32 CFR 321.13 - Exemptions.

§ 321.13 Exemptions.
(a) General. The Director of the Defense Security Service establishes the following exemptions of records systems (or portions thereof) from the provisions of these rules, and other indicated portions of Pub. L. 93-579, in this section. They may be exercised only by the Director, Defense Security Service and the Chief of the Office of FOI and Privacy. Exemptions will be exercised only when necessary for a specific, significant and legitimate reason connected with the purpose of a records system, and not simply because they are authorized by statute. Personal records releasable under the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 552 will not be withheld from subject individuals based on these exemptions.
(b) All systems of records maintained by DSS shall be exempt from the requirements of 5 U.S.C. 552a(d) pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(1) to the extent that the system contains any information properly classified under Executive Order 12958 and which is required by the Executive Order to be withheld in the interest of national defense of foreign policy. This exemption, which may be applicable to parts of all systems of records, is necessary because certain record systems not otherwise specifically designated for exemptions herein may contain items of information that have been properly classified.
(c) System identifier: V1-01.
(1) System name: Privacy and Freedom of Information Request Records.
(2) Exemptions: (i) Investigatory material compiled for law enforcement purposes may be exempt pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2). However, if an individual is denied any right, privilege, or benefit for which he would otherwise be entitled by Federal law or for which he would otherwise be eligible, as a result of the maintenance of such information, the individual will be provided access to such information except to the extent that disclosure would reveal the identity of a confidential source.
(ii) Records maintained in connection with providing protective services to the President and other individuals under 18 U.S.C. 3506, may be exempt pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(3).
(iii) Investigatory material compiled solely for the purpose of determining suitability, eligibility, or qualifications for federal civilian employment, military service, federal contracts, or access to classified information may be exempt pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(5), but only to the extent that such material would reveal the identity of a confidential source.
(iv) Any portion of this system that falls under the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2), (k)(3), (k)(5) may be exempt from the following subsections of 5 U.S.C. 552a(c)(3); (d); (e)(1); (e)(4)(G), (H) and (I); and (f).
(3) Authority: 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2), (k)(3), (k)(5).
(4) Reasons: (i) From subsection (c)(3) because it will enable DSS to conduct certain investigations and relay law enforcement information without compromise of the information, protection of investigative techniques and efforts employed, and identities of confidential sources who might not otherwise come forward and who furnished information under an express promise that the sources' identity would be held in confidence (or prior to the effective date of the Act, under an implied promise);
(ii) From subsections (e)(1), (e)(4)(G), (H), and (I) because it will provide protection against notification of investigatory material including certain reciprocal investigations and counterintelligence information, which might alert a subject to the fact that an investigation of that individual is taking place, and the disclosure of which would weaken the on-going investigation, reveal investigatory techniques, and place confidential informants in jeopardy who furnished information under an express promise that the sources' identity would be held in confidence (or prior to the effective date of the Act, under an implied promise);
(iii) From subsections (d) and (f) because requiring DSS to grant access to records and agency rules for access and amendment of records would unfairly impede the agency's investigation of allegations of unlawful activities. To require DSS to confirm or deny the existence of a record pertaining to a requesting individual may in itself provide an answer to that individual relating to an on-going investigation. The investigation of possible unlawful activities would be jeopardized by agency rules requiring verification of record, disclosure of the record to the subject, and record amendment procedures.
(d) System identifier: V5-01.
(1) System name: Investigative Files System
(2) Exemption: (i) Investigatory material compiled for law enforcement purposes may be exempt pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2). However, if an individual is denied any right, privilege, or benefit for which he would otherwise be entitled by Federal law or for which he would otherwise be eligible, as a result of the maintenance of such information, the individual will be provided access to such information except to the extent that disclosure would reveal the identity of a confidential source.
(ii) Records maintained in connection with providing protective services to the President and other individuals under 18 U.S.C. 3506, may be exempt pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(3).
(iii) Investigatory material compiled solely for the purpose of determining suitability, eligibility, or qualifications for federal civilian employment, military service, federal contracts, or access to classified information may be exempt pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(5), but only to the extent that such material would reveal the identity of a confidential source.
(iv) Any portion of this system that falls under the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2), (k)(3), or (k)(5) may be exempt from the following subsections of 5 U.S.C. 552a(c)(3); (d); (e)(1); (e)(4)(G), (H), and (I); and (f).
(3) Authority: 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2), (k)(3), or (k)(5).
(4) Reasons: (i) From subsection (c)(3) because it will enable DSS to conduct certain investigations and relay law enforcement information without compromise of the information, protection of investigative techniques and efforts employed, and identities of confidential sources who might not otherwise come forward and who furnished information under an express promise that the sources' identity would be held in confidence (or prior to the effective date of the Act, under an implied promise).
(ii) From subsections (e)(1), (e)(4)(G), (H), and (I) because it will provide protection against notification of investigatory material including certain reciprocal investigations and counterintelligence information, which might alert a subject to the fact that an investigation of that individual is taking place, and the disclosure of which would weaken the on-going investigation, reveal investigatory techniques, and place confidential informants in jeopardy who furnished information under an express promise that the sources' identity would be held in confidence (or prior to the effective date of the Act, under an implied promise).
(iii) From subsections (d) and (f) because requiring DSS to grant access to records and agency rules for access and amendment of records would unfairly impede the agency's investigation of allegations of unlawful activities. To require DSS to confirm or deny the existence of a record pertaining to a requesting individual may in itself provide an answer to that individual relating to an on-going investigation. The investigation of possible unlawful activities would be jeopardized by agency rules requiring verification of record, disclosure of the record to the subject, and record amendment procedures.
(e) System identifier: V5-02.
(1) System name: Defense Clearance and Investigations Index (DCII).
(2) Exemption: Investigatory material compiled for law enforcement purposes may be exempt pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2). However, if an individual is denied any right, privilege, or benefit for which he would otherwise be entitled by Federal law or for which he would otherwise be eligible, as a result of the maintenance of such information, the individual will be provided access to such information except to the extent that disclosure would reveal the identity of a confidential source. Any portion of this system that falls under the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2) may be exempt from the following subsections of 5 U.S.C. 552a(c)(3); (d); (e)(1); (e)(4)(G), (H), and (I), and (f).
(3) Authority: 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2).
(4) Reasons: (i) From subsection (c)(3) because it will enable DSS to conduct certain investigations and relay law enforcement information without compromise of the information, protection of investigative techniques and efforts employed, and identities of confidential sources who might not otherwise come forward and who furnished information under an express promise that the sources' identity would be held in confidence (or prior to the effective date of the Act, under an implied promise).
(ii) From subsections (e)(1), (e)(4)(G), (H), and (I) because it will provide protection against notification of investigatory material including certain reciprocal investigations and counterintelligence information, which might alert a subject to the fact that an investigation of that individual is taking place, and the disclosure of which would weaken the on-going investigation, reveal investigatory techniques, and place confidential informants in jeopardy who furnished information under an express promise that the sources' identity would be held in confidence (or prior to the effective date of the Act, under an implied promise).
(iii) From subsections (d) and (f) because requiring DSS to grant access to records and agency rules for access and amendment of records would unfairly impede the agency's investigation of allegations of unlawful activities. To require DSS to confirm or deny the existence of a record pertaining to a requesting individual may in itself provide an answer to that individual relating to an on-going investigation. The investigation of possible unlawful activities would be jeopardized by agency rules requiring verification of record, disclosure of the record to the subject, and record amendment procedures.
(f) System identifier: V5-03.
(1) System name: Case Control Management System (CCMS).
(2) Exemption: (i) Investigatory material compiled for law enforcement purposes may be exempt pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2). However, if an individual is denied any right, privilege, or benefit for which he would otherwise be entitled by Federal law or for which he would otherwise be eligible, as a result of the maintenance of such information, the individual will be provided access to such information except to the extent that disclosure would reveal the identity of a confidential source.
(ii) Investigatory material compiled solely for the purpose of determining suitability, eligibility, or qualifications for federal civilian employment, military service, federal contracts, or access to classified information may be exempt pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(5), but only to the extent that such material would reveal the identity of a confidential source. Any portion of this system that falls under the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2) or (k)(5) may be exempt from the following subsections of 5 U.S.C. 552a: (c)(3); (d); (e)(1); (e)(4)(G), (H), and (I); and (f).
(3) Authority. 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2) and (k)(5).
(4) Reasons. (i) From subsection (c)(3) because it will enable DSS to conduct certain investigations and relay law enforcement information without compromise of the information, protection of investigative techniques and efforts employed, and identities of confidential sources who might not otherwise come forward and who furnished information under an express promise that the sources' identity would be held in confidence (or prior to the effective date of the Act, under an implied promise).
(ii) From subsections (e)(1), (e)(4)(G), (H), and (I) because it will provide protection against notification of investigatory material including certain reciprocal investigations and counterintelligence information, which might alert a subject to the fact that an investigation of that individual is taking place, and the disclosure of which would weaken the on-going investigation, reveal investigatory techniques, and place confidential informants in jeopardy who furnished information under an express promise that the sources' identity would be held in confidence (or prior to the effective date of the Act, under an implied promise).
(iii) From subsections (d) and (f) because requiring DSS to grant access to records and agency rules for access and amendment of records would unfairly impede the agency's investigation of allegations of unlawful activities. To require DSS to confirm or deny the existence of a record pertaining to a requesting individual may in itself provide an answer to that individual relating to an on-going investigation. The investigation of possible unlawful activities would be jeopardized by agency rules requiring verification of record, disclosure of the record to the subject, and record amendment procedures.
(g) System identifier: V5-04.
(1) System name: Counterintelligence Issues Database (CII-DB).
(2) Exemption: (i) Information specifically authorized to be classified under E.O. 12958, as implemented by DoD 5200.1-R, may be exempt pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(1).
(ii) Investigatory material compiled for law enforcement purposes may be exempt pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2). However, if an individual is denied any right, privilege, or benefit for which he would otherwise be entitled by Federal law or for which he would otherwise be eligible, as a result of the maintenance of such information, the individual will be provided access to such information except to the extent that disclosure would reveal the identity of a confidential source.
(iii) Records maintained in connection with providing protective services to the President and other individuals under 18 U.S.C. 3506, may be exempt pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(3).
(iv) Investigatory material compiled solely for the purpose of determining suitability, eligibility, or qualifications for federal civilian employment, military service, federal contracts, or access to classified information may be exempt pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(5), but only to the extent that such material would reveal the identity of a confidential source.
(v) Any portion of this system that falls within the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(1), (k)(2), (k)(3) and (k)(5) may be exempt from the following subsections (c)(3); (d)(1) through (d)(5); (e)(1); (e)(4)(G), (H), and (I); and (f).
(3) Authority. 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(1), (k)(2), (k)(3) and (k)(5).
(4) Reasons. (i) From subsection (c)(3) because giving the individual access to the disclosure accounting could alert the subject of an investigation to the existence and nature of the investigation and reveal investigative or prosecutive interest by other agencies, particularly in a joint-investigation situation. This would seriously impede or compromise the investigation and case preparation by prematurely revealing its existence and nature; compromise or interfere with witnesses or make witnesses reluctant to cooperate with the investigators; lead to suppression, alteration, fabrication, or destruction of evidence; and endanger the physical safety of confidential sources, witnesses, law enforcement personnel and their families.
(ii) From subsection (d) because the application of these provisions could impede or compromise an investigation or prosecution if the subject of an investigation had access to the records or were able to use such rules to learn of the existence of an investigation before it would be completed. In addition, the mere notice of the fact of an investigation could inform the subject and others that their activities are under or may become the subject of an investigation and could enable the subjects to avoid detection or apprehension, to influence witnesses improperly, to destroy evidence, or to fabricate testimony.
(iii) From subsection (e)(1) because during an investigation it is not always possible to detect the relevance or necessity of each piece of information in the early stages of an investigation. In some cases, it is only after the information is evaluated in light of other evidence that its relevance and necessity will be clear. In other cases, what may appear to be a relevant and necessary piece of information may become irrelevant in light of further investigation. In addition, during the course of an investigation, the investigator may obtain information that related primarily to matters under the investigative jurisdiction of another agency, and that information may not be reasonably segregated. In the interest of effective law enforcement, DSS investigators should retain this information, since it can aid in establishing patterns of criminal activity and can provide valuable leads for Federal and other law enforcement agencies.
(iv) From subsections (e)(4)(G), (e)(4)(H), (e)(4)(I) and (f) because this system is exempt from subsection (d) of the Act, concerning access to records. These requirements are inapplicable to the extent that these records will be exempt from these subsections. However, DSS has published information concerning its notification and access procedures, and the records source categories because under certain circumstances, DSS could decide it is appropriate for an individual to have access to all or a portion of his/her records in this system of records.
(h) [Reserved]
[64 FR 49660, Sept. 14, 1999, as amended at 70 FR 38009, July 1, 2005; 76 FR 22808, Apr. 25, 2011]

Title 32 published on 2013-07-01

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