40 CFR 63.6625 - What are my monitoring, installation, collection, operation, and maintenance requirements?

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There are 6 Updates appearing in the Federal Register for 40 CFR 63. View below or at eCFR (GPOAccess)
§ 63.6625 What are my monitoring, installation, collection, operation, and maintenance requirements?
(a) If you elect to install a CEMS as specified in Table 5 of this subpart, you must install, operate, and maintain a CEMS to monitor CO and either oxygen or CO2 at both the inlet and the outlet of the control device according to the requirements in paragraphs (a)(1) through (4) of this section.
(1) Each CEMS must be installed, operated, and maintained according to the applicable performance specifications of 40 CFR part 60, appendix B.
(2) You must conduct an initial performance evaluation and an annual relative accuracy test audit (RATA) of each CEMS according to the requirements in § 63.8 and according to the applicable performance specifications of 40 CFR part 60, appendix B as well as daily and periodic data quality checks in accordance with 40 CFR part 60, appendix F, procedure 1.
(3) As specified in § 63.8(c)(4)(ii), each CEMS must complete a minimum of one cycle of operation (sampling, analyzing, and data recording) for each successive 15-minute period. You must have at least two data points, with each representing a different 15-minute period, to have a valid hour of data.
(4) The CEMS data must be reduced as specified in § 63.8(g)(2) and recorded in parts per million or parts per billion (as appropriate for the applicable limitation) at 15 percent oxygen or the equivalent CO2 concentration.
(b) If you are required to install a continuous parameter monitoring system (CPMS) as specified in Table 5 of this subpart, you must install, operate, and maintain each CPMS according to the requirements in paragraphs (b)(1) through (5) of this section. For an affected source that is complying with the emission limitations and operating limitations on March 9, 2011, the requirements in paragraph (b) of this section are applicable September 6, 2011.
(1) You must prepare a site-specific monitoring plan that addresses the monitoring system design, data collection, and the quality assurance and quality control elements outlined in paragraphs (b)(1)(i) through (v) of this section and in § 63.8(d). As specified in § 63.8(f)(4), you may request approval of monitoring system quality assurance and quality control procedures alternative to those specified in paragraphs (b)(1) through (5) of this section in your site-specific monitoring plan.
(i) The performance criteria and design specifications for the monitoring system equipment, including the sample interface, detector signal analyzer, and data acquisition and calculations;
(ii) Sampling interface (e.g., thermocouple) location such that the monitoring system will provide representative measurements;
(iii) Equipment performance evaluations, system accuracy audits, or other audit procedures;
(iv) Ongoing operation and maintenance procedures in accordance with provisions in § 63.8(c)(1) and (c)(3); and
(v) Ongoing reporting and recordkeeping procedures in accordance with provisions in § 63.10(c), (e)(1), and (e)(2)(i).
(2) You must install, operate, and maintain each CPMS in continuous operation according to the procedures in your site-specific monitoring plan.
(3) The CPMS must collect data at least once every 15 minutes (see also § 63.6635).
(4) For a CPMS for measuring temperature range, the temperature sensor must have a minimum tolerance of 2.8 degrees Celsius (5 degrees Fahrenheit) or 1 percent of the measurement range, whichever is larger.
(5) You must conduct the CPMS equipment performance evaluation, system accuracy audits, or other audit procedures specified in your site-specific monitoring plan at least annually.
(6) You must conduct a performance evaluation of each CPMS in accordance with your site-specific monitoring plan.
(c) If you are operating a new or reconstructed stationary RICE which fires landfill gas or digester gas equivalent to 10 percent or more of the gross heat input on an annual basis, you must monitor and record your fuel usage daily with separate fuel meters to measure the volumetric flow rate of each fuel. In addition, you must operate your stationary RICE in a manner which reasonably minimizes HAP emissions.
(d) If you are operating a new or reconstructed emergency 4SLB stationary RICE with a site rating of greater than or equal to 250 and less than or equal to 500 brake HP located at a major source of HAP emissions, you must install a non-resettable hour meter prior to the startup of the engine.
(e) If you own or operate any of the following stationary RICE, you must operate and maintain the stationary RICE and after-treatment control device (if any) according to the manufacturer's emission-related written instructions or develop your own maintenance plan which must provide to the extent practicable for the maintenance and operation of the engine in a manner consistent with good air pollution control practice for minimizing emissions:
(1) An existing stationary RICE with a site rating of less than 100 HP located at a major source of HAP emissions;
(2) An existing emergency or black start stationary RICE with a site rating of less than or equal to 500 HP located at a major source of HAP emissions;
(3) An existing emergency or black start stationary RICE located at an area source of HAP emissions;
(4) An existing non-emergency, non-black start stationary CI RICE with a site rating less than or equal to 300 HP located at an area source of HAP emissions;
(5) An existing non-emergency, non-black start 2SLB stationary RICE located at an area source of HAP emissions;
(6) An existing non-emergency, non-black start landfill or digester gas stationary RICE located at an area source of HAP emissions;
(7) An existing non-emergency, non-black start 4SLB stationary RICE with a site rating less than or equal to 500 HP located at an area source of HAP emissions;
(8) An existing non-emergency, non-black start 4SRB stationary RICE with a site rating less than or equal to 500 HP located at an area source of HAP emissions;
(9) An existing, non-emergency, non-black start 4SLB stationary RICE with a site rating greater than 500 HP located at an area source of HAP emissions that is operated 24 hours or less per calendar year; and
(10) An existing, non-emergency, non-black start 4SRB stationary RICE with a site rating greater than 500 HP located at an area source of HAP emissions that is operated 24 hours or less per calendar year.
(f) If you own or operate an existing emergency stationary RICE with a site rating of less than or equal to 500 brake HP located at a major source of HAP emissions or an existing emergency stationary RICE located at an area source of HAP emissions, you must install a non-resettable hour meter if one is not already installed.
(g) If you own or operate an existing non-emergency, non-black start CI engine greater than or equal to 300 HP that is not equipped with a closed crankcase ventilation system, you must comply with either paragraph (g)(1) or paragraph (g)(2) of this section. Owners and operators must follow the manufacturer's specified maintenance requirements for operating and maintaining the open or closed crankcase ventilation systems and replacing the crankcase filters, or can request the Administrator to approve different maintenance requirements that are as protective as manufacturer requirements. Existing CI engines located at area sources in areas of Alaska not accessible by the FAHS do not have to meet the requirements of paragraph (g) of this section.
(1) Install a closed crankcase ventilation system that prevents crankcase emissions from being emitted to the atmosphere, or
(2) Install an open crankcase filtration emission control system that reduces emissions from the crankcase by filtering the exhaust stream to remove oil mist, particulates, and metals.
(h) If you operate a new, reconstructed, or existing stationary engine, you must minimize the engine's time spent at idle during startup and minimize the engine's startup time to a period needed for appropriate and safe loading of the engine, not to exceed 30 minutes, after which time the emission standards applicable to all times other than startup in Tables 1a, 2a, 2c, and 2d to this subpart apply.
(i) If you own or operate a stationary CI engine that is subject to the work, operation or management practices in items 1 or 2 of Table 2c to this subpart or in items 1 or 4 of Table 2d to this subpart, you have the option of utilizing an oil analysis program in order to extend the specified oil change requirement in Tables 2c and 2d to this subpart. The oil analysis must be performed at the same frequency specified for changing the oil in Table 2c or 2d to this subpart. The analysis program must at a minimum analyze the following three parameters: Total Base Number, viscosity, and percent water content. The condemning limits for these parameters are as follows: Total Base Number is less than 30 percent of the Total Base Number of the oil when new; viscosity of the oil has changed by more than 20 percent from the viscosity of the oil when new; or percent water content (by volume) is greater than 0.5. If all of these condemning limits are not exceeded, the engine owner or operator is not required to change the oil. If any of the limits are exceeded, the engine owner or operator must change the oil within 2 days of receiving the results of the analysis; if the engine is not in operation when the results of the analysis are received, the engine owner or operator must change the oil within 2 days or before commencing operation, whichever is later. The owner or operator must keep records of the parameters that are analyzed as part of the program, the results of the analysis, and the oil changes for the engine. The analysis program must be part of the maintenance plan for the engine.
(j) If you own or operate a stationary SI engine that is subject to the work, operation or management practices in items 6, 7, or 8 of Table 2c to this subpart or in items 5, 6, 7, 9, or 11 of Table 2d to this subpart, you have the option of utilizing an oil analysis program in order to extend the specified oil change requirement in Tables 2c and 2d to this subpart. The oil analysis must be performed at the same frequency specified for changing the oil in Table 2c or 2d to this subpart. The analysis program must at a minimum analyze the following three parameters: Total Acid Number, viscosity, and percent water content. The condemning limits for these parameters are as follows: Total Acid Number increases by more than 3.0 milligrams of potassium hydroxide (KOH) per gram from Total Acid Number of the oil when new; viscosity of the oil has changed by more than 20 percent from the viscosity of the oil when new; or percent water content (by volume) is greater than 0.5. If all of these condemning limits are not exceeded, the engine owner or operator is not required to change the oil. If any of the limits are exceeded, the engine owner or operator must change the oil within 2 days of receiving the results of the analysis; if the engine is not in operation when the results of the analysis are received, the engine owner or operator must change the oil within 2 days or before commencing operation, whichever is later. The owner or operator must keep records of the parameters that are analyzed as part of the program, the results of the analysis, and the oil changes for the engine. The analysis program must be part of the maintenance plan for the engine.
[69 FR 33506, June 15, 2004, as amended at 73 FR 3606, Jan. 18, 2008; 75 FR 9676, Mar. 3, 2010; 75 FR 51589, Aug. 20, 2010; 76 FR 12866, Mar. 9, 2011]

Title 40 published on 2013-07-01

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  • 2014-03-27; vol. 79 # 59 - Thursday, March 27, 2014
    1. 79 FR 17340 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins; Pesticide Active Ingredient Production; and Polyether Polyols Production
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      ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
      Final rule.
      This final action is effective on March 27, 2014. The incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in this final rule was approved by the Director of the Federal Register as of March 27, 2014.
      40 CFR Part 63

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United States Code

Title 40 published on 2013-07-01

The following are ALL rules, proposed rules, and notices (chronologically) published in the Federal Register relating to 40 CFR 63 after this date.

  • 2014-03-27; vol. 79 # 59 - Thursday, March 27, 2014
    1. 79 FR 17340 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins; Pesticide Active Ingredient Production; and Polyether Polyols Production
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
      Final rule.
      This final action is effective on March 27, 2014. The incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in this final rule was approved by the Director of the Federal Register as of March 27, 2014.
      40 CFR Part 63