33 CFR 154.1045 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group I through Group IV petroleum oils.

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§ 154.1045 Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group I through Group IV petroleum oils.
(a) The owner or operator of a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group I through Group IV petroleum oils shall use the criteria in this section to evaluate response resources identified in the response plan for the specified operating environment.
(1) The criteria in Table 1 of appendix C of this part are to be used solely for identification of appropriate equipment in a response plan. These criteria reflect conditions used for planning purposes to select mechanical response equipment and are not conditions that would limit response actions or affect normal facility operations.
(2) The response resources must be evaluated considering limitations for the COTP zones in which the facility operates, including but not limited to—
(i) Ice conditions;
(ii) Debris;
(iii) Temperature ranges;
(iv) Weather-related visibility; and
(v) Other appropriate environmental conditions as determined by the COTP.
(3) The COTP may reclassify a specific body of water or location within the COTP zone. Any reclassifications will be identified by the COTP in the applicable ACP. Reclassifications may be to—
(i) A more stringent operating environment if the prevailing wave conditions exceed the significant wave height criteria during more than 35 percent of the year; or
(ii) A less stringent operating environment if the prevailing wave conditions do not exceed the significant wave height criteria for the less stringent operating environment during more than 35 percent of the year.
(b) Response equipment must—
(1) Meet or exceed the operating criteria listed in Table 1 of appendix C of this part;
(2) Function in the applicable operating environment; and
(3) Be appropriate for the petroleum oil carried.
(c) The response plan for a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group I through Group IV petroleum oils must identify response resources that are available, by contract or other approved means as described in § 154.1028(a)(1)(4), to respond to the facility's average most probable discharge. The response resources must include, at a minimum—
(1) 1,000 feet of containment boom or two times the length of the largest vessel that regularly conducts petroleum oil transfers to or from the facility, whichever is greater, and the means of deploying and anchoring the boom available at the spill site within 1 hour of the detection of a spill; and
(2) Oil recovery devices and recovered oil storage capacity capable of being at the spill site within 2 hours of the discovery of a petroleum oil discharge from a facility.
(d) The response plan for a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group I through Group IV petroleum oils must identify response resources that are available, by contract or other approved means as described in § 154.1028(a)(1)(4), to respond to a discharge up to the facility's maximum most probable discharge volume.
(1) The response resources must include sufficient containment boom, oil recovery devices, and storage capacity for any recovery of up to the maximum most probable discharge planning volume, as contained in appendix C.
(2) The response resources must be appropriate for each group of petroleum oil identified in § 154.1020 that is handled, stored, or transported by the facility.
(3) These response resources must be positioned such that they can arrive at the scene of a discharge within the following specified times:
(i) The equipment identified in paragraphs (c)(1) and (c)(2) of this section or in § 154.1040(d) must arrive within the times specified in those paragraphs or that section, as appropriate.
(ii) In higher volume port areas and the Great Lakes, response resources must be capable of arriving on scene within 6 hours of the discovery of a petroleum oil discharge from a facility.
(iii) In all other locations, response resources must be capable of arriving on scene within 12 hours of the discovery of a petroleum oil discharge from a facility.
(4) The COTP may determine that mobilizing response resources to an area beyond the response times indicated in this paragraph invalidates the response plan. In this event, the COTP may impose additional operational restrictions (e.g., limitations on the number of transfers at a facility), or, at the COTP's discretion, the facility may operate with temporarily modified response plan development and evaluation criteria (e.g., modified response times, alternate response resources, etc.).
(e) The response plan for a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group I through Group IV petroleum oils must identify the response resources that are available, by contract or other approved means as described in § 154.1028(a)(1)(4), to respond to the worst case discharge volume of petroleum oil to the maximum extent practicable.
(1) The location of these response resources must be suitable to meet the response times identified in paragraph (f) of this section for the applicable geographic area(s) of operation and response tier.
(2) The response resources must be appropriate for—
(i) The volume of the facility's worst case discharge;
(ii) Group(s) of petroleum oil as identified in § 154.1020 that are handled, stored, or transported by the facility; and
(iii) The geographic area(s) in which the facility operates.
(3) The response resources must include sufficient boom, oil recovery devices, and storage capacity to recover the worst case discharge planning volumes.
(4) The guidelines in appendix C of this part must be used for calculating the quantity of response resources required to respond at each tier to the worst case discharge to the maximum extent practicable.
(5) When determining response resources necessary to meet the requirements of this section, a portion of those resources must be capable of use in close-to-shore response activities in shallow water. The following percentages of the response equipment identified for the applicable geographic area must be capable of operating in waters of 6 feet or less depth.
(i) Offshore—10 percent.
(ii) Nearshore/inland/Great Lakes/rivers and canals—20 percent.
(6) The COTP may determine that mobilizing response resources to an area beyond the response times indicated in this paragraph invalidates the response plan. In this event, the COTP may impose additional operational restrictions (e.g., limitations on the number of transfers at a facility), or, at the COTP's discretion, the facility may be permitted to operate with temporarily modified response plan development and evaluation criteria (e.g., modified response times, alternate response resources, etc.).
(f) Response equipment identified in a response plan for a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group I through Group IV petroleum oils must be capable of arriving on scene within the times specified in this paragraph for the applicable response tier in a higher volume port area, Great Lakes, and in other areas. Response times for these tiers from the time of discovery of a discharge are—
Tier 1 (hrs.) Tier 2 (hrs.) Tier 3 (hrs.)
Higher volume port area (except for a TAPAA facility located in Prince William Sound, see § 154.1135) 6 30 54
Great Lakes 12 36 60
All other river and canal, inland, nearshore, and offshore areas 12 36 60
(g) For the purposes of arranging for response resources for a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group I through Group IV petroleum oils, by contract or other approved means as described in § 154.1028(a)(1)-(4), response equipment identified for Tier 1 plan credit must be capable of being mobilized and en route to the scene of a discharge within 2 hours of notification. The notification procedures identified in the plan must provide for notification and authorization of mobilization of identified Tier 1 response resources—
(1) Either directly or through the qualified individual; and
(2) Within 30 minutes of a discovery of a discharge or substantial threat of discharge.
(h) Response resources identified for Tier 2 and Tier 3 plan credit must be capable of arriving on scene within the time specified for the applicable tier.
(i) The owner or operator of a facility that handles, stores, or transports groups II through IV petroleum oils within the inland, nearshore, or offshore areas where pre-authorization for dispersant use exists must identify in their response plan, and ensure the availability of, through contract or other approved means, response resources capable of conducting dispersant operations within those areas.
(1) Dispersant response resources must be capable of commencing dispersant-application operations at the site of a discharge within 7 hours of the decision by the Federal On-Scene Coordinator to use dispersants.
(2) Dispersant response resources must include all of the following:
(i) Sufficient volumes of dispersants for application as required by paragraph (i)(3) of this section. Any dispersants identified in a response plan must be of a type listed on the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan Product Schedule (which is contained in 40 CFR part 300, and available online from the U.S. Government Printing Office).
(ii) Dispersant-application platforms capable of delivering and applying the dispersant on a discharge in the amounts as required by paragraph (i)(3) of this section. At least 50 percent of each EDAC tier requirement must be achieved through the use of fixed-wing, aircraft-based application platforms. For dispersant-application platforms not detailed within the DMP2, adequacy of performance criteria must be documented by presentation of independent evaluation materials (e.g., field tests and reports of actual use) that record the performance of the platform.
(iii) Dispersant-application systems that are consistent in design with, and are capable of applying dispersants within, the performance criteria in ASTM F1413-07 (incorporated by reference, see§ 154.106). For dispersant-application systems not fully covered by ASTM F1413-07, such as fire monitor-type applicators, adequacy of performance criteria must be documented by presentation of independent evaluation materials (e.g., laboratory tests, field tests, and reports of actual use) that record the design of performance specifications.
(iv) Dispersant-application personnel trained in and capable of applying dispersants according to the recommended procedures contained within ASTM F1737-07 (incorporated by reference, see§ 154.106).
(3) Dispersant stockpiles, application platforms, and other supporting resources must be available in a quantity and type sufficient to treat a facility's worst-case discharge (as determined by using the criteria in appendix C, section 8) or in quantities sufficient to meet the requirements in Table 154.1045(i) of this section, whichever is the lesser amount.
Table 154.1045(i)—Tiers for Effective Daily Application Capability
Response time forcompleted application (hours) Dispersantapplication dispersant: oil treated in gallons (Gulf Coast) Dispersant applicationdispersant: oil treated in gallons all other U.S.
Tier 1 12 8,250:165,000 4,125:82,500
Tier 2 36 23,375:467,000 23,375:467,000
Tier 3 60 23,375:467,000 23,375:467,000
Total 60 55,000:1,100,000 50,875:1,017,500
Note to Table 154.1045(i):
Gulf Coast Tier 1 is higher due to greater potential spill size and frequency in that area, and it is assumed that dispersant stockpiles would be centralized in the Gulf area. Alternative application ratios may be considered based upon submission to Coast Guard Headquarters, Office of Incident Management and Preparedness (CG-533, 202-372-2234, 2100 2nd Street, SW., room 2100, Washington, DC 20593) of peer-reviewed scientific evidence of improved capability.
(j) The owner or operator of a facility handling Groups I through IV petroleum oil as a primary cargo must identify in the response plan, and ensure the availability through contract or other approved means, of response resources necessary to provide aerial oil tracking to support oil spill assessment and cleanup activities. Facilities operating exclusively on inland rivers are not required to comply with this paragraph. Aerial oil tracking resources must:
(1) Be capable of arriving at the site of a discharge in advance of the arrival of response resources identified in the plan for tiers 1, 2, and 3 Worst-Case Discharge response times, and for a distance up to 50 nautical miles from shore (excluding inland rivers);
(2) Be capable of supporting oil spill removal operations continuously for three 10-hour operational periods during the initial 72 hours of the discharge;
(3) Include appropriately located aircraft and personnel capable of meeting the response time requirement for oil tracking from paragraph (j)(1) of this section; and
(4) Include sufficient numbers of aircraft, pilots, and trained observation personnel to support oil spill removal operations, commencing upon initial assessment, and capable of coordinating on-scene cleanup operations, including dispersant and mechanical recovery operations. Observation personnel must be trained in:
(i) The protocols of oil-spill reporting and assessment, including estimation of slick size, thickness, and quantity; and
(ii) The use of assessment techniques in ASTM F1779-08 (incorporated by reference, see§ 154.106), and familiar with the use of other guides, such as NOAA's “Open Water Oil Identification Job Aid for Aerial Observation,” and NOAA's “Characteristic Coastal Habitats” guide (available on the Internet at http://response.restoration.noaa.gov/ use the following links in the order presented: Home|Emergency Response|Responding to Oil Spills).
(k) A response plan for a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group I through Group IV petroleum oils must identify response resources with firefighting capability. The owner or operator of a facility that does not have adequate firefighting resources located at the facility or that can not rely on sufficient local firefighting resources must identify and ensure, by contract or other approved means as described in § 154.1028(a)(1)-(4), the availability of adequate firefighting resources. The response plan must also identify an individual located at the facility to work with the fire department for petroleum oil fires. This individual shall also verify that sufficient well-trained firefighting resources are available within a reasonable time to respond to a worst case discharge. The individual may be the qualified individual as defined in § 154.1020 and identified in the response plan or another appropriate individual located at the facility.
(l) The response plan for a facility that handles, stores, or transports Groups I through IV petroleum oils must identify equipment and required personnel available, by contract or other approved means as described in § 154.1028(a) (1)-(4), to protect fish and wildlife and sensitive environments.
(1) Except as set out in paragraph (k)(2) of this section, the identified response resources must include the quantities of boom sufficient to protect fish and wildlife and sensitive environments as required by § 154.1035(b)(4).
(2) The resources and response methods identified in a facility response plan must be consistent with the required resources and response methods to be used in fish and wildlife and sensitive environments, contained in the appropriate ACP. Facility owners or operators shall ensure that their response plans are in accordance with the ACP in effect 6 months prior to initial plan submission or the annual plan review required under § 154.1065(a). Facility owners or operators are not required to, but may at their option, conform to an ACP which is less than 6 months old at the time of plan submission.
(m) The response plan for a facility that handles, stores, or transports Groups I through IV petroleum oils must identify an oil spill removal organization(s) with response resources that are available, by contract or other approved means as described in § 154.1028(a) (1)-(4), to effect a shoreline cleanup operation commensurate with the quantity of emulsified petroleum oil to be planned for in shoreline cleanup operations.
(1) Except as required in paragraph (l)(2) of this section, the shoreline cleanup response resources required must be determined as described in appendix C of this part.
(2) The resources and response methods identified in a facility response plan must be consistent with the required shoreline cleanup resources and methods contained in the appropriate ACP. Facility owners or operators shall ensure that their response plans are in accordance with the ACP in effect 6 months prior to initial plan submission or the annual plan review required under § 154.1065(a). Facility owners or operators are not required to, but may at their option, conform to an ACP which is less than 6 months old at the time of plan submission.
(n) Appendix C of this part describes the procedures to determine the maximum extent practicable quantity of response resources that must be identified and available, by contract or other approved means as described in § 154.1028(a) (1)-(4), for the maximum most probable discharge volume, and for each worst case discharge response tier.
(1) Included in appendix C of this part is a cap that recognizes the practical and technical limits of response capabilities that an individual facility owner or operator can be expected to contract for in advance.
(2) Table 5 in appendix C of this part lists the caps that apply in February 18, 1993, and February 18, 1998. Depending on the quantity and type of petroleum oil handled by the facility and the facility's geographic area of operations, the resource capability caps in this table may be reached. The owner or operator of a facility whose estimated recovery capacity exceeds the applicable contracting caps in Table 5 shall identify sources of additional equipment equal to twice the cap listed in Tiers 1, 2, and 3 or the amount necessary to reach the calculated planning volume, whichever is lower. The identified resources must be capable of arriving on scene not later than the Tier 1, 2, and 3 response times in this section. No contract is required. While general listings of available response equipment may be used to identify additional sources, a response plan must identify the specific sources, locations, and quantities of equipment that a facility owner or operator has considered in his or her planning. When listing Coast Guard classified oil spill removal organization(s) which have sufficient removal capacity to recover the volume above the response capability cap for the specific facility, as specified in Table 5 in appendix C of this part, it is not necessary to list specific quantities of equipment.
(o) The Coast Guard will continue to evaluate the environmental benefits, cost efficiency and practicality of increasing mechanical recovery capability requirements. This continuing evaluation is part of the Coast Guard's long term commitment to achieving and maintaining an optimum mix of oil spill response capability across the full spectrum of response modes. As best available technology demonstrates a need to evaluate or change mechanical recovery capacities, a review of cap increases and other requirements contained within this subpart may be performed. Any changes in the requirements of this section will occur through a public notice and comment process. During this review, the Coast Guard will determine if established caps remain practicable and if increased caps will provide any benefit to oil spill recovery operations. The review will include, at least, an evaluation of:
(1) Best available technologies for containment and recovery;
(2) Oil spill tracking technology;
(3) High rate response techniques;
(4) Other applicable response technologies; and
(5) Increases in the availability of private response resources.
[CGD 91-036, 61 FR 7917, Feb. 29, 1996, as amended by USCG-2001-8661, 74 FR 45024, Aug. 31, 2009]

Title 33 published on 2014-07-01

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  • 2014-07-07; vol. 79 # 129 - Monday, July 7, 2014
    1. 79 FR 38422 - Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments
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      DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, Coast Guard
      Final rule.
      This final rule is effective July 7, 2014.
      33 CFR Parts 1, 3, 8, 13, 19, 23, 25, 26, 27, 51, 52, 67, 80, 81, 84, 89, 96, 104, 105, 110, 114, 116, 117, 118, 120, 126, 127, 128, 135, 140, 141, 144, 148, 151, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 169, 174, 179, 181, and 183

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Title 33 published on 2014-07-01

The following are ALL rules, proposed rules, and notices (chronologically) published in the Federal Register relating to 33 CFR 154 after this date.

  • 2014-07-07; vol. 79 # 129 - Monday, July 7, 2014
    1. 79 FR 38422 - Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, Coast Guard
      Final rule.
      This final rule is effective July 7, 2014.
      33 CFR Parts 1, 3, 8, 13, 19, 23, 25, 26, 27, 51, 52, 67, 80, 81, 84, 89, 96, 104, 105, 110, 114, 116, 117, 118, 120, 126, 127, 128, 135, 140, 141, 144, 148, 151, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 169, 174, 179, 181, and 183