33 CFR 207.718 - Navigation locks and approach channels, Columbia and Snake Rivers, Oreg. and Wash.

§ 207.718 Navigation locks and approach channels, Columbia and Snake Rivers, Oreg. and Wash.
(a) General. All locks, approach channels, and all lock appurtenances, shall be under the jurisdiction of the District Engineer, Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, in charge of the locality. The district engineer may, after issuing a public notice and providing a 30-day opportunity for public comment, set (issue) a schedule for the daily lockage of recreational vessels. Recreational vessels are pleasure boats such a row, sail, or motor boats used for recreational purposes. Commercial vessels include licensed commercial passenger vessels operating on a published schedule or regularly operating in the “for hire” trade. Any recreational schedule shall provide for a minimum of one scheduled recreation lockage upstream and downstream (two lockages) each day. At the discretion of the district engineer, additional lockages may be scheduled. Each schedule and any changes to the schedule will be issued at least 30 days prior to implementation. Prior to issuing any schedule or any change to the schedule, the district engineer will consider all public comments and will evaluate the expected energy situation, water supply, and recreation use of the lock to determine the seasonal need for the schedule or change in schedule. The district engineer's representative at the locks shall be the project engineer, who shall issue orders and instructions to the lockmaster in charge of the lock. Hereinafter, the term “lockmaster” shall be used to designate the person in immediate charge of the lock at any given time. In case of emergency and on all routine work in connection with the operation of the lock, the lockmaster shall have authority to take action without waiting for instructions from the project engineer.
(b) Lockage control. The Lock Master shall be charged with immediate control and management of the lock, and of the area set aside as the lock area, including the lock approach channels. Upstream and downstream approach channels extend to the end of the wing or the guide wall, whichever is longer. At Bonneville lock the upstream approach channel extends to the mooring tie offs at Fort Rains and the downstream approach channel extends to the downstream tip of Robins Island. The Lock Master shall demand compliance with all laws, rules and regulations for the use of the lock and lock area and is authorized to issue necessary orders and directions, both to employees of the Government or to other persons within the limits of the lock or lock area, whether navigating the lock or not. Use of lock facilities is contingent upon compliance with regulations, Lock Master instructions and the safety of people and property.
(c) Authority of Lock Master. No one shall initiate any movement of any vessel in the lock or approaches except by or under the direction of the Lock Master. (“Vessel” as used herein includes all connected units, tugs, barges, tows, boats or other floating objects.)
(d) Signals—
(1) Radio. All locks are equipped with two-way FM radio operating on channel 14, frequency of 156.700 MHz, for both the calling channel and the working channel. Vessels equipped with two-way radio desiring a lockage shall call WUJ 33 Bonneville, WUJ 34 The Dalles, WUJ 35 John Day, WUJ 41 McNary, WUJ 42 Ice Harbor, WUJ 43 Lower Monumental, WUJ 44 Little Goose, or WUJ 45 Lower Granite, at least one-half hour in advance of arrival since the Lock Master is not in constant attendance of the locks. Channel 14 shall be monitored constantly in the vessel pilot house from the time the vessel enters the approach channel until its completion of exit. Prior to entering the lock chamber, the commercial freight or log-tow vessel operator shall report the nature of any cargo, the maximum length, width and draft of the vessel and whether the vessel is in any way hazardous because of its condition or the cargo it carries or has carried.
(2) Pull-cord signal stations. Pull-cord signal stations marked by large instructional signs and located near the end of the upstream and downstream lock entrance walls may be used in place of radios to signal the Lock Master for a lockage.
(3) Entering and exit signals. Signal lights are located outside each lock gate. When the green (go) light is on, all vessels will enter in the sequence prescribed by the Lock Master. When the red (stop) light is on, the lock is not ready for entrance and vessels shall stand clear. In addition to the above visual signals, the Lock Master will signal that the lock is ready for entrance by sounding one long blast on the lock air horn. The Lock Master will signal that the lock is ready for exit by lighting the green exit light and sounding one short blast on the air horn.
(4) Craft lockage-readiness signal. Upon query from Lock Master, a vessel operator will signal when he is properly moored and ready for the lockage to begin.
(e) Permissible dimensions of vessels. Nominal overall dimensions of vessels allowed in the lock chamber are 84 feet wide and 650 feet long. Depth of water in the lock depends upon river levels which may vary from day to day. Staff gauges showing the minimum water level depth over gate sills are located inside the lock chamber near each lock gate and outside the lock chamber near the end of both upstream and downstream guide walls, except at Bonneville where the staff gauges show water levels in feet above MSL and are located on the southern guide walls at the upstream and downstream miter gates. Bonneville's upstream sill elevation is 51 feet MSL and the downstream sill elevation is −12 feet MSL. Depth over sill at Bonneville is determined by subtracting the sill elevation from the gauge reading. Vessels shall not enter the navigation lock unless the vessel draft is at least one foot less than the water depth over the sill. Information concerning allowable draft for vessel passage through the locks may be obtained from the Lock Master. Minimum lock chamber water level depth is 15 feet except at Ice Harbor where it is 14 feet and at Bonneville where it is 19 feet. When the river flow at Lower Granite exceeds 330,000 cubic feet per second the normal minimum 15-foot depth may be decreased to as little as eight feet.
(f) Precedence at lock. Subject to the order of precedence, the vessel or tow arriving first; at the lock will be locked through first, however, this precedence may be modified at the discretion of the lockmaster. If immediate passage is required, lockage of vessels owned or operated by the United States shall take precedence. The precedence of all other vessels shall be as follows:
(1) When a recreational vessel lockage schedule is in effect, at the appointed time for lockage of recreation craft, recreation craft shall take precedence; however, commercial vessels may be locked through with recreation craft if safety and space permit. At other than the appointed time, the lockage of commercial and tow vessels shall take precedence and recreational craft may (only) lock through with commercial vessels only as provided in paragraph (h) of this section.
(2) If a recreational vessel lockage schedule is not in effect, commercial and tow vessels shall take precedence. Recreational craft may be locked through with commercial craft. If no commercial vessels are scheduled to be locked through within a reasonable time, not to exceed one hour after the arrival of the recreational vessels at the lock, the recreational vessel may be locked through separately. If a combined lockage cannot be arranged, the recreational craft shall be locked through after waiting three commercial lockages.
(g) Loss of turn. Vessels that fail to enter the lock with reasonable promptness, after being authorized to do so, shall lose their turn.
(h) Lockage—
(1) Multiple lockage. The Lock Master shall decide whether one or more vessels or tows may be locked through at the same time. Vessels with flammable or highly hazardous cargo will be passed separately from all other vessels. Hazardous materials are described in part 171, title 49, Code of Federal Regulations. Flammable materials are defined in the National Fire Code of the National Fire Protection Association.
(2) Recreational craft. By mutual agreement of (all parties,) the lockmaster and the captains of the vessels involved, recreational vessels may be locked through with commercial vessels. Under the recreational vessel schedule, separate lockage will not be made by recreational vessels except in accordance with the recreational lockage schedule or when circumstances warrant, such as in an emergency. When recreational craft are locked simultaneously with commercial vessels, the recreational vessel will enter the lock chamber after the commercial vessel is secured in the chamber and when practicable will depart while the commercial vessel remains secured.
(3) Special schedules. Recreational boating groups may request special schedules by contacting the district engineer. The schedule for the daily lockage of recreational vessels will indicate the number of boats required for a special schedule and how many days' notice is required in order to arrange a special schedule.
(i) Mooring in approaches prohibited. Mooring or anchoring in the approaches to the lock is prohibited where such mooring will interfere with navigation.
(j) Waiting for lockage. Vessels waiting for lockage shall wait in the clear outside of the lock approach channel, or contingent upon permission by the Lock Master, may at their own risk, lie inside the approach channel at a place specified by the Lock Master. At Bonneville, vessels may at their own risk, lay-to at the downstream moorage facility on the north shore downstream from the north guide wall provided a 100-foot-wide open channel is maintained.
(k) Mooring in lock. All vessels must be moored within the lock chamber so that no portion of any vessel extends beyond the lines painted on the lock walls. Moorage within the lock chamber will be to floating mooring bits only and will be accomplished in a proper no-slip manner. Small vessels will not be locked with a large vessel unless the large vessel is so moored (two mooring bits) that no lateral movement is possible. The vessel operator will constantly monitor the position of his vessel and his mooring bit ties to assure that there is no fore or aft movement of his vessel and lateral movement is minimized. Propulsion by vessels within the lock chamber will not be permitted during closure operation of a lock chamber gate or as otherwise directed by the Lock Master.
(l) Crew to move craft. During the entire lockage, the vessel operator shall constantly attend the wheelhouse, be aware of the vessel's position, and monitor radio channel 14 on frequency 156.700 MHz, or otherwise be constantly able to communicate with the Lock Master. At a minimum, vessels shall be as vigilantly manned as if underway.
(m) Speed. Vessels shall be adequately powered to maintain a safe speed and be under control at all times. Vessels shall not be raced or crowded alongside another in the approach channels. When entering the lock, speed shall be reduced to a minimum consistent with safe navigation. As a general rule, when a number of vessels are entering the lock, the following vessel shall remain at least 200 feet astern of the vessel ahead.
(n) Delay in lock. Vessels shall not unnecessarily delay any operation of the locks.
(o) Landing of freight. No freight, baggage, personnel, or passengers shall be landed on or over the walls of the lock, except by permission and direction of the Lock Master.
(p) Damage to lock or other structures. The regulations in this section shall not relieve owners and/or operators of vessels from liability for any damage to the lock or other structures or for the immediate removal of any obstruction. No vessel in less than stable floating condition or having unusual sinking potential shall enter the locks or its approaches. Vessels must use great care not to strike any part of the lock, any gate or appurtenance thereto, or machinery for operating the gates, or the walls protecting the banks of the approach channels. All vessels with projecting irons, or rough surfaces which may damage the gates or lock walls, shall not enter the lock unless provided with suitable buffers and fenders. Vessels having chains, lines, or drags either hanging over the sides or ends or dragging on the bottom for steering or other purposes will not be permitted to pass.
(q) Tows. Prior to a lockage, the person in charge of a vessel towing a second vessel by lines shall, at a safe distance outside of the incoming approach channel, secure the second vessel to the towing vessel and keep it secured during the entire course of a lockage and until safely clear of the outgoing approach channel.
(r) Violation of regulations. Any violation of these regulations may subject the owner or master of any vessel to any or all of the following: (1) Penalties prescribed by law of the U.S. Government (33 U.S.C. part 1); (2) Report of violation to the titled owner of the vessel; (3) Report of violation to the U.S. Coast Guard; (4) Refusal of lockage at the time of violation.
(s) Refuse in locks. No material of any kind shall be thrown or discharged into the lock, or be deposited in the lock area. Vessels leaking or spilling cargo will be refused lockage and suitable reports will be made to the U.S. Coast Guard. Deck cargo will be so positioned so as not to be subject to falling overboard.
(t) Handling valves, gates, bridges, and machinery. No person, unless authorized by the Lock Master, shall open or close any bridge, gate, valve, or operate any machinery in connection with the lock. However, the Lock Master may call for assistance from the master of any vessel using the lock, should such aid be necessary; and when rendering such assistance, the person so employed shall be directly under the orders of the Lock Master. Masters of vessels refusing to provide such assistance when it is requested of them may be denied the use of the lock by the Lock Master.
(u) -(v) [Reserved]
(w) Restricted areas. No vessel shall enter or remain in any restricted area at any time without first obtaining permission from the District Engineer, Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, or his duly authorized representative.
(1) At Bonneville Lock and Dam. The water restricted to all vessels, except Government vessels, are described as all waters of the Columbia River and Bradford Slough within 1,000 feet above the first powerhouse, spillway, and second powerhouse (excluding the new navigation lock channel) and all waters below the first powerhouse, spillway, second powerhouse, and old navigation lock. This is bounded by a line commencing from the westernmost tip of Robins Island on the Oregon side of the river and running in a South 65 degrees West direction a distance of approximately 2,100 feet to a point 50 feet upstream of the Hamilton Island Boat Ramp on the Washington shore. Signs designate the restricted areas. The approach channel to the new navigation lock is outside the restricted area.
(2) At the Dalles Dam. The waters restricted to only Government vessels are described as all downstream waters other than those of the navigation lock downstream approach channel which lie between the Wasco County Bridge and the project axis including those waters between the powerhouse and the Oregon shore and all upstream waters other than those of the navigation lock upstream approach channel which lie between the project axis and a line projected from the upstream end of the navigation lock guide wall to the junction of the concrete structure with the earth fill section of the dam near the upstream end of the powerhouse.
(3) At the John Day Dam. The waters restricted to only Government vessels are described as all of the waters within a distance of about 1,000 yards above the dam lying south of the navigation channel leading to the lock and bounded by a line commencing at the upstream end of the guide wall, and running in a direction 54°01′37″ true for a distance of 771 yards, thence 144°01′37″ true across the river to the south shoreline. The downstream limit is marked by orange and white striped monuments on the north and south shores.
(4) At McNary Lock and Dam. The waters restricted to all vessels, except to Government vessels, are described as all waters commencing at the upstream end of the Oregon fish ladder thence running in the direction of 39°28′ true for a distance of 540 yards; thence 7°49′ true for a distance of 1,078 yards; thence 277°10′ for a distance of 468 yards to the upstream end of the navigation lock guidewall. The downstream limits commence at the downstream end of the navigation lock guidewall thence to the south (Oregon) shore at right angles and parallel to the axis of the dam. Signs designate the restricted areas.
(5) At Ice Harbor Lock and Dam. The waters restricted to all vessels, except Government vessels, are described as all waters within a distance of about 800 yards upstream of the dam lying south of the navigation lock and bound by the line commencing at the upstream end of the guidewall, and running a direction of 91°10′ true for a distance of 575 yards; thence 162°45′ to the south shore, a distance of about 385 yards. The downstream limits commencing at the downstream end of the guidewall; thence to the south shore, at right angles and parallel to the axis of the dam. Signs designate the restricted areas.
(6) At Lower Monumental Lock and Dam. The waters restricted to all vessels, except Government vessels, are described as all waters commencing at the upstream of the navigation lock guidewall and running in a direction of 46°25′ true for a distance of 344 yards; thence 326°19′ true for a distance of 362 yards; thence 243°19′ true for a distance of 218 yards; thence 275°59′ true to the north shore a distance of about 290 yards. The downstream limits commence at the downstream end of the navigation lock guidewall; thence to the north shore, at right angles and parallel to the axis of the dam. Signs designate the restricted areas.
(7) At Little Goose Lock and Dam. The waters restricted to all vessels, except Government vessels, are described as all waters commencing at the upstream of the navigation lock guidewall and running in a direction of 60°37′ true for a distance of 676 yards; thence 345°26′ true for a distance of 494 yards; thence 262°37′47″ true to the dam embankment shoreline. The downstream limits commence 512 yards downstream and at right angles to the axis of the dam on the south shore; thence parallel to the axis of the dam to the north shore. Signs designate the restricted areas.
(8) At Lower Granite Lock and Dam. The waters restricted to all vessels, except Government vessels, are described as all waters commencing at the upstream of the navigation lock guidewall thence running in the direction of 131°31′ true for a distance of 608 yards; thence 210°46′ true to the south shore, a distance of about 259 yards. The downstream limits commence at the downstream end of navigation lock guidewall; thence to the south shore, at right angles and parallel to the axis of the dam. Signs designate the restricted areas.
[43 FR 3115, Jan. 23, 1978, as amended at 52 FR 22310, June 11, 1987; 56 FR 13765, Apr. 4, 1991; 65 FR 4125, Jan. 26, 2000; 71 FR 25503, May 1, 2006]

Title 33 published on 2014-07-01

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