29 CFR 1982.102 - Obligations and prohibited acts.

§ 1982.102 Obligations and prohibited acts.
(a) National Transit Systems Security Act.
(1) A public transportation agency, contractor, or subcontractor of such agency, or officer or employee of such agency shall not discharge, demote, suspend, reprimand, or in any other way discriminate against, including but not limited to intimidating, threatening, restraining, coercing, blacklisting, or disciplining an employee if such discrimination is due, in whole or in part, to the employee's lawful, good faith act done, or perceived by the employer to have been done or about to be done—
(i) To provide information, directly cause information to be provided, or otherwise directly assist in any investigation regarding any conduct which the employee reasonably believes constitutes a violation of any Federal law, rule, or regulation relating to public transportation safety or security, or fraud, waste, or abuse of Federal grants or other public funds intended to be used for public transportation safety or security, if the information or assistance is provided to, or an investigation stemming from the provided information is conducted by—
(A) A Federal, State or local regulatory or law enforcement agency (including an office of the Inspector General under the Inspector General Act of 1978 (5 U.S.C. App.; Pub. L. 95-452));
(B) Any Member of Congress, any Committee of Congress, or the Government Accountability Office; or
(C) A person with supervisory authority over the employee or such other person who has the authority to investigate, discover, or terminate the misconduct;
(ii) To refuse to violate or assist in the violation of any Federal law, rule, or regulation relating to public transportation safety or security;
(iii) To file a complaint or directly cause to be brought a proceeding related to the enforcement of this section or to testify in that proceeding;
(iv) To cooperate with a safety or security investigation by the Secretary of Transportation, the Secretary of Homeland Security, or the National Transportation Safety Board; or
(v) To furnish information to the Secretary of Transportation, the Secretary of Homeland Security, the National Transportation Safety Board, or any Federal, State, or local regulatory or law enforcement agency as to the facts relating to any accident or incident resulting in injury or death to an individual or damage to property occurring in connection with public transportation.
(2)
(i) A public transportation agency, contractor, or subcontractor of such agency, or officer or employee of such agency shall not discharge, demote, suspend, reprimand, or in any other way discriminate against, including but not limited to intimidating, threatening, restraining, coercing, blacklisting, or disciplining an employee for—
(A) Reporting a hazardous safety or security condition;
(B) Refusing to work when confronted by a hazardous safety or security condition related to the performance of the employee's duties, if the conditions described in paragraph (a)(2)(ii) of this section exist; or
(C) Refusing to authorize the use of any safety- or security-related equipment, track, or structures, if the employee is responsible for the inspection or repair of the equipment, track, or structures, when the employee believes that the equipment, track, or structures are in a hazardous safety or security condition, if the conditions described in paragraph (a)(2)(ii) of this section exist.
(ii) A refusal is protected under paragraph (a)(2)(i)(B) and (C) of this section if—
(A) The refusal is made in good faith and no reasonable alternative to the refusal is available to the employee;
(B) A reasonable individual in the circumstances then confronting the employee would conclude that—
(1) The hazardous condition presents an imminent danger of death or serious injury; and
(2) The urgency of the situation does not allow sufficient time to eliminate the danger without such refusal; and
(C) The employee, where possible, has notified the public transportation agency of the existence of the hazardous condition and the intention not to perform further work, or not to authorize the use of the hazardous equipment, track, or structures, unless the condition is corrected immediately or the equipment, track, or structures are repaired properly or replaced.
(iii) In paragraph (a)(2)(ii) of this section, only paragraph (a)(2)(ii)(A) shall apply to security personnel, including transit police, employed or utilized by a public transportation agency to protect riders, equipment, assets, or facilities.
(b) Federal Railroad Safety Act.
(1) A railroad carrier engaged in interstate or foreign commerce, a contractor or a subcontractor of such a railroad carrier, or an officer or employee of such a railroad carrier, may not discharge, demote, suspend, reprimand, or in any other way discriminate against, including but not limited to intimidating, threatening, restraining, coercing, blacklisting, or disciplining an employee if such discrimination is due, in whole or in part, to the employee's lawful, good faith act done, or perceived by the employer to have been done or about to be done—
(i) To provide information, directly cause information to be provided, or otherwise directly assist in any investigation regarding any conduct which the employee reasonably believes constitutes a violation of any Federal law, rule, or regulation relating to railroad safety or security, or gross fraud, waste, or abuse of Federal grants or other public funds intended to be used for railroad safety or security, if the information or assistance is provided to or an investigation stemming from the provided information is conducted by—
(A) A Federal, State, or local regulatory or law enforcement agency (including an office of the Inspector General under the Inspector General Act of 1978 (5 U.S.C. App.; Pub. L. 95-452));
(B) Any Member of Congress, any committee of Congress, or the Government Accountability Office; or
(C) A person with supervisory authority over the employee or such other person who has the authority to investigate, discover, or terminate the misconduct;
(ii) To refuse to violate or assist in the violation of any Federal law, rule, or regulation relating to railroad safety or security;
(iii) To file a complaint, or directly cause to be brought a proceeding related to the enforcement of 49 U.S.C. part A of subtitle V or, as applicable to railroad safety or security, 49 U.S.C. chapter 51 or 57, or to testify in that proceeding;
(iv) To notify, or attempt to notify, the railroad carrier or the Secretary of Transportation of a work-related personal injury or work-related illness of an employee;
(v) To cooperate with a safety or security investigation by the Secretary of Transportation, the Secretary of Homeland Security, or the National Transportation Safety Board;
(vi) To furnish information to the Secretary of Transportation, the Secretary of Homeland Security, the National Transportation Safety Board, or any Federal, State, or local regulatory or law enforcement agency as to the facts relating to any accident or incident resulting in injury or death to an individual or damage to property occurring in connection with railroad transportation; or
(vii) To accurately report hours on duty pursuant to 49 U.S.C. chapter 211.
(2)
(i) A railroad carrier engaged in interstate or foreign commerce, or an officer or employee of such a railroad carrier, shall not discharge, demote, suspend, reprimand, or in any other way discriminate against, including but not limited to intimidating, threatening, restraining, coercing, blacklisting, or disciplining an employee for—
(A) Reporting, in good faith, a hazardous safety or security condition;
(B) Refusing to work when confronted by a hazardous safety or security condition related to the performance of the employee's duties, if the conditions described in paragraph (b)(2)(ii) of this section exist; or
(C) Refusing to authorize the use of any safety-related equipment, track, or structures, if the employee is responsible for the inspection or repair of the equipment, track, or structures, when the employee believes that the equipment, track, or structures are in a hazardous safety or security condition, if the conditions described in paragraph (b)(2)(ii) of this section exist.
(ii) A refusal is protected under paragraphs (b)(2)(i)(B) and (C) of this section if—
(A) The refusal is made in good faith and no reasonable alternative to the refusal is available to the employee;
(B) A reasonable individual in the circumstances then confronting the employee would conclude that—
(1) The hazardous condition presents an imminent danger of death or serious injury; and
(2) The urgency of the situation does not allow sufficient time to eliminate the danger without such refusal; and
(C) The employee, where possible, has notified the railroad carrier of the existence of the hazardous condition and the intention not to perform further work, or not to authorize the use of the hazardous equipment, track, or structures, unless the condition is corrected immediately or the equipment, track, or structures are repaired properly or replaced.
(iii) In paragraph (b)(2)(ii) of this section, only paragraph (b)(2)(ii)(A) shall apply to security personnel employed by a railroad carrier to protect individuals and property transported by railroad.
(3) A railroad carrier engaged in interstate or foreign commerce, a contractor or a subcontractor of such a railroad carrier, or an officer or employee of such a railroad carrier may not discipline, or threaten discipline to, an employee for requesting medical or first aid treatment, or for following orders or a treatment plan of a treating physician, except that—
(i) A railroad carrier's refusal to permit an employee to return to work following medical treatment shall not be considered a violation of FRSA if the refusal is pursuant to Federal Railroad Administration medical standards for fitness of duty or, if there are no pertinent Federal Railroad Administration standards, a carrier's medical standards for fitness for duty.
(ii) For purposes of this paragraph, the term “discipline” means to bring charges against a person in a disciplinary proceeding, suspend, terminate, place on probation, or make note of reprimand on an employee's record.

Title 29 published on 2013-07-01

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United States Code
U.S. Code: Title 6 - DOMESTIC SECURITY
U.S. Code: Title 49 - TRANSPORTATION