36 CFR 7.22 - Grand Teton National Park.

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§ 7.22 Grand Teton National Park.
(a) Aircraft—Designated airstrip.
(1) Jackson Airport, located in SE1/4SE1/4sec. 10, SE1/4 and S1/2SW1/4sec. 11, S1/2 and NW1/4sec. 14, NW1/4NE1/4 and E1/2 NE1/4sec. 15, T. 42 N., R. 116 W., 6th Principal Meridian.
(2) [Reserved]
(b) Fishing.
(1) The following waters are closed to fishing: The Snake River for a distance of 150 feet below the downstream face of Jackson Lake Dam; Swan Lake; Sawmill Ponds; Hedrick's Pond; Christian Ponds; and Cottonwood Creek from the outlet of Jenny Lake downstream to the Saddle Horse Concession Bridge.
(2) Fishing from any bridge or boat dock is prohibited.
(3) Bait:
(i) The use or possession of fish eggs or fish for bait is prohibited on or along the shores of all park waters, except:
(ii) It is permissible to possess or use the following dead, non-game fish as bait on or along the shores of Jackson Lake:
(A) Redside Shiner
(B) Speckled Dace
(C) Longnose Dace
(D) Piute Sculpin
(E) Mottled Sculpin
(F) Utah Chub
(G) Utah Sucker
(H) Bluehead Sucker
(I) Mountain Sucker
(c) Stock grazing.
(1) Privileges for the grazing of domestic livestock based on authorized use of certain areas at the time of approval of the Act of September 14, 1950 (64 Stat. 849, Pub. L. 787), shall continue in effect or shall be renewed from time to time, except for failure to comply with such terms and conditions as may be prescribed by the Superintendent in these regulations and after reasonable notice of default and subject to the following provisions of tenure:
(i) Grazing privileges appurtenant to privately owned lands located within the park shall not be withdrawn until title to the lands to which such privileges are appurtenant shall have vested in the United States except for failure to comply with the regulations applicable thereto after reasonable notice of default.
(ii) Grazing privileges appurtenant to privately owned lands located outside the park shall not be withdrawn for a period of twenty-five years after September 14, 1950, and thereafter shall continue during the lifetime of the original permittee and his heirs if they were members of his immediate family as described herein, except for failure to comply with the regulations applicable thereto after reasonable notice of default.
(iii) Members of the immediate family are those persons who are related to and directly dependent upon a person or persons, living on or conducting grazing operations from lands, as of September 14, 1950, which the National Park Service recognized as base lands appurtenant to grazing privileges in the park. Such interpretation excludes mature children who, as of that date, were established in their own households and were not directly dependent upon the base lands and appurtenant grazing recognized by the National Park Service.
(iv) If title to base lands lying outside the park is conveyed, or such base lands are leased to someone other than a member of the immediate family of the permittee as of September 14, 1950, the grazing preference shall be recognized only for a period of twenty-five years from September 14, 1950.
(v) If title to a portion or part of the base land either outside or inside the park is conveyed or such base lands are leased, the new owner or lessee will take with the land so acquired or leased, such proportion of the entire grazing privileges as the grazing capacity in animal unit months of the tract conveyed or leased bears to the original area to which a grazing privilege was appurtenant and recognized. Conveyance or lease of all such base lands will automatically convey all grazing privileges appurtenant thereto.
(vi) Grazing privileges which are appurtenant to base lands located either inside or outside the park shall not be conveyed separately therefrom.
(2) Where no reasonable ingress or egress is available to permittees or nonpermittees who must cross Park lands to reach grazing allotments on non-Federal lands within the exterior boundary of the Park or adjacent thereto, the Superintendent will grant, upon request a temporary nonfee annual permit to herd stock on a designated driveway which shall specify the time to be consumed in each single drive. The breach of any of the terms or conditions of the permit shall be grounds for termination, suspension, or reduction of these privileges.
(3) Grazing preferences are based on actual use during the period March 15, 1938 through September 14, 1950 and no increase in the number of animals or animal unit months will be allowed on Federal lands in the park.
(4)
(i) A permittee whose grazing privilege is appurtenant to privately owned lands within the park will be granted total nonuse or reduced benefits for one or more years without nullifying his privilege in subsequent years.
(ii) A permittee whose privilege is appurtenant to base lands outside the park may be granted total nonuse on a year to year basis not to exceed three consecutive years. Total nonuse beyond this time may be granted if necessitated for reasons clearly outside the control of the permittee. Total unauthorized nonuse beyond three consecutive years will result in the termination and loss of all grazing privileges.
(iii) Whenever partial or total non-use is desired, an application must be made in writing to the Superintendent.
(5) Grazing fees shall be the same as those approved for the Teton National Forest and will be adjusted accordingly.
(6) Permittees or nonpermittees who have stock on Federal lands within the park at any time or place, when or where herding or grazing is unauthorized may be assessed fifty cents per day per animal as damages.
(7) The Superintendent may accept a written relinquishment or waiver of any privileges; however, no such relinquishment or waiver will be effective without the written consent of the owner or owners of the base lands.
(8) Permits. Terms and conditions. The issuance and continued effectiveness of all permits will be subject, in addition to mandatory provisions required by Executive Order or law, to the following terms and conditions:
(i) The permittee and his employees shall use all possible care in preventing forest and range fires, and shall assist in the extinguishing of forest and range fires on, or within, the vicinity of the land described in the permit, as well as in the preservation of good order within the boundaries of the park.
(ii) The Superintendent may require the permittee before driving livestock to or from the grazing allotment to gather his livestock at a designated time and place for the purpose of counting the same.
(iii) Stock will be allowed to graze only on the allotment designated in the permit.
(iv) The permittee shall file with the Superintendent a copy of his stock brand or other mark.
(v) The permittee shall, upon notice from the Superintendent that the allotment designated in the permit is not ready to be grazed at the beginning of the designated grazing season, place no livestock on the allotment for such a period as may be determined by the Superintendent as necessary to avoid damage to the range. All, or a portion of the livestock shall be removed from the area before the expiration of the designated grazing season if the Superintendent determines further grazing would be detrimental to the range. The number of stock and the grazing period may be adjusted by the Superintendent at any time when such action is deemed necessary for the protection of the range.
(vi) No permit shall be issued or renewed until payment of all fees and other amounts due the National Park Service has been made. Fees for permits are due the National Park Service and must be paid at least 15 days in advance of the grazing period. No permit shall be effective to authorize grazing use thereunder until all fees and other amounts due the National Park Service have been paid. A pro rata adjustment of fees will be made in the event of reduction of grazing privileges granted in the permit, except that not more than 50 percent of the total annual grazing fee will be refunded in the event reduced grazing benefits are taken at the election of the permittee after his stock are on the range.
(vii) No building or other structure shall be erected nor shall physical improvements of any kind be established under the permit except upon plans and specifications approved by the National Park Service. Any such facilities, structures, or buildings may be removed or disposed of to a successor permittee within three months following the termination of the permit; otherwise they shall become the property of the United States without compensation therefor.
(viii) The permittee shall utilize the lands covered by the permit in a manner approved and directed by the Superintendent which will prevent soil erosion thereon and on lands adjoining same.
(ix) The right is reserved to adjust the fees specified in the permit at any time to conform with the fees approved for Teton National Forest, and the permittee shall be furnished a notice of any change of fees.
(x) All livestock are considered as mature animals at six months of age and are so counted in determining animal unit months and numbers of animals.
(xi) The Superintendent may prescribe additional terms and conditions to meet individual cases.
(9) The breach of any of the terms or conditions of the permit shall be grounds for termination, suspension, or reduction of grazing privileges.
(10) Appeals from the decision of the Superintendent to the Regional Director and from the Regional Director to the Director shall be made in accordance with the National Park Service Order No. 14, as amended (19 FR 8824) and Regional Director, Order No. 3, as amended (21 FR 1494).
(11) Nothing in these regulations shall be construed as to prevent the enforcement of the provisions of the general rules and regulations and the special rules and regulations of the National Park Service or of any other provisions of said rules and regulations applicable to stock grazing.
(d) Camping.
(1) No person, party, or organization shall be permitted to camp more than 30 days in a calendar year in designated sites within the Park.
(2) Except in group campsites and backcountry sites, camping is limited to six persons to a site.
(3) Registration is required for camping at the Jenny Lake Campground; camping in this campground shall not exceed 10 days in any calendar year.
(e) Vessels.
(1) Power-driven vessels are prohibited on all park waters except Jackson Lake and Jenny Lake.
(2) On Jenny Lake:
(i) Operating a power-driven vessel using a motor exceeding 71/2 horsepower is prohibited, except:
(ii) An NPS authorized boating concessioner may operate power-driven vessels under conditions specified by the Superintendent.
(3) Hand-propelled vessels may be used on Jackson, Jenny, Phelps, Emma Matilda, Two Ocean, Taggart, Bradley, Bearpaw, Leigh, and String Lakes and on the Snake River, except within 1,000 feet of the downstream face of Jackson Lake Dam. All other waters are closed to boating.
(4) Sailboats may be used only on Jackson Lake.
(5) No person except an authorized concessioner shall moor or beach a vessel on the shore of a designated harbor area, except in an emergency.
(f) Management of elk. The laws and regulations of the State of Wyoming shall govern elk management as associated with formal reduction programs. Such Wyoming laws and regulations which are now or will hereafter be in effect are hereby incorporated by reference as a part of the regulations in this part.
(g)
(1) What is the scope of this section? The regulations contained in paragraphs (g)(2) through (g)(20) of this section are intended to apply to the use of snowcoaches and recreational snowmobiles. Except where indicated, paragraphs (g)(2) through (g)(20) do not apply to non-administrative over-snow vehicle use by NPS, contractor, or concessioner employees, or other non-recreational users authorized by the Superintendent.
(2) What terms do I need to know? The definitions in this paragraph (g)(2) also apply to non-administrative oversnow vehicle use by NPS, contractor, or concessioner employees, or other non-recreational users authorized by the Superintendent.
(i) Commercial guide means a guide who operates as a snowmobile or snowcoach guide for a fee or compensation and is authorized to operate in the park under a concession contract. In this section, “guide” also means “commercial guide.”
(ii) Historic snowcoach means a Bombardier snowcoach manufactured in 1983 or earlier. Any other snowcoach is considered a non-historic snowcoach.
(iii) Oversnow route means that portion of the unplowed roadway located between the road shoulders and designated by snow poles or other poles, ropes, fencing, or signs erected to regulate oversnow activity. Oversnow routes include pullouts or parking areas that are groomed or marked similarly to roadways and are adjacent to designated oversnow routes. An oversnow route may also be distinguished by the interior boundaries of the berm created by the packing and grooming of the unplowed roadway. The only motorized vehicles permitted on oversnow routes are oversnow vehicles.
(iv) Oversnow vehicle means a snowmobile, snowcoach, or other motorized vehicle that is intended for travel primarily on snow and has been authorized by the Superintendent to operate in the park. An oversnow vehicle that does not meet the definition of a snowcoach must comply with all requirements applicable to snowmobiles.
(v) Snowcoach means a self-propelled mass transit vehicle intended for travel on snow, having a curb weight of over 1,000 pounds (450 kilograms), driven by a track or tracks and steered by skis or tracks, and having a capacity of at least 8 passengers. A snowcoach has a maximum size of 102 inches wide, plus tracks (not to exceed 110 inches overall); a maximum length of 35 feet; and a Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) not exceeding 25,000 pounds.
(vi) Snowmobile means a self-propelled vehicle intended for travel on snow, with a curb weight of not more than 1,000 pounds (450 kg), driven by a track or tracks in contact with the snow, and which may be steered by a ski or skis in contact with the snow.
(vii) Snowplane means a self-propelled vehicle intended for oversnow travel and driven by an air-displacing propeller.
(3) May I operate a snowmobile in Grand Teton National Park? You may operate a snowmobile in Grand Teton National Park in compliance with use limits, operating hours and dates, equipment, and operating conditions established under this section. The Superintendent may establish additional operating conditions and provide notice of those conditions in accordance with § 1.7(a) of this chapter or in the Federal Register.
(4) May I operate a snowcoach in Grand Teton National Park? It is prohibited to operate a snowcoach in Grand Teton National Park except as authorized by the Superintendent.
(5) Must I operate a certain model of snowmobile in the park? Only commercially available snowmobiles that meet NPS air and sound emissions requirements as set forth in this section may be operated in the park. The Superintendent will approve snowmobile makes, models, and years of manufacture that meet those requirements. Any snowmobile model not approved by the Superintendent may not be operated in the park.
(6) How will the Superintendent approve snowmobile makes, models, and years of manufacture for use in Grand Teton National Park?
(i) Beginning with the 2005 model year, all snowmobiles must be certified under 40 CFR Part 1051, to a Family Emission Limit no greater than 15 g/kW-hr for hydrocarbons and to a Family Emission Limit no greater than 120 g/kW-hr for carbon monoxide.
(A) 2004 model year snowmobiles may use measured air emissions levels (official emission results with no deterioration factors applied) to comply with the air emission limits specified in paragraph (g)(6)(i) of this section.
(B) Snowmobiles manufactured before the 2004 model year may be operated only if they have shown to have air emissions no greater than the requirements identified in paragraph (g)(6)(i) of this section.
(C) The snowmobile test procedures specified by EPA (40 CFR parts 1051 and 1065) must be used to measure air emissions from model year 2004 and later snowmobiles. Equivalent procedures may be used for earlier model years.
(ii) For sound emissions, snowmobiles must operate at or below 73 dBA as measured at full throttle according to Society of Automotive Engineers J192 test procedures (revised 1985). Snowmobiles may be tested at any barometric pressure equal to or above 23.4 inches Hg uncorrected. The Superintendent may revise these testing procedures based on new information and/or updates to the SAE J192 testing procedures.
(iii) Snowmobiles meeting the requirements for air and sound emissions may be operated in the park for a period not exceeding 6 years from the date upon which first certified, except that snowmobiles being operated on Jackson Lake may continue to be operated up to 10 years, provided that these snowmobiles' mileage does not exceed 6,000 miles.
(iv) Snowmobiles will be exempt from these air and sound emissions requirements while in use to access lands authorized by paragraphs (g)(16) and (g)(18) of this section.
(v) The Superintendent may prohibit entry into the park of any snowmobile that has been modified in a manner that may adversely affect air or sound emissions.
(7) Where may I operate my snowmobile in the park?
(i) You may operate your snowmobile upon the frozen water surface of Jackson Lake, a route established in accordance with § 2.18(c) of this chapter, under the following conditions:
(A) You are ice fishing, and licensed or otherwise permitted to fish in Wyoming;
(B) You possess the proper fishing gear; and
(C) You limit your snowmobile travel to a direct route to and from and between fishing locations on the lake.
(ii) The Superintendent may open or close this route, or portions thereof, for snowmobile travel, and may establish separate zones for motorized and non-motorized uses on Jackson Lake, after taking into consideration the location of wintering wildlife, appropriate snow cover, public safety and other factors. The Superintendent will provide notice of such opening or closing by one or more of the methods listed in § 1.7(a) of this chapter.
(iii) This paragraph (g)(7) also applies to non-administrative over-snow vehicle use by NPS, contractor, or concessioner employees, or other non-recreational users authorized by the Superintendent.
(iv) Maps detailing the designated oversnow route will be available from Park Headquarters.
(8) Must I travel with a commercial guide while snowmobiling in Grand Teton National Park? You are not required to use a guide while snowmobiling in Grand Teton National Park.
(9) Are there limits established for the number of snowmobiles permitted to operate in the park each day?
(i) The number of snowmobiles allowed to operate in the park each day on Jackson Lake is 25.
(ii) The Superintendent may adjust this number up or down, not to exceed a daily limit of 40 snowmobiles, after taking into consideration the location of wintering wildlife, appropriate snow cover, noise monitoring results, public safety and other factors. The Superintendent will provide notice of such adjustment by one or more of the methods listed in § 1.7(a) of this chapter.
(10) When may I operate my snowmobile? The Superintendent will determine operating hours and dates. Except for emergency situations, any changes to operating hours or dates will be made on an annual basis, and the public will be notified of those changes through one or more of the methods listed in § 1.7(a) of this chapter.
(11) What other conditions apply to the operation of oversnow vehicles?
(i) The following are prohibited:
(A) Idling an oversnow vehicle more than 5 minutes at any one time.
(B) Driving an oversnow vehicle while the operator's motor vehicle license or privilege is suspended or revoked.
(C) Allowing or permitting an unlicensed driver to operate an oversnow vehicle.
(D) Driving an oversnow vehicle in willful or wanton disregard for the safety of persons, property, or park resources or otherwise in a reckless manner.
(E) Operating an oversnow vehicle without a lighted white headlamp and red taillight.
(F) Operating an oversnow vehicle that does not have brakes in good working order.
(G) The towing of persons on skis, sleds or other sliding devices by oversnow vehicles.
(ii) The following are required:
(A) All oversnow vehicles that stop on designated routes must pull over to the far right and next to the snow berm. Pullouts must be used where available and accessible. Oversnow vehicles may not be stopped in a hazardous location or where the view might be obscured, or operated so slowly as to interfere with the normal flow of traffic.
(B) Oversnow vehicle drivers must possess a valid motor vehicle driver's license. A learner's permit does not satisfy this requirement. The license must be carried by the driver at all times.
(C) Equipment sleds towed by a snowmobile must be pulled behind the snowmobile and fastened to the snowmobile with a rigid hitching mechanism.
(D) Snowmobiles must be properly registered and display a valid registration from the United States or Canada.
(iii) The Superintendent may impose other terms and conditions as necessary to protect park resources, visitors, or employees. The Superintendent will notify the public of any changes through one or more methods listed in § 1.7(a) of this chapter.
(iv) This paragraph (g)(11) also applies to non-administrative over-snow vehicle use by NPS, contractor, or concessioner employees, or other non-recreational users authorized by the Superintendent.
(12) What conditions apply to alcohol use while operating an oversnow vehicle? In addition to 36 CFR 4.23, the following conditions apply:
(i) Operating or being in actual physical control of an oversnow vehicle is prohibited when the driver is under 21 years of age and the alcohol concentration in the driver's blood or breath is 0.02 grams or more of alcohol per 100 milliliters or blood or 0.02 grams or more of alcohol per 210 liters of breath.
(ii) Operating or being in actual physical control of an oversnow vehicle is prohibited when the driver is a snowmobile guide or a snowcoach operator and the alcohol concentration in the driver's blood or breath is 0.04 grams or more of alcohol per 100 milliliters of blood or 0.04 grams or more of alcohol per 210 liters of breath.
(iii) This paragraph (g)(12) also applies to non-administrative over-snow vehicle use by NPS, contractor, or concessioner employees, or other non-recreational users authorized by the Superintendent.
(13) Do other NPS regulations apply to the use of oversnow vehicles? The use of oversnow vehicles in Grand Teton is subject to § 2.18(a), (b), and (c), but not subject to § 2.18(d) and (e) and § 2.19(b) of this chapter.
(14) Are there any forms of non-motorized oversnow transportation allowed in the park?
(i) Non-motorized travel consisting of skiing, skating, snowshoeing, or walking is permitted unless otherwise restricted under this section or other NPS regulations.
(ii) The Superintendent may designate areas of the park as closed, reopen such areas, or establish terms and conditions for non-motorized travel within the park in order to protect visitors, employees, or park resources.
(iii) Dog sledding and ski-joring are prohibited.
(15) May I operate a snowplane in the park? The operation of a snowplane in Grand Teton National Park is prohibited.
(16) May I continue to access public lands via snowmobile through the park? Reasonable and direct access, via snowmobile, to adjacent public lands will continue to be permitted on the designated routes through the park identified in the following paragraphs (g)(16)(i) through (iv). Requirements established in this section related to air and sound emissions, daily entry limits, snowmobile operator age, guiding, and licensing do not apply on these oversnow routes. The following routes are designated for access via snowmobile to public lands:
(i) From the parking area at Shadow Mountain directly along the unplowed portion of the road to the east park boundary.
(ii) Along the unplowed portion of the Ditch Creek Road directly to the east park boundary.
(iii) The Continental Divide Snowmobile Trail (CDST) along U.S. 26/287 from the east park boundary to a point approximately 2 miles east of Moran Junction. If necessary for the proper administration of visitor use and resource protection, the Superintendent may extend this designated route to the Moran Entrance Station.
(iv) The Superintendent may designate additional routes if necessary to provide access to other adjacent public lands.
(17) For what purpose may I use the routes designated in paragraph (g)(16) of this section? You may only use those routes designated in paragraph (g)(16) of this section to gain direct access to public lands adjacent to the park boundary.
(18) May I continue to access private property within or adjacent to the park via snowmobile? The Superintendent may establish reasonable and direct snowmobile access routes to the inholding or to private property adjacent to park boundaries for which other routes or means of access are not reasonably available. Requirements established in this section related to air and sound emissions, snowmobile operator age, licensing, and guiding do not apply on these oversnow routes. The following routes are designated for access to private properties within or adjacent to the park:
(i) From the Antelope Flats Road off U.S. 26/89/191 to private lands in the Craighead Subdivision.
(ii) The unplowed portion of the Teton Park Road to the piece of land commonly referred to as the “Townsend Property.”
(iii) From the Moose-Wilson Road to the land commonly referred to as the “Barker Property.”
(iv) From the Moose-Wilson Road to the property commonly referred to as the “Halpin Property.”
(v) From Highway 26/89/191 to those lands commonly referred to as the “Meadows”, the “Circle EW Ranch”, the “Moulton Property”, the “Levinson Property” and the “Macmahon Property.”
(vi) From Cunningham Cabin pullout on U.S. 26/89/191 near Triangle X to the piece of land commonly referred to as the “Lost Creek Ranch.”
(vii) The Superintendent may designate additional routes if necessary to provide reasonable access to inholdings or adjacent private property.
(viii) Maps detailing designated routes will be available from Park Headquarters.
(19) For what purpose may I use the routes designated in paragraph (g)(18) of this section? The routes designated in paragraph (g)(18) of this section are only to access private property within or directly adjacent to the park boundary. Use of these roads via snowmobile is authorized only for the landowners and their representatives or guests. Use of these roads by anyone else or for any other purpose is prohibited.
(20) Is violating any of the provisions of this section prohibited (i) Violating any of the terms, conditions or requirements of paragraphs (g)(3) through (g)(19) of this section is prohibited.
(ii) Anyone who violates any of the terms, conditions or requirements of this regulation will be considered to have committed one separate offense for each term, condition or requirement that they violate.
(h) Where may I ride a bicycle in Grand Teton National Park?
(1) You may ride a bicycle on park roads, in parking areas, and upon designated routes established within the park in accordance with § 4.30(a) of this chapter. The following routes are designated for bicycle use:
(i) The paved multi-use pathway alongside Dornan Road between Dornan's and the Teton Park Road.
(ii) The paved multi-use pathway alongside the Teton Park Road between Dornan Road (Dornan's Junction) and the South Jenny Lake developed area.
(2) The Superintendent may open or close designated routes, or portions thereof, or impose conditions or restrictions for bicycle use after taking into consideration the location of or impacts on wildlife, the amount of snow cover or other environmental conditions, public safety, and other factors, under the criteria and procedures of §§ 1.5 and 1.7 of this chapter.
[24 FR 11043, Dec. 30, 1959]
Editorial Note:
For Federal Register citations affecting § 7.22, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.fdsys.gov.

Title 36 published on 2013-07-01

The following are only the Rules published in the Federal Register after the published date of Title 36.

For a complete list of all Rules, Proposed Rules, and Notices view the Rulemaking tab.

  • 2014-03-21; vol. 79 # 55 - Friday, March 21, 2014
    1. 79 FR 15694 - Special Regulations, Areas of the National Park System, Lake Meredith National Recreation Area, Bicycling
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, National Park Service
      Final rule.
      The rule is effective April 21, 2014.
      36 CFR Part 7

Title 36 published on 2013-07-01

The following are ALL rules, proposed rules, and notices (chronologically) published in the Federal Register relating to 36 CFR 7 after this date.

  • 2014-04-18; vol. 79 # 75 - Friday, April 18, 2014
    1. 79 FR 21876 - Areas of the National Park System; General Provisions, Resource Protection, Public Use and Recreation, Pets and Service Animals; Special Regulations of the National Park System, Olympic National Park, Isle Royale National Park
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      DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, National Park Service
      Proposed rule.
      Comments must be received by June 17, 2014.
      36 CFR Parts 1, 2, and 7