts paid for commutation tickets for one month or less. In determining the total of such passenger fare revenue, revenue from sources such as charter fees, rentals of property, advertising receipts, etc., is not taken into account.
(f) Examples. Application of this section may be illustrated by the following examples:
Example (1).
The X Transit Company is engaged in the operation of a transit system in the city of A and surrounding area throughout April, May, and June of 1984 and the taxable period beginning July 1, 1984. It derives passenger fare revenue from the operation of such system for 15 days in April and for the entire months of May and June of 1984. On July 1, 1984, the Company is using 60 buses of the transit type and 40 buses of the intercity type. Each of 20 of the transit-type buses and each of 10 of the intercity-type buses has a taxable gross weight of less than 55,000 pounds. (No tax is imposed on the use of either a transit-type bus or an intercity-type bus having a taxable gross weight of less than 55,000 pounds. See § 41.4481-1.) Use of the 10 intercity-type buses is subject to the tax for the taxable period beginning with July 1, 1984, since the exemption, if any, applies only to transit-type buses. Use of the 20 transit-type buses is not subject to the tax for such taxable period if at least 60 percent of the total passenger fare revenue derived by the X Transit Company during April, May, and June of 1984 (the test period prescribed in paragraph (c) (1) of this section) from operation of such system was from fares attributable to (i) amounts paid for transportation which do not exceed 60 cents, (ii) amounts paid for commutation or season tickets for single trips of less than 30 miles, or (iii) amounts paid for commutation tickets for one month or less. If the X Transit Company does not meet the 60-percent passenger fare revenue test for April, May, and June of 1984, the tax attaches for the taxable period beginning with July 1, 1984, with respect to the use of each of the 20 transit-type buses having a taxable gross weight of more than less than 55,000 pounds.
Example (2).
Assume the same facts as those stated in Example (1), except that the X Transit Company commences operation of the transit system on July 15, 1984, and derives passenger fare revenue from operation of the system throughout the following August and September. In such case, the test period is July, August, and September of 1984, and if the test is met for this period, no tax is imposed on the use by the Company of any bus of the transit type in the period July 15, 1984, through June 30, 1985.
Example (3).
Assume the same facts as those stated in Example (1), except that the X Transit Company commences operation of the transit system on April 15, 1985, and derives passenger fare revenue from operation of the system throughout the following May and June. In such case the test period is April, May, and June of 1985, and if the test is met for this period, no tax is imposed on the use by the Company of any bus of the transit type in the period April 15 through June of 1985, or in the taxable period beginning on July 1, 1985.
[T.D. 6216, 21 FR 9645, Dec. 6, 1956, as amended by T.D. 6743, 29 FR 7931, June 23, 1964; T.D. 8027, 50 FR 21248, May 23, 1985; T.D. 8879, 65 FR 17154, Mar. 31, 2000]

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