40 CFR 131.35 - Colville Confederated Tribes Indian Reservation.

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§ 131.35 Colville Confederated Tribes Indian Reservation.
The water quality standards applicable to the waters within the Colville Indian Reservation, located in the State of Washington.
(a) Background.
(1) It is the purpose of these Federal water quality standards to prescribe minimum water quality requirements for the surface waters located within the exterior boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation to ensure compliance with section 303(c) of the Clean Water Act.
(2) The Colville Confederated Tribes have a primary interest in the protection, control, conservation, and utilization of the water resources of the Colville Indian Reservation. Water quality standards have been enacted into tribal law by the Colville Business Council of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, as the Colville Water Quality Standards Act, CTC Title 33 (Resolution No. 1984-526 (August 6, 1984) as amended by Resolution No. 1985-20 (January 18, 1985)).
(b) Territory covered. The provisions of these water quality standards shall apply to all surface waters within the exterior boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation.
(c) Applicability, Administration and Amendment.
(1) The water quality standards in this section shall be used by the Regional Administrator for establishing any water quality based National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit (NPDES) for point sources on the Colville Confederated Tribes Reservation.
(2) In conjunction with the issuance of section 402 or section 404 permits, the Regional Administrator may designate mixing zones in the waters of the United States on the reservation on a case-by-case basis. The size of such mixing zones and the in-zone water quality in such mixing zones shall be consistent with the applicable procedures and guidelines in EPA's Water Quality Standards Handbook and the Technical Support Document for Water Quality Based Toxics Control.
(3) Amendments to the section at the request of the Tribe shall proceed in the following manner.
(i) The requested amendment shall first be duly approved by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (and so certified by the Tribes Legal Counsel) and submitted to the Regional Administrator.
(ii) The requested amendment shall be reviewed by EPA (and by the State of Washington, if the action would affect a boundary water).
(iii) If deemed in compliance with the Clean Water Act, EPA will propose and promulgate an appropriate change to this section.
(4) Amendment of this section at EPA's initiative will follow consultation with the Tribe and other appropriate entities. Such amendments will then follow normal EPA rulemaking procedures.
(5) All other applicable provisions of this part 131 shall apply on the Colville Confederated Tribes Reservation. Special attention should be paid to §§ 131.6, 131.10, 131.11 and 131.20 for any amendment to these standards to be initiated by the Tribe.
(6) All numeric criteria contained in this section apply at all in-stream flow rates greater than or equal to the flow rate calculated as the minimum 7-consecutive day average flow with a recurrence frequency of once in ten years (7Q10); narrative criteria (§ 131.35(e)(3)) apply regardless of flow. The 7Q10 low flow shall be calculated using methods recommended by the U.S. Geological Survey.
(d) Definitions.
(1) Acute toxicity means a deleterious response (e.g., mortality, disorientation, immobilization) to a stimulus observed in 96 hours or less.
(2) Background conditions means the biological, chemical, and physical conditions of a water body, upstream from the point or non-point source discharge under consideration. Background sampling location in an enforcement action will be upstream from the point of discharge, but not upstream from other inflows. If several discharges to any water body exist, and an enforcement action is being taken for possible violations to the standards, background sampling will be undertaken immediately upstream from each discharge.
(3) Ceremonial and Religious water use means activities involving traditional Native American spiritual practices which involve, among other things, primary (direct) contact with water.
(4) Chronic toxicity means the lowest concentration of a constituent causing observable effects (i.e., considering lethality, growth, reduced reproduction, etc.) over a relatively long period of time, usually a 28-day test period for small fish test species.
(5) Council or Tribal Council means the Colville Business Council of the Colville Confederated Tribes.
(6) Geometric mean means the nth root of a product of n factors.
(7) Mean retention time means the time obtained by dividing a reservoir's mean annual minimum total storage by the non-zero 30-day, ten-year low-flow from the reservoir.
(8) Mixing zone or dilution zone means a limited area or volume of water where initial dilution of a discharge takes place; and where numeric water quality criteria can be exceeded but acutely toxic conditions are prevented from occurring.
(9) pH means the negative logarithm of the hydrogen ion concentration.
(10) Primary contact recreation means activities where a person would have direct contact with water to the point of complete submergence, including but not limited to skin diving, swimming, and water skiing.
(11) Regional Administrator means the Administrator of EPA's Region X.
(12) Reservation means all land within the limits of the Colville Indian Reservation, established on July 2, 1872 by Executive Order, presently containing 1,389,000 acres more or less, and under the jurisdiction of the United States government, notwithstanding the issuance of any patent, and including rights-of-way running through the reservation.
(13) Secondary contact recreation means activities where a person's water contact would be limited to the extent that bacterial infections of eyes, ears, respiratory, or digestive systems or urogenital areas would normally be avoided (such as wading or fishing).
(14) Surface water means all water above the surface of the ground within the exterior boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation including but not limited to lakes, ponds, reservoirs, artificial impoundments, streams, rivers, springs, seeps and wetlands.
(15) Temperature means water temperature expressed in Centigrade degrees (C).
(16) Total dissolved solids (TDS) means the total filterable residue that passes through a standard glass fiber filter disk and remains after evaporation and drying to a constant weight at 180 degrees C. it is considered to be a measure of the dissolved salt content of the water.
(17) Toxicity means acute and/or chronic toxicity.
(18) Tribe or Tribes means the Colville Confederated Tribes.
(19) Turbidity means the clarity of water expressed as nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) and measured with a calibrated turbidimeter.
(20) Wildlife habitat means the waters and surrounding land areas of the Reservation used by fish, other aquatic life and wildlife at any stage of their life history or activity.
(e) General considerations. The following general guidelines shall apply to the water quality standards and classifications set forth in the use designation Sections.
(1) Classification boundaries. At the boundary between waters of different classifications, the water quality standards for the higher classification shall prevail.
(2) Antidegradation policy. This antidegradation policy shall be applicable to all surface waters of the Reservation.
(i) Existing in-stream water uses and the level of water quality necessary to protect the existing uses shall be maintained and protected.
(ii) Where the quality of the waters exceeds levels necessary to support propagation of fish, shellfish, and wildlife and recreation in and on the water, that quality shall be maintained and protected unless the Regional Administrator finds, after full satisfaction of the inter-governmental coordination and public participation provisions of the Tribes' continuing planning process, that allowing lower water quality is necessary to accommodate important economic or social development in the area in which the waters are located. In allowing such degradation or lower water quality, the Regional Administrator shall assure water quality adequate to protect existing uses fully. Further, the Regional Administrator shall assure that there shall be achieved the highest statutory and regulatory requirements for all new and existing point sources and all cost-effective and reasonable best management practices for nonpoint source control.
(iii) Where high quality waters are identified as constituting an outstanding national or reservation resource, such as waters within areas designated as unique water quality management areas and waters otherwise of exceptional recreational or ecological significance, and are designated as special resource waters, that water quality shall be maintained and protected.
(iv) In those cases where potential water quality impairment associated with a thermal discharge is involved, this antidegradation policy's implementing method shall be consistent with section 316 of the Clean Water Act.
(3) Aesthetic qualities. All waters within the Reservation, including those within mixing zones, shall be free from substances, attributable to wastewater discharges or other pollutant sources, that:
(i) Settle to form objectionable deposits;
(ii) Float as debris, scum, oil, or other matter forming nuisances;
(iii) Produce objectionable color, odor, taste, or turbidity;
(iv) Cause injury to, are toxic to, or produce adverse physiological responses in humans, animals, or plants; or
(v) produce undesirable or nuisance aquatic life.
(4) Analytical methods.
(i) The analytical testing methods used to measure or otherwise evaluate compliance with water quality standards shall to the extent practicable, be in accordance with the “Guidelines Establishing Test Procedures for the Analysis of Pollutants” (40 CFR part 136). When a testing method is not available for a particular substance, the most recent edition of “Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater” (published by the American Public Health Association, American Water Works Association, and the Water Pollution Control Federation) and other or superseding methods published and/or approved by EPA shall be used.
(f) General water use and criteria classes. The following criteria shall apply to the various classes of surface waters on the Colville Indian Reservation:
(1) Class I (Extraordinary)—
(i) Designated uses. The designated uses include, but are not limited to, the following:
(A) Water supply (domestic, industrial, agricultural).
(B) Stock watering.
(C) Fish and shellfish: Salmonid migration, rearing, spawning, and harvesting; other fish migration, rearing, spawning, and harvesting.
(D) Wildlife habitat.
(E) Ceremonial and religious water use.
(F) Recreation (primary contact recreation, sport fishing, boating and aesthetic enjoyment).
(G) Commerce and navigation.
(ii) Water quality criteria.
(A) Bacteriological Criteria. The geometric mean of the enterococci bacteria densities in samples taken over a 30 day period shall not exceed 8 per 100 milliliters, nor shall any single sample exceed an enterococci density of 35 per 100 milliliters. These limits are calculated as the geometric mean of the collected samples approximately equally spaced over a thirty day period.
(B) Dissolved oxygen—The dissolved oxygen shall exceed 9.5 mg/l.
(C) Total dissolved gas—concentrations shall not exceed 110 percent of the saturation value for gases at the existing atmospheric and hydrostatic pressures at any point of sample collection.
(D) Temperature—shall not exceed 16.0 degrees C due to human activities. Temperature increases shall not, at any time, exceed t=23/(T 5).
(1) When natural conditions exceed 16.0 degrees C, no temperature increase will be allowed which will raise the receiving water by greater than 0.3 degrees C.
(2) For purposes hereof, “t” represents the permissive temperature change across the dilution zone; and “T” represents the highest existing temperature in this water classification outside of any dilution zone.
(3) Provided that temperature increase resulting from nonpoint source activities shall not exceed 2.8 degrees C, and the maximum water temperature shall not exceed 10.3 degrees C.
(E) pH shall be within the range of 6.5 to 8.5 with a human-caused variation of less than 0.2 units.
(F) Turbidity shall not exceed 5 NTU over background turbidity when the background turbidity is 50 NTU or less, or have more than a 10 percent increase in turbidity when the background turbidity is more than 50 NTU.
(G) Toxic, radioactive, nonconventional, or deleterious material concentrations shall be less than those of public health significance, or which may cause acute or chronic toxic conditions to the aquatic biota, or which may adversely affect designated water uses.
(2) Class II (Excellent)—
(i) Designated uses. The designated uses include but are not limited to, the following:
(A) Water supply (domestic, industrial, agricultural).
(B) Stock watering.
(C) Fish and shellfish: Salmonid migration, rearing, spawning, and harvesting; other fish migration, rearing, spawning, and harvesting; crayfish rearing, spawning, and harvesting.
(D) Wildlife habitat.
(E) Ceremonial and religious water use.
(F) Recreation (primary contact recreation, sport fishing, boating and aesthetic enjoyment).
(G) Commerce and navigation.
(ii) Water quality criteria.
(A) Bacteriological Criteria—The geometric mean of the enterococci bacteria densities in samples taken over a 30 day period shall not exceed 16/100 ml, nor shall any single sample exceed an enterococci density of 75 per 100 milliliters. These limits are calculated as the geometric mean of the collected samples approximately equally spaced over a thirty day period.
(B) Dissolved oxygen—The dissolved oxygen shall exceed 8.0 mg/l.
(C) Total dissolved gas—concentrations shall not exceed 110 percent of the saturation value for gases at the existing atmospheric and hydrostatic pressures at any point of sample collection.
(D) Temperature-shall not exceed 18.0 degrees C due to human activities. Temperature increases shall not, at any time, exceed t=28/(T 7).
(1) When natural conditions exceed 18 degrees C no temperature increase will be allowed which will raise the receiving water temperature by greater than 0.3 degrees C.
(2) For purposes hereof, “t” represents the permissive temperature change across the dilution zone; and “T” represents the highest existing temperature in this water classification outside of any dilution zone.
(3) Provided that temperature increase resulting from non-point source activities shall not exceed 2.8 degrees C, and the maximum water temperature shall not exceed 18.3 degrees C.
(E) pH shall be within the range of 6.5 to 8.5 with a human-caused variation of less than 0.5 units.
(F) Turbidity shall not exceed 5 NTU over background turbidity when the background turbidity is 50 NTU or less, or have more than a 10 percent increase in turbidity when the background turbidity is more than 50 NTU.
(G) Toxic, radioactive, nonconventional, or deleterious material concentrations shall be less than those of public health significance, or which may cause acute or chronic toxic conditions to the aquatic biota, or which may adversely affect designated water uses.
(3) Class III (Good)—
(i) Designated uses. The designated uses include but are not limited to, the following:
(A) Water supply (industrial, agricultural).
(B) Stock watering.
(C) Fish and shellfish: Salmonid migration, rearing, spawning, and harvesting; other fish migration, rearing, spawning, and harvesting; crayfish rearing, spawning, and harvesting.
(D) Wildlife habitat.
(E) Recreation (secondary contact recreation, sport fishing, boating and aesthetic enjoyment).
(F) Commerce and navigation.
(ii) Water quality criteria.
(A) Bacteriological Criteria—The geometric mean of the enterococci bacteria densities in samples taken over a 30 day period shall not exceed 33/100 ml, nor shall any single sample exceed an enterococci density of 150 per 100 milliliters. These limits are calculated as the geometric mean of the collected samples approximately equally spaced over a thirty day period.
(B) Dissolved oxygen.
Early life stages 1,2 Other life stages
1 These are water column concentrations recommended to achieve the required intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations shown in parentheses. The 3 mg/L differential is discussed in the dissolved oxygen criteria document (EPA 440/5-86-003, April 1986). For species that have early life stages exposed directly to the water column, the figures in parentheses apply.
2 Includes all embryonic and larval stages and all juvenile forms to 30-days following hatching.
3 NA (not applicable)
4 All minima should be considered as instantaneous concentrations to be achieved at all times.
7 day mean 9.5 (6.5) 3 NA
1 day minimum 4 8.0 (5.0) 6.5
(C) Total dissolved gas concentrations shall not exceed 110 percent of the saturation value for gases at the existing atmospheric and hydrostatic pressures at any point of sample collection.
(D) Temperature shall not exceed 21.0 degrees C due to human activities. Temperature increases shall not, at any time, exceed t=34/(T 9).
(1) When natural conditions exceed 21.0 degrees C no temperature increase will be allowed which will raise the receiving water temperature by greater than 0.3 degrees C.
(2) For purposes hereof, “t” represents the permissive temperature change across the dilution zone; and “T” represents the highest existing temperature in this water classification outside of any dilution zone.
(3) Provided that temperature increase resulting from nonpoint source activities shall not exceed 2.8 degrees C, and the maximum water temperature shall not exceed 21.3 degrees C.
(E) pH shall be within the range of 6.5 to 8.5 with a human-caused variation of less than 0.5 units.
(F) Turbidity shall not exceed 10 NTU over background turbidity when the background turbidity is 50 NTU or less, or have more than a 20 percent increase in turbidity when the background turbidity is more than 50 NTU.
(G) Toxic, radioactive, nonconventional, or deleterious material concentrations shall be less than those of public health significance, or which may cause acute or chronic toxic conditions to the aquatic biota, or which may adversely affect designated water uses.
(4) Class IV (Fair)—
(i) Designated uses. The designated uses include but are not limited to, the following:
(A) Water supply (industrial).
(B) Stock watering.
(C) Fish (salmonid and other fish migration).
(D) Recreation (secondary contact recreation, sport fishing, boating and aesthetic enjoyment).
(E) Commerce and navigation.
(ii) Water quality criteria.
(A) Dissolved oxygen.
During periods of salmonid and other fish migration During all other time periods
1 NA (not applicable).
2 All minima should be considered as instantaneous concentrations to be achieved at all times.
30 day mean 6.5 5.5
7 day mean 1 NA 1 NA
7 day mean minimum 5.0 4.0
1 day minimum 2 4.0 3.0
(B) Total dissolved gas—concentrations shall not exceed 110 percent of the saturation value for gases at the existing atmospheric and hydrostatic pressures at any point of sample collection.
(C) Temperature shall not exceed 22.0 degrees C due to human activities. Temperature increases shall not, at any time, exceed t=20/(T 2).
(1) When natural conditions exceed 22.0 degrees C, no temperature increase will be allowed which will raise the receiving water temperature by greater than 0.3 degrees C.
(2) For purposes hereof, “t” represents the permissive temperature change across the dilution zone; and “T” represents the highest existing temperature in this water classification outside of any dilution zone.
(D) pH shall be within the range of 6.5 to 9.0 with a human-caused variation of less than 0.5 units.
(E) Turbidity shall not exceed 10 NTU over background turbidity when the background turbidity is 50 NTU or less, or have more than a 20 percent increase in turbidity when the background turbidity is more than 50 NTU.
(F) Toxic, radioactive, nonconventional, or deleterious material concentrations shall be less than those of public health significance, or which may cause acute or chronic toxic conditions to the aquatic biota, or which may adversely affect designated water uses.
(5) Lake Class—
(i) Designated uses. The designated uses include but are not limited to, the following:
(A) Water supply (domestic, industrial, agricultural).
(B) Stock watering.
(C) Fish and shellfish: Salmonid migration, rearing, spawning, and harvesting; other fish migration, rearing, spawning, and harvesting; crayfish rearing, spawning, and harvesting.
(D) Wildlife habitat.
(E) Ceremonial and religious water use.
(F) Recreation (primary contact recreation, sport fishing, boating and aesthetic enjoyment).
(G) Commerce and navigation.
(ii) Water quality criteria.
(A) Bacteriological Criteria. The geometric mean of the enterococci bacteria densities in samples taken over a 30 day period shall not exceed 33/100 ml, nor shall any single sample exceed an enterococci density of 150 per 100 milliliters. These limits are calculated as the geometric mean of the collected samples approximately equally spaced over a thirty day period.
(B) Dissolved oxygen—no measurable decrease from natural conditions.
(C) Total dissolved gas concentrations shall not exceed 110 percent of the saturation value for gases at the existing atmospheric and hydrostatic pressures at any point of sample collection.
(D) Temperature—no measurable change from natural conditions.
(E) pH—no measurable change from natural conditions.
(F) Turbidity shall not exceed 5 NTU over natural conditions.
(G) Toxic, radioactive, nonconventional, or deleterious material concentrations shall be less than those which may affect public health, the natural aquatic environment, or the desirability of the water for any use.
(6) Special Resource Water Class (SRW)—
(i) General characteristics. These are fresh or saline waters which comprise a special and unique resource to the Reservation. Water quality of this class will be varied and unique as determined by the Regional Administrator in cooperation with the Tribes.
(ii) Designated uses. The designated uses include, but are not limited to, the following:
(A) Wildlife habitat.
(B) Natural foodchain maintenance.
(iii) Water quality criteria.
(A) Enterococci bacteria densities shall not exceed natural conditions.
(B) Dissolved oxygen—shall not show any measurable decrease from natural conditions.
(C) Total dissolved gas shall not vary from natural conditions.
(D) Temperature—shall not show any measurable change from natural conditions.
(E) pH shall not show any measurable change from natural conditions.
(F) Settleable solids shall not show any change from natural conditions.
(G) Turbidity shall not exceed 5 NTU over natural conditions.
(H) Toxic, radioactive, or deleterious material concentrations shall not exceed those found under natural conditions.
(g) General classifications. General classifications applying to various surface waterbodies not specifically classified under § 131.35(h) are as follows:
(1) All surface waters that are tributaries to Class I waters are classified Class I, unless otherwise classified.
(2) Except for those specifically classified otherwise, all lakes with existing average concentrations less than 2000 mg/L TDS and their feeder streams on the Colville Indian Reservation are classified as Lake Class and Class I, respectively.
(3) All lakes on the Colville Indian Reservation with existing average concentrations of TDS equal to or exceeding 2000 mg/L and their feeder streams are classified as Lake Class and Class I respectively unless specifically classified otherwise.
(4) All reservoirs with a mean detention time of greater than 15 days are classified Lake Class.
(5) All reservoirs with a mean detention time of 15 days or less are classified the same as the river section in which they are located.
(6) All reservoirs established on pre-existing lakes are classified as Lake Class.
(7) All wetlands are assigned to the Special Resource Water Class.
(8) All other waters not specifically assigned to a classification of the reservation are classified as Class II.
(h) Specific classifications. Specific classifications for surface waters of the Colville Indian Reservation are as follows:
(1) Streams:
Alice Creek Class III
Anderson Creek Class III
Armstrong Creek Class III
Barnaby Creek Class II
Bear Creek Class III
Beaver Dam Creek Class II
Bridge Creek Class II
Brush Creek Class III
Buckhorn Creek Class III
Cache Creek Class III
Canteen Creek Class I
Capoose Creek Class III
Cobbs Creek Class III
Columbia River from Chief Joseph Dam to Wells Dam
Columbia River from northern Reservation boundary to Grand Coulee Dam (Roosevelt Lake)
Columbia River from Grand Coulee Dam to Chief Joseph Dam
Cook Creek Class I
Cooper Creek Class III
Cornstalk Creek Class III
Cougar Creek Class I
Coyote Creek Class II
Deerhorn Creek Class III
Dick Creek Class III
Dry Creek Class I
Empire Creek Class III
Faye Creek Class I
Forty Mile Creek Class III
Gibson Creek Class I
Gold Creek Class II
Granite Creek Class II
Grizzly Creek Class III
Haley Creek Class III
Hall Creek Class II
Hall Creek, West Fork Class I
Iron Creek Class III
Jack Creek Class III
Jerred Creek Class I
Joe Moses Creek Class III
John Tom Creek Class III
Jones Creek Class I
Kartar Creek Class III
Kincaid Creek Class III
King Creek Class III
Klondyke Creek Class I
Lime Creek Class III
Little Jim Creek Class III
Little Nespelem Class II
Louie Creek Class III
Lynx Creek Class II
Manila Creek Class III
McAllister Creek Class III
Meadow Creek Class III
Mill Creek Class II
Mission Creek Class III
Nespelem River Class II
Nez Perce Creek Class III
Nine Mile Creek Class II
Nineteen Mile Creek Class III
No Name Creek Class II
North Nanamkin Creek Class III
North Star Creek Class III
Okanogan River from Reservation north boundary to Columbia River Class II
Olds Creek Class I
Omak Creek Class II
Onion Creek Class II
Parmenter Creek Class III
Peel Creek Class III
Peter Dan Creek Class III
Rock Creek Class I
San Poil River Class I
Sanpoil, River West Fork Class II
Seventeen Mile Creek Class III
Silver Creek Class III
Sitdown Creek Class III
Six Mile Creek Class III
South Nanamkin Creek Class III
Spring Creek Class III
Stapaloop Creek Class III
Stepstone Creek Class III
Stranger Creek Class II
Strawberry Creek Class III
Swimptkin Creek Class III
Three Forks Creek Class I
Three Mile Creek Class III
Thirteen Mile Creek Class II
Thirty Mile Creek Class II
Trail Creek Class III
Twentyfive Mile Creek Class III
Twentyone Mile Creek Class III
Twentythree Mile Creek Class III
Wannacot Creek Class III
Wells Creek Class I
Whitelaw Creek Class III
Wilmont Creek Class II
(2) Lakes:
Apex Lake LC
Big Goose Lake LC
Bourgeau Lake LC
Buffalo Lake LC
Cody Lake LC
Crawfish Lakes LC
Camille Lake LC
Elbow Lake LC
Fish Lake LC
Gold Lake LC
Great Western Lake LC
Johnson Lake LC
LaFleur Lake LC
Little Goose Lake LC
Little Owhi Lake LC
McGinnis Lake LC
Nicholas Lake LC
Omak Lake SRW
Owhi Lake SRW
Penley Lake SRW
Rebecca Lake LC
Round Lake LC
Simpson Lake LC
Soap Lake LC
Sugar Lake LC
Summit Lake LC
Twin Lakes SRW
[54 FR 28625, July 6, 1989]

Title 40 published on 2014-07-01

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  • 2014-09-25; vol. 79 # 186 - Thursday, September 25, 2014
    1. 79 FR 57447 - Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Withdrawal
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      ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
      Final rule.
      This final rule is effective on October 27, 2014.
      40 CFR Part 131

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United States Code
U.S. Code: Title 33 - NAVIGATION AND NAVIGABLE WATERS

Title 40 published on 2014-07-01

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  • 2014-09-25; vol. 79 # 186 - Thursday, September 25, 2014
    1. 79 FR 57447 - Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Withdrawal
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
      Final rule.
      This final rule is effective on October 27, 2014.
      40 CFR Part 131