40 CFR 11.4 - Definitions.

§ 11.4 Definitions.
(a) Classified information. Official information which has been assigned a security classification category in the interest of the national defense or foreign relations of the United States.
(b) Classified material. Any document, apparatus, model, film, recording, or any other physical object from which classified information can be derived by study, analysis, observation, or use of the material involved.
(c) Marking. The act of physically indicating the classification assignment on classified material.
(d) National security information. As used in this order this term is synonymous with “classified information.” It is any information which must be protected against unauthorized disclosure in the interest of the national defense or foreign relations of the United States.
(e) Security classification assignment. The prescription of a specific security classification for a particular area or item of information. The information involved constitutes the sole basis for determining the degree of classification assigned.
(f) Security classification category. The specific degree of classification (Top Secret, Secret or Confidential) assigned to classified information to indicate the degree of protection required.
(1) Top Secret. Top Secret refers to national security information or material which requires the highest degree of protection. The test for assigning Top Secret classification shall be whether its unauthorized disclosure could reasonably be expected to cause exceptionally grave damage to the national security. Examples of “exceptionally grave damage” include armed hostilities against the United States or its allies; disruption of foreign relations vitally affecting the national security; the compromise of vital national defense plans or complex cryptologic and communications intelligence systems; the revelation of sensitive intelligence operations; and the disclosure of scientific or technological developments vital to national security. This classification shall be used with the utmost restraint.
(2) Secret. Secret refers to that national security information or material which requires a substantial degree of protection. The test for assigning Secret classification shall be whether its unauthorized disclosure could reasonably be expected to cause serious damage to the national security. Examples of “serious damage” include disruption of foreign relations significantly affecting the national security; significant impairment of a program or policy directly related to the national security; revelation of significant military plans or intelligence operations; and compromise of scientific or technological developments relating to national security. The classification Secret shall be sparingly used.
(3) Confidential. Confidential refers to that national security information or material which requires protection. The test for assigning Confidential classification shall be whether its unauthorized disclosure could reasonably be expected to cause damage to the national security.

Title 40 published on 2013-07-01

no entries appear in the Federal Register after this date.

This is a list of United States Code sections, Statutes at Large, Public Laws, and Presidential Documents, which provide rulemaking authority for this CFR Part.

This list is taken from the Parallel Table of Authorities and Rules provided by GPO [Government Printing Office].

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Presidential Documents

Directive ... May 17, 1972

Executive Order ... 11652