36 CFR 67.4 - Certifications of historic significance.

§ 67.4 Certifications of historic significance.
(a) Requests for certifications of historic significance should be made by the owner to determine—
(1) That a property located within a registered historic district is of historic significance to such district; or
(2) That a property located within a registered historic district is not of historic significance to such district; or
(3) That a property not yet on the National Register appears to meet National Register criteria; or
(4) That a property located within a potential historic district appears to contribute to the significance of such district.
(b) To determine whether or not a property is individually listed or is part of a district in the National Register, the owner may consult the listing of National Register properties in the Federal Register (found in most large libraries), or contact the appropriate SHPO for current information.
(c) If a property is located within the boundaries of a registered historic district and the owner wishes the Secretary to certify whether the property contributes or does not contribute to the historic significance of the district or if the owner is requesting a preliminary determination of significance in accordance with § 67.3(a)(4), the owner must complete part 1 of the Historic Preservation Certification Application according to instructions accompanying the application. Such documentation includes but is not limited to:
(1) Name and mailing address of owner;
(2) Name and address of property;
(3) Name of historic district;
(4) Current photographs of property; photographs of the building and its site and landscape features prior to alteration if rehabilitation has been completed; photograph(s) showing the property along with adjacent properties and structures on the street; and photographs of interior features and spaces adequate to document significance;
(5) Brief description of appearance including alterations, distinctive features and spaces, and date(s) of construction;
(6) Brief statement of significance summarizing how the property does or does not reflect the values that give the district its distinctive historical and visual character, and explaining any significance attached to the property itself (i.e., unusual building techniques, important event that took place there, etc.).
(7) Sketch map clearly delineating property's location within the district; and
(8) Signature of fee simple owner requesting or concurring in a request for evaluation.
(d) If a property is individually listed in the National Register, it is generally considered a certified historic structure and no further certification is required. More specific considerations in this regard are as follows:
(1) If the property is individually listed in the National Register and the owner believes it has lost the characteristics which caused it to be nominated and therefore wishes it delisted, the owner should refer to the delisting procedures outlined in 36 CFR part 60.
(2) Some properties individually listed in the National Register include more than one building. In such cases, the owner must submit a single part 1 application, as described in paragraph (c) of this section, which includes descriptions of all the buildings within the listing. The Secretary will utilize the Standards for Evaluating Significance within Registered Historic Districts (§ 67.5) for the purpose of determining which of the buildings included within the listing are of historic significance to the property. The requirements of this paragraph are applicable to certification requests received by the SHPOs (and the NPS WASO in the case of nonparticipating States only) upon the effective date of these regulations.
(e) Properties containing more than one building where the buildings are judged by the Secretary to have been functionally related historically to serve an overall purpose, such as a mill complex or a residence and carriage house, will be treated as a single certified historic structure, whether the property is individually listed in the National Register or is located within a registered historic district, when rehabilitated as part of an overall project. Buildings that are functionally related historically are those which have functioned together to serve an overall purpose during the property's period of significance. In the case of a property within a registered historic district which contains more than one building where the buildings are judged to be functionally related historically, an evaluation will be made to determine whether the component buildings contribute to the historic significance of the property and whether the property contributes to the significance of the historic district as in § 67.4(i). For questions concerning demolition of separate structures as part of an overall rehabilitation project, see § 67.6.
(f) Applications for preliminary determinations for individual listing must show how the property individually meets the National Register Criteria for Evaluation. An application for a property located in a potential historic district must document how the district meets the criteria and how the property contributes to the significance of that district. An application for a preliminary determination for a property in a registered historic district which is outside the period or area of significance in the district documentation on file with the NPS must document and justify the expanded significance of the district and how the property contributes to the significance of the district or document the individual significance of the property. Applications must contain substantially the same level of documentation as National Register nominations, as specified in 36 CFR part 60 and National Register Bulletin 16, “Guidelines for Completing National Register of Historic Places Forms” (available from SHPOs and NPS WASO). Applications must also include written assurance from the SHPO that the district nomination is being revised to expand its significance or, for certified districts, written assurance from the duly authorized representative that the district documentation is being revised to expand its significance, or that the SHPO is planning to nominate the property or the district. Owners should understand that confirmation of intent to nominate by a SHPO does not constitute listing in the National Register, nor does it constitute a certification of significance as required by law for Federal tax incentives. Owners should further understand that they are proceeding at their own risk. If the property or district is not listed in the National Register for procedural, substantive or other reasons; if the district documentation is not formally amended; or if the significance of the property has been lost as a result of alterations or damage, these preliminary determinations of significance will not become final. The SHPO must nominate the property or the district or the SHPO for National Register districts and the duly authorized representative in the case of certified districts must submit documentation and have it approved by the NPS to amend the National Register nomination or certified district or the property or district must be listed before the preliminary certification of significance can become final.
(g) For purposes of the other rehabilitation tax credits under section 47 of the Internal Revenue Code, properties within registered historic districts are presumed to contribute to the significance of such districts unless certified as nonsignificant by the Secretary. Owners of non-historic properties within registered historic districts, therefore, must obtain a certification of nonsignificance in order to qualify for those investment tax credits. If an owner begins or completes a substantial rehabilitation (as defined by the Internal Revenue Service) of a property in a registered historic district without knowledge of requirements for certification of nonsignificance, he or she may request certification that the property was not of historic significance to the district prior to substantial rehabilitation in the same manner as stated in paragraph (c) of this section. The owner should be aware, however, that the taxpayer must certify to the Secretary of the Treasury that, at the beginning of such substantial rehabilitation, he or she in good faith was not aware of the certification requirement by the Secretary of the Interior.
(h) The Secretary discourages the moving of historic buildings from their original sites. However, if a building is to be moved as part of a rehabilitation for which certification is sought, the owner must follow different procedures depending on whether the building is individually listed in the National Register or is within a registered historic district. When a building is moved, every effort should be made to re-establish its historic orientation, immediate setting, and general environment. Moving a building may result in removal of the property from the National Register or, for buildings within a registered historic district, denial or revocation of a certification of significance; consequently, a moved building may, in certain circumstances, be ineligible for rehabilitation certification.
(1) Documentation must be submitted that demonstrates:
(i) The effect of the move on the building's integrity and appearance (any proposed demolition, proposed changes in foundations, etc.);
(ii) Photographs of the site and general environment of the proposed site;
(iii) Evidence that the proposed site does not possess historical significance that would be adversely affected by the moved building;
(iv) The effect of the move on the distinctive historical and visual character of the district, where applicable; and
(v) The method to be used for moving the building.
(2) For buildings individually listed in the National Register, the procedures contained in 36 CFR part 60 must be followed prior to the move, or the building will be removed from the National Register, will not be considered a certified historic structure, and will have to be renominated for listing. The owner may submit a part 1 application in order to receive a preliminary determination from the NPS of whether a move will cause the property to be removed from the National Register. However, preliminary approval of such a part 1 application does not satisfy the requirements of 36 CFR part 60. The SHPO must follow the remaining procedures in that regulation so that the NPS can determine that the moved building will remain listed in the National Register and retain its status as a certified historic structure.
(3) If an owner moves (or proposes to move) a building into a registered historic district or moves (or proposes to move) a building elsewhere within a registered historic district, a part 1 application containing the required information described in paragraph (h)(1) of this section must be submitted. The building to be moved will be evaluated to determine if it contributes to the historic significance of the district both before and after the move as in § 67.4(i).
(i) Properties within registered historic districts will be evaluated to determine if they contribute to the historic significance of the district by application of the Secretary's Standards for Evaluating Significance within Registered Historic Districts as set forth in § 67.5.
(j) Once the significance of a property located within a registered historic district or a potential historic district has been determined by the Secretary, written notification will be sent to the owner and the SHPO in the form of a certification of significance or nonsignificance.
(k) Owners shall report to the Secretary through the SHPO any substantial damage, alteration or changes to a property that occurs after issuance of a certification of significance and prior to a final certification of rehabilitation. The Secretary may withdraw a certification of significance, upon thirty days notice to the owner, if a property has been damaged, altered or changed effective as of the date of the occurrence. The property may also be removed from the National Register, in accordance with the procedures in 36 CFR part 60. A revocation of certification of significance pursuant to this part may be appealed under § 67.10. For damage, alteration or changes caused by unacceptable rehabilitation work, see § 67.6(f).
[54 FR 6771, Feb. 26, 1990, as amended at 76 FR 30541, May 26, 2011]

Title 36 published on 2013-07-01

no entries appear in the Federal Register after this date.

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