40 CFR 63.2406 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

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§ 63.2406 What definitions apply to this subpart?
Terms used in this subpart are defined in the CAA, in § 63.2, 40 CFR part 63, subparts H, PP, SS, TT, UU, and WW, and in this section. If the same term is defined in another subpart and in this section, it will have the meaning given in this section for purposes of this subpart. Notwithstanding the introductory language in § 63.921, the terms “container” and “safety device” shall have the meaning found in this subpart and not in § 63.921.
Actual annual average temperature, for organic liquids, means the temperature determined using the following methods:
(1) For heated or cooled storage tanks, use the calculated annual average temperature of the stored organic liquid as determined from a design analysis of the storage tank.
(2) For ambient temperature storage tanks:
(i) Use the annual average of the local (nearest) normal daily mean temperatures reported by the National Climatic Data Center; or
(ii) Use any other method that the EPA approves.
Annual average true vapor pressure means the equilibrium partial pressure exerted by the total table 1 organic HAP in the stored or transferred organic liquid. For the purpose of determining if a liquid meets the definition of an organic liquid, the vapor pressure is determined using standard conditions of 77 degrees F and 29.92 inches of mercury. For the purpose of determining whether an organic liquid meets the applicability criteria in table 2, items 1 through 6, to this subpart, use the actual annual average temperature as defined in this subpart. The vapor pressure value in either of these cases is determined:
(1) In accordance with methods described in American Petroleum Institute Publication 2517, Evaporative Loss from External Floating-Roof Tanks (incorporated by reference, see § 63.14);
(2) Using standard reference texts;
(3) By the American Society for Testing and Materials Method D2879-83, 96 (incorporated by reference, see § 63.14); or
(4) Using any other method that the EPA approves.
Bottoms receiver means a tank that collects distillation bottoms before the stream is sent for storage or for further processing downstream.
Cargo tank means a liquid-carrying tank permanently attached and forming an integral part of a motor vehicle or truck trailer. This term also refers to the entire cargo tank motor vehicle or trailer. For the purpose of this subpart, vacuum trucks used exclusively for maintenance or spill response are not considered cargo tanks.
Closed vent system means a system that is not open to the atmosphere and is composed of piping, ductwork, connections, and, if necessary, flow-inducing devices that transport gas or vapors from an emission point to a control device. This system does not include the vapor collection system that is part of some transport vehicles or the loading arm or hose that is used for vapor return. For transfer racks, the closed vent system begins at, and includes, the first block valve on the downstream side of the loading arm or hose used to convey displaced vapors.
Combustion device means an individual unit of equipment, such as a flare, oxidizer, catalytic oxidizer, process heater, or boiler, used for the combustion of organic emissions.
Container means a portable unit in which a material can be stored, transported, treated, disposed of, or otherwise handled. Examples of containers include, but are not limited to, drums and portable cargo containers known as “portable tanks” or “totes.”
Control device means any combustion device, recovery device, recapture device, or any combination of these devices used to comply with this subpart. Such equipment or devices include, but are not limited to, absorbers, adsorbers, condensers, and combustion devices. Primary condensers, steam strippers, and fuel gas systems are not considered control devices.
Crude oil means any of the naturally occurring liquids commonly referred to as crude oil, regardless of specific physical properties. Only those crude oils downstream of the first point of custody transfer after the production field are considered crude oils in this subpart.
Custody transfer means the transfer of hydrocarbon liquids after processing and/or treatment in the producing operations, or from storage tanks or automatic transfer facilities to pipelines or any other forms of transportation.
Design evaluation means a procedure for evaluating control devices that complies with the requirements in § 63.985(b)(1)(i).
Deviation means any instance in which an affected source subject to this subpart, or portion thereof, or an owner or operator of such a source:
(1) Fails to meet any requirement or obligation established by this subpart including, but not limited to, any emission limitation (including any operating limit) or work practice standard;
(2) Fails to meet any term or condition that is adopted to implement an applicable requirement in this subpart, and that is included in the operating permit for any affected source required to obtain such a permit; or
(3) Fails to meet any emission limitation (including any operating limit) or work practice standard in this subpart during SSM.
Emission limitation means an emission limit, opacity limit, operating limit, or visible emission limit.
Equipment leak component means each pump, valve, and sampling connection system used in organic liquids service at an OLD operation. Valve types include control, globe, gate, plug, and ball. Relief and check valves are excluded.
Gasoline means any petroleum distillate or petroleum distillate/alcohol blend having a Reid vapor pressure of 27.6 kilopascals (4.0 pounds per square inch absolute (psia)) or greater which is used as a fuel for internal combustion engines. Aviation gasoline is included in this definition.
High throughput transfer rack means those transfer racks that transfer into transport vehicles (for existing affected sources) or into transport vehicles and containers (for new affected sources) a total of 11.8 million liters per year or greater of organic liquids.
In organic liquids service means that an equipment leak component contains or contacts organic liquids having 5 percent by weight or greater of the organic HAP listed in Table 1 to this subpart.
Low throughput transfer rack means those transfer racks that transfer into transport vehicles (for existing affected sources) or into transport vehicles and containers (for new affected sources) less than 11.8 million liters per year of organic liquids.
On-site or on site means, with respect to records required to be maintained by this subpart or required by another subpart referenced by this subpart, that records are stored at a location within a major source which encompasses the affected source. On-site includes, but is not limited to, storage at the affected source to which the records pertain, storage in central files elsewhere at the major source, or electronically available at the site.
Organic liquid means:
(1) Any non-crude oil liquid or liquid mixture that contains 5 percent by weight or greater of the organic HAP listed in Table 1 to this subpart, as determined using the procedures specified in § 63.2354(c).
(2) Any crude oils downstream of the first point of custody transfer.
(3) Organic liquids for purposes of this subpart do not include the following liquids:
(i) Gasoline (including aviation gasoline), kerosene (No. 1 distillate oil), diesel (No. 2 distillate oil), asphalt, and heavier distillate oils and fuel oils;
(ii) Any fuel consumed or dispensed on the plant site directly to users (such as fuels for fleet refueling or for refueling marine vessels that support the operation of the plant);
(iii) Hazardous waste;
(iv) Wastewater;
(v) Ballast water: or
(vi) Any non-crude oil liquid with an annual average true vapor pressure less than 0.7 kilopascals (0.1 psia).
Organic liquids distribution (OLD) operation means the combination of activities and equipment used to store or transfer organic liquids into, out of, or within a plant site regardless of the specific activity being performed. Activities include, but are not limited to, storage, transfer, blending, compounding, and packaging.
Permitting authority means one of the following:
(1) The State Air Pollution Control Agency, local agency, or other agency authorized by the EPA Administrator to carry out a permit program under 40 CFR part 70; or
(2) The EPA Administrator, in the case of EPA-implemented permit programs under title V of the CAA (42 U.S.C. 7661) and 40 CFR part 71.
Plant site means all contiguous or adjoining surface property that is under common control, including surface properties that are separated only by a road or other public right-of-way. Common control includes surface properties that are owned, leased, or operated by the same entity, parent entity, subsidiary, or any combination.
Research and development facility means laboratory and pilot plant operations whose primary purpose is to conduct research and development into new processes and products, where the operations are under the close supervision of technically trained personnel, and which are not engaged in the manufacture of products for commercial sale, except in a de minimis manner.
Responsible official means responsible official as defined in 40 CFR 70.2 and 40 CFR 71.2, as applicable.
Safety device means a closure device such as a pressure relief valve, frangible disc, fusible plug, or any other type of device that functions exclusively to prevent physical damage or permanent deformation to a unit or its air emission control equipment by venting gases or vapors directly to the atmosphere during unsafe conditions resulting from an unplanned, accidental, or emergency event.
Shutdown means the cessation of operation of an OLD affected source, or portion thereof (other than as part of normal operation of a batch-type operation), including equipment required or used to comply with this subpart, or the emptying and degassing of a storage tank. Shutdown as defined here includes, but is not limited to, events that result from periodic maintenance, replacement of equipment, or repair.
Startup means the setting in operation of an OLD affected source, or portion thereof (other than as part of normal operation of a batch-type operation), for any purpose. Startup also includes the placing in operation of any individual piece of equipment required or used to comply with this subpart including, but not limited to, control devices and monitors.
Storage tank means a stationary unit that is constructed primarily of nonearthen materials (such as wood, concrete, steel, or reinforced plastic) that provide structural support and is designed to hold a bulk quantity of liquid. Storage tanks do not include:
(1) Units permanently attached to conveyances such as trucks, trailers, rail cars, barges, or ships;
(2) Pressure vessels designed to operate in excess of 204.9 kilopascals and without emissions to the atmosphere;
(3) Bottoms receivers;
(4) Surge control vessels;
(5) Vessels storing wastewater; or
(6) Reactor vessels associated with a manufacturing process unit.
Surge control vessel means feed drums, recycle drums, and intermediate vessels. Surge control vessels are used within chemical manufacturing processes when in-process storage, mixing, or management of flow rates or volumes is needed to assist in production of a product.
Tank car means a car designed to carry liquid freight by rail, and including a permanently attached tank.
Total actual annual facility-level organic liquid loading volume means the total facility-level actual volume of organic liquid loaded for transport within or out of the facility through transfer racks that are part of the affected source into transport vehicles (for existing affected sources) or into transport vehicles and containers (for new affected sources) based on a 3-year rolling average, calculated annually.
(1) For existing affected sources, each 3-year rolling average is based on actual facility-level loading volume during each calendar year (January 1 through December 31) in the 3-year period. For calendar year 2004 only (the first year of the initial 3-year rolling average), if an owner or operator of an affected source does not have actual loading volume data for the time period from January 1, 2004, through February 2, 2004 (the time period prior to the effective date of the OLD NESHAP), the owner or operator shall compute a facility-level loading volume for this time period as follows: At the end of the 2004 calendar year, the owner or operator shall calculate a daily average facility-level loading volume (based on the actual loading volume for February 3, 2004, through December 31, 2004) and use that daily average to estimate the facility-level loading volume for the period of time from January 1, 2004, through February 2, 2004. The owner or operator shall then sum the estimated facility-level loading volume from January 1, 2004, through February 2, 2004, and the actual facility-level loading volume from February 3, 2004, through December 31, 2004, to calculate the annual facility-level loading volume for calendar year 2004.
(2)
(i) For new affected sources, the 3-year rolling average is calculated as an average of three 12-month periods. An owner or operator must select as the beginning calculation date with which to start the calculations as either the initial startup date of the new affected source or the first day of the calendar month following the month in which startup occurs. Once selected, the date with which the calculations begin cannot be changed.
(ii) The initial 3-year rolling average is based on the projected maximum facility-level annual loading volume for each of the 3 years following the selected beginning calculation date. The second 3-year rolling average is based on actual facility-level loading volume for the first year of operation plus a new projected maximum facility-level annual loading volume for second and third years following the selected beginning calculation date. The third 3-year rolling average is based on actual facility-level loading volume for the first 2 years of operation plus a new projected maximum annual facility-level loading volume for the third year following the beginning calculation date. Subsequent 3-year rolling averages are based on actual facility-level loading volume for each year in the 3-year rolling average.
Transfer rack means a single system used to load organic liquids into, or unload organic liquids out of, transport vehicles or containers. It includes all loading and unloading arms, pumps, meters, shutoff valves, relief valves, and other piping and equipment necessary for the transfer operation. Transfer equipment and operations that are physically separate (i.e., do not share common piping, valves, and other equipment) are considered to be separate transfer racks.
Transport vehicle means a cargo tank or tank car.
Vapor balancing system means:
(1) A piping system that collects organic HAP vapors displaced from transport vehicles or containers during loading and routes the collected vapors to the storage tank from which the liquid being loaded originated or to another storage tank connected to a common header. For containers, the piping system must route the displaced vapors directly to the appropriate storage tank or to another storage tank connected to a common header in order to qualify as a vapor balancing system; or
(2) A piping system that collects organic HAP vapors displaced from the loading of a storage tank and routes the collected vapors to the transport vehicle from which the storage tank is filled.
Vapor collection system means any equipment located at the source (i.e., at the OLD operation) that is not open to the atmosphere; that is composed of piping, connections, and, if necessary, flow-inducing devices; and that is used for:
(1) Containing and conveying vapors displaced during the loading of transport vehicles to a control device;
(2) Containing and directly conveying vapors displaced during the loading of containers; or
(3) Vapor balancing. This does not include any of the vapor collection equipment that is installed on the transport vehicle.
Vapor-tight transport vehicle means a transport vehicle that has been demonstrated to be vapor-tight. To be considered vapor-tight, a transport vehicle equipped with vapor collection equipment must undergo a pressure change of no more than 250 pascals (1 inch of water) within 5 minutes after it is pressurized to 4,500 pascals (18 inches of water). This capability must be demonstrated annually using the procedures specified in EPA Method 27 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A. For all other transport vehicles, vapor tightness is demonstrated by performing the U.S. DOT pressure test procedures for tank cars and cargo tanks.
Work practice standard means any design, equipment, work practice, or operational standard, or combination thereof, that is promulgated pursuant to section 112(h) of the CAA.
[69 FR 5063, Feb. 3, 2004, as amended at 71 FR 42911, July 28, 2006]

Title 40 published on 2013-07-01

The following are only the Rules published in the Federal Register after the published date of Title 40.

For a complete list of all Rules, Proposed Rules, and Notices view the Rulemaking tab.

  • 2014-02-27; vol. 79 # 39 - Thursday, February 27, 2014
    1. 79 FR 11228 - Revisions to Test Methods and Testing Regulations
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
      Final rule.
      This final rule is effective on February 27, 2014. The incorporation by reference materials listed in the rule are approved by the Director of the Federal Register as of February 27, 2014.
      40 CFR Parts 51, 60, 61, and 63

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United States Code

Title 40 published on 2013-07-01

The following are ALL rules, proposed rules, and notices (chronologically) published in the Federal Register relating to 40 CFR 63 after this date.

  • 2014-02-27; vol. 79 # 39 - Thursday, February 27, 2014
    1. 79 FR 11228 - Revisions to Test Methods and Testing Regulations
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
      Final rule.
      This final rule is effective on February 27, 2014. The incorporation by reference materials listed in the rule are approved by the Director of the Federal Register as of February 27, 2014.
      40 CFR Parts 51, 60, 61, and 63