39 CFR 3002.3 - Official seal.

§ 3002.3 Official seal.
(a) Authority. The Seal described in this section is hereby established as the official seal of the Postal Regulatory Commission.
(b) Description.
(1) On a gold color (yellow) pentagon device, the base-line formed as a “V,” edged with a black border, a black triangle point down and between the inscription at top “Postal Regulatory Commission” in white letters and in base at the point of the triangle three Celeste mullets two, two and one, the American Eagle with branch and arrows derived from the Great Seal of the United States charged on the breast with the Commission's earlier round seal inscribed “Postal Regulatory Commission” and the date “2006”, all in gold (yellow).
(2) The official seal of the Postal Regulatory Commission is modified when reproduced in black and white and when embossed, as it appears in thissection.
(c) Custody and authorization to affix.
(1) The seal is the official emblem of the Postal Regulatory Commission and its use is permitted only as provided in this part.
(2) The seal shall be kept in the custody of the Secretary and is to be used to authenticate records of the Postal Regulatory Commission and for other official purposes.
(3) Use by any person or organization outside of the Commission may be made only with the Commission's prior written approval. Such request must be made in writing to the Secretary.

Title 39 published on 2013-07-01

no entries appear in the Federal Register after this date.

This is a list of United States Code sections, Statutes at Large, Public Laws, and Presidential Documents, which provide rulemaking authority for this CFR Part.

This list is taken from the Parallel Table of Authorities and Rules provided by GPO [Government Printing Office].

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United States Code
U.S. Code: Title 5 - GOVERNMENT ORGANIZATION AND EMPLOYEES
U.S. Code: Title 39 - POSTAL SERVICE