40 CFR 65.2 - Definitions.

§ 65.2 Definitions.
All terms used in this part shall have the meaning given them in the Act and in this section. If a term is defined both in this section and in other parts that reference the use of this part, the term shall have the meaning given in this section for purposes of this part. If a term is not defined in the Act or in this section, the term shall have the meaning given in the referencing subpart for purposes of this part. The terms follow:
Act means the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.).
Administrator means the Administrator of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or his or her authorized representative (for example, a State that has been delegated the authority to implement the provisions of this part).
Approved permit program means a State permit program approved by the Administrator as meeting the requirements of part 70 of this chapter or a Federal permit program established in this chapter pursuant to title V of the Act (42 U.S.C. 7661).
Automated continuous parameter monitoring system means a continuous parameter monitoring system that automatically both records the measured data and calculates hourly averages.
Automated monitoring and recording system means any means of measuring values of monitored parameters and creating a hard copy or computer record of the measured values that does not require manual reading of monitoring instruments and manual transcription of data values. Automated monitoring and recording systems include, but are not limited to, computerized systems, strip charts, and circular charts.
Batch process means a process in which the equipment is fed intermittently or discontinuously. Processing then occurs in this equipment after which the equipment is generally emptied. Examples of industries that use batch processes include pharmaceutical production and pesticide production.
Batch product-process equipment train means the collection of equipment (for example, connectors, reactors, valves, pumps) configured to produce a specific product or intermediate by a batch process.
Boiler means any enclosed combustion device that extracts useful energy in the form of steam and is not an incinerator or a process heater. Boiler also means any industrial furnace as defined in 40 CFR 260.10.
Bottoms receiver means a tank that collects distillation bottoms before the stream is sent for storage or for further downstream processing.
By compound means by individual stream components, not carbon equivalents.
Car-seal means a seal that is placed on a device that is used to change the position of a valve (for example, from opened to closed) in such a way that the position of the valve cannot be changed without breaking the seal.
Closed vent system means a system that is not open to the atmosphere and is composed of piping, ductwork, connections, and, if necessary, flow inducing devices that transport gas or vapor from an emission point to a control device. A closed vent system does not include the vapor collection system that is part of any tank truck or railcar or the loading arm or hose that is used for vapor return. For transfer racks, the closed vent system begins at, and includes, the first block valve on the downstream side of the loading arm or hose used to convey displaced vapors.
Closed vent system shutdown means a work practice or operational procedure that stops production from a process unit or part of a process unit during which it is technically feasible to clear process material from a closed vent system or part of a closed vent system consistent with safety constraints and during which repairs can be effected. An unscheduled work practice or operational procedure that stops production from a process unit or part of a process unit for less than 24 hours is not a closed vent system shutdown. An unscheduled work practice or operational procedure that would stop production from a process unit or part of a process unit for a shorter period of time than would be required to clear the closed vent system or part of the closed vent system of materials and start up the unit, and would result in greater emissions than delay of repair of leaking components until the next scheduled closed vent system shutdown, is not a closed vent system shutdown. The use of spare equipment and technically feasible bypassing of equipment without stopping production are not closed vent system shutdowns.
Closed-loop system means an enclosed system that returns process fluid to a process.
Closed-purge system means a system or combination of systems and portable containers to capture purged liquids. Containers must be covered or closed when not being filled or emptied.
Combustion device means an individual unit of equipment, such as a flare, incinerator, process heater, or boiler, used for the combustion of organic emissions.
Compliance date means the date by which a regulated source is required to be in compliance with a relevant standard, limitation, prohibition, or any federally enforceable requirement established by the Administrator (or a State with an approved permit program) pursuant to the Act.
Connector means flanged, screwed, or other joined fittings used to connect two pipelines or a pipeline and a piece of equipment. A common connector is a flange. Joined fittings welded completely around the circumference of the interface are not considered connectors for the purpose of this regulation. For the purpose of reporting and recordkeeping, connector means joined fittings that are not inaccessible, ceramic, or ceramic-lined (for example, porcelain, glass, or glass-lined) as described in § 65.108(e)(2).
Continuous parameter monitoring system or CPMS means the total equipment that may be required to meet the data acquisition and availability requirements of this part used to sample, condition (if applicable), analyze, and provide a record of process or control system parameters.
Continuous record means documentation, either in hard copy or computer-readable form, of data values measured at least once every 15 minutes and recorded at the frequency specified in § 65.161(a).
Continuous seal means a seal that is designed to form a continuous closure that completely covers the space between the wall of the storage vessel and the edge of the floating roof. A continuous seal may be a vapor-mounted, liquid-mounted, or metallic shoe seal. A continuous seal may be constructed of fastened segments so as to form a continuous seal.
Control device means any combustion device, recovery device, or any combination of these devices used to comply with this part. Such equipment or devices include, but are not limited to, absorbers, carbon adsorbers, condensers, incinerators, flares, boilers, and process heaters. For process vents (as defined in this section), recovery devices are not considered control devices except for the recovery devices specified in § 65.63(a)(2)(ii). A fuel gas system is not a control device. For a steam stripper, a primary condenser is not considered a control device.
Control system means the combination of the closed vent system and the control devices used to collect and control vapors or gases from a regulated source.
Day means a calendar day.
Distance piece means an open or enclosed casing through which the piston rod travels, separating the compressor cylinder from the crankcase.
Double block and bleed system means two block valves connected in series with a bleed valve or line that can vent the line between the two block valves.
Ductwork means a conveyance system such as those commonly used for heating and ventilation systems. It is often made of sheet metal and often has sections connected by screws or crimping. Hard-piping is not ductwork.
Emission point means an individual process vent, storage vessel, transfer rack, wastewater stream, or equipment leak.
Empty or emptying means the removal of the stored liquid from a storage vessel. Storage vessels where stored liquid is left on the walls, as bottom clingage, or in pools due to bottom irregularities are considered empty. Lowering of the stored liquid level, so that the floating roof is resting on its legs, as necessitated by normal vessel operation (for example, when changing stored material or when transferring material out of the vessel for shipment) is not considered emptying.
Equipment means each of the following that is subject to control under the referencing subpart: pump, compressor, agitator, pressure relief device, sampling connection system, open-ended valve or line, valve, connector, and instrumentation system; and any control devices or systems used to comply with subpart F of this part.
Equivalent method means any method of sampling and analyzing for an air pollutant that has been demonstrated to the Administrator's satisfaction to have a consistent and quantitatively known relationship to the reference method under specified conditions.
External floating roof or EFR means a pontoon-type (noncontact) or double-deck-type (contact) roof that is designed to rest on the stored liquid surface in a storage vessel with no fixed roof.
Failure, EFR (referred to as EFR failure) is defined as any time the external floating roof's primary seal has holes, tears, or other openings in the shoe, seal fabric, or seal envelope; or the secondary seal has holes, tears, or other openings in the seal or the seal fabric; or the gaskets no longer close off the stored liquid surface from the atmosphere; or a slotted membrane has more than 10 percent open area.
Failure, internal floating roof type A (referred to as IFR type A failure) means any time, as determined during visual inspection through roof hatches, in which the internal floating roof is not resting on the surface of the stored liquid inside the storage vessel and is not resting on the leg supports; or there is stored liquid on the floating roof; or there are holes, tears, or other openings in the seal or seal fabric; or there are visible gaps between the seal and the wall of the storage vessel.
Failure, internal floating roof type B (referred to as IFR type B failure) means any time, as determined during internal inspections, the internal floating roof's primary seal has holes, tears, or other openings in the seal or the seal fabric; or the secondary seal (if one has been installed) has holes, tears, or other openings in the seal or the seal fabric; or the gaskets no longer close off the stored liquid surface from the atmosphere; or a slotted membrane has more than 10 percent open area.
Fill or filling means the introduction of liquids into a storage vessel, but not necessarily to complete capacity.
First attempt at repair, for the purposes of subparts F and G of this part, means to take action for the purpose of stopping or reducing leakage of organic material to the atmosphere, followed by monitoring as specified in §§ 65.104(b) and 65.143(c), as appropriate, to verify whether the leak is repaired, unless the owner or operator determines by other means that the leak is not repaired.
Fixed roof means a roof that is mounted (for example, permanently affixed) on a storage vessel in a stationary manner and that does not move with fluctuations in stored liquid level.
Flame zone means the portion of the combustion chamber in a boiler or process heater occupied by the flame envelope.
Floating roof means a roof consisting of an external floating roof or an internal floating roof that is designed to rest upon and is supported by the stored liquid and is equipped with a continuous seal.
Flow indicator means a device that indicates whether gas flow is present in a line, or whether the valve position would allow gas flow to be present in a line.
Force majeure means, for purposes of § 65.157, an event that will be or has been caused by circumstances beyond the control of the affected facility, its contractors, or any entity controlled by the affected facility that prevents the owner or operator from complying with the regulatory requirement to conduct performance tests within the specified timeframe despite the affected facility's best efforts to fulfill the obligation. Examples of such events are acts of nature, acts of war or terrorism, or equipment failure or safety hazard beyond the control of the affected facility.
Fuel gas means gases that are combusted to derive useful work or heat.
Fuel gas system means the offsite and onsite piping and flow and pressure control system that gathers gaseous stream(s) generated by onsite operations, may blend them with other sources of gas, and transports the gaseous stream for use as fuel gas in combustion devices or in-process combustion equipment, such as furnaces and gas turbines, either singly or in combination.
Group 1 process vent means a process vent for which the flow rate is greater than or equal to 0.011 standard cubic meter per minute (0.39 cubic feet per minute); the total concentration is greater than or equal to the appropriate value in table 1 of subpart D of this part, and the total resource effectiveness index value, calculated according to § 65.64(h) is less than or equal to 1.0.
Group 2A process vent means a process vent that is not Group 1 or Group 2B for which monitoring and recordkeeping are required to demonstrate a total resource effectiveness index value greater than 1.0.
Group 2B process vent means a process vent that is not Group 1 or Group 2A for which monitoring and recordkeeping are not required to demonstrate a total resource effectiveness index value greater than 4.0, or which is exempt from control requirements due to the vent stream's flow rate, regulated material concentration, or total resource effectiveness index value.
Halogenated vent stream or halogenated stream means, for purposes of this part, a vent stream determined to be halogenated by the procedures specified in § 65.85(c) for transfer racks and in § 65.64(g) for process vents, as applicable.
Halogens and hydrogen halides means hydrogen chloride (HCl), chlorine (Cl2), hydrogen bromide (HBr), bromine (Br2), and hydrogen fluoride (HF).
Hard-piping means pipe or tubing that is manufactured and installed using good engineering judgment and standards, such as ASME B31.3, Process Piping (available from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, PO Box 2900, Fairfield, NJ 07007-2900).
High-throughput transfer racks means those transfer racks that transfer greater than or equal to a total of 11.8 million liters per year (3.12 million gallons per year) of liquid containing regulated material.
In food/medical service means that a piece of equipment in regulated material service contacts a process stream used to manufacture a Food and Drug Administration-regulated product where leakage of a barrier fluid into the process stream would cause any of the following:
(1) A dilution of product quality so that the product would not meet written specifications;
(2) An exothermic reaction that is a safety hazard;
(3) The intended reaction to be slowed down or stopped; or
(4) An undesired side reaction to occur.
In gas/vapor service means that a piece of equipment in regulated material service contains a gas or vapor when in operation.
In heavy liquid service means that a piece of equipment in regulated material service is not in gas/vapor service or in light liquid service.
In light liquid service means that a piece of equipment in regulated material service contains a liquid that meets the following conditions:
(1) The vapor pressure of one or more of the organic compounds is greater than 0.3 kilopascals at 20 °C (0.04 pounds per square inch at 68 °F);
(2) The total concentration of the pure organic compound constituents having a vapor pressure greater than 0.3 kilopascals at 20 °C (0.04 pounds per square inch at 68 °F) is equal to or greater than 20 percent by weight of the total process stream; and
(3) The fluid is a liquid at operating conditions. (Note: Vapor pressures may be determined by standard reference texts or American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D-2879, available from American Society for Testing and Materials, 1916 Race Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103; or University Microfilms International, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.)
In liquid service means that a piece of equipment in regulated material service is not in gas/vapor service.
In regulated material service means, for the purposes of the equipment leak provisions of subpart F of this part, equipment which meets the definition of “in volatile organic compound service,” “in volatile hazardous air pollutant service,” “in benzene service,” “in vinyl chloride service,” or “in organic hazardous air pollutant service” as defined in the referencing subpart.
In vacuum service means that equipment is operating at an internal pressure that is at least 5 kilopascals (0.7 pounds per square inch) below ambient pressure.
In-situ sampling systems means nonextractive samplers or in-line samplers.
Incinerator means an enclosed combustion device that is used for destroying organic compounds. Auxiliary fuel may be used to heat waste gas to combustion temperatures. Any energy recovery section present is not physically formed into one manufactured or assembled unit with the combustion section; rather, the energy recovery section is a separate section following the combustion section and the two are joined by ducts or connections carrying flue gas. This energy recovery section limitation does not apply to an energy recovery section used solely to preheat the incoming vent stream or combustion air.
Initial startup means, for new or reconstructed sources, the first time the source begins production. For additions or changes not defined as a new source by an applicable referencing subpart, initial startup means the first time additional or changed equipment is put into operation. Initial startup does not include operation solely for testing equipment. Initial startup does not include subsequent startup (as defined in this section) of process units following malfunctions or process unit shutdowns. Except for equipment leaks, initial startup also does not include subsequent startups (as defined in this section) of process units following changes in product for flexible operation units or following recharging of equipment in batch operation.
Instrumentation system means a group of equipment components used to condition and convey a sample of the process fluid to analyzers and instruments for the purpose of determining process operating conditions (for example, composition, pressure, flow). Valves and connectors are the predominant type of equipment used in instrumentation systems; however, other types of equipment may also be included in these systems. Only valves nominally 0.5 inches and smaller in diameter and connectors nominally 0.75 inches and smaller in diameter are considered instrumentation systems for the purposes of subpart F of this part.
Intermediate change to monitoring means a modification to federally required monitoring involving “proven technology” (generally accepted by the scientific community as equivalent or better) that is applied on a site-specific basis and that may have the potential to decrease the stringency of the associated emission limitation or standard. Though site-specific, an intermediate change may set a national precedent for a source category and may ultimately result in a revision to the federally required monitoring. Examples of intermediate changes to monitoring include, but are not limited to:
(1) Use of a continuous monitoring system (CEMS) in lieu of a parameter monitoring approach;
(2) Decreased frequency for non-continuous parameter monitoring or physical inspections;
(3) Changes to quality control requirements for parameter monitoring; and
(4) Use of an electronic data reduction system in lieu of manual data reduction.
Intermediate change to test method means a within-method modification to a federally enforceable test method involving “proven technology” (generally accepted by the scientific community as equivalent or better) that is applied on a site-specific basis and that may have the potential to decrease the stringency of the associated emission limitation or standard. Though site-specific, an intermediate change may set a national precedent for a source category and may ultimately result in a revision to the federally enforceable test method. In order to be approved, an intermediate change must be validated according to EPA Method 301 (40 CFR part 63, appendix A) to demonstrate that it provides equal or improved accuracy or precision. Examples of intermediate changes to a test method include, but are not limited to:
(1) Modifications to a test method's sampling procedure including substitution of sampling equipment that has been demonstrated for a particular sample matrix; and use of a different impinger absorbing solution;
(2) Changes in sample recovery procedures and analytical techniques, such as changes to sample holding times and use of a different analytical finish with proven capability for the analyte of interest; and
(3) “Combining” a federally required method with another proven method for application to processes emitting multiple pollutants.
Internal floating roof or IFR means a pontoon-type (noncontact) or double-deck-type (contact) roof that is designed to rest or float on the stored liquid surface inside a storage vessel that has a fixed roof.
Liquid-mounted seal means a foam-or liquid-filled continuous seal mounted in contact with the stored liquid.
Liquids dripping means any visible leakage from a seal including dripping, spraying, misting, clouding, and ice formation. Indications of liquids dripping include puddling or new stains that are indicative of an existing evaporated drip.
Loading cycle means the time period from the beginning of filling a tank truck or railcar until flow to the control device ceases as determined by the flow indicator.
Low-throughput transfer racks means those transfer racks that transfer less than a total of 11.8 million liters per year (3.12 million gallons per year) of liquid containing regulated material.
Major change to monitoring means a modification to federally required monitoring that uses “unproven technology or procedures” (not generally accepted by the scientific community) or is an entirely new method (sometimes necessary when the required monitoring is unsuitable). A major change to monitoring may be site-specific or may apply to one or more source categories and will almost always set a national precedent. Examples of major changes to monitoring include, but are not limited to:
(1) Use of a new monitoring approach developed to apply to a control technology not contemplated in the applicable regulation in this part;
(2) Use of a predictive emission monitoring system (PEMS) in place of a required continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS);
(3) Use of alternative calibration procedures that do not involve calibration gases or test cells;
(4) Use of an analytical technology that differs from that specified by a performance specification;
(5) Decreased monitoring frequency for a continuous emission monitoring system, continuous opacity monitoring system, predictive emission monitoring system, or continuous parameter monitoring system;
(6) Decreased monitoring frequency for a leak detection and repair program; and
(7) Use of alternative averaging times for reporting purposes.
Major change to test method means a modification to a federally enforceable test method that uses “unproven technology or procedures” (not generally accepted by the scientific community) or is an entirely new method (sometimes necessary when the required test method is unsuitable). A major change to a test method may be site-specific or may apply to one or more source categories and will almost always set a national precedent. In order to be approved, a major change must be validated according to EPA Method 301 (40 CFR part 63, appendix A). Examples of major changes to a test method include, but are not limited to:
(1) Use of an unproven analytical finish;
(2) Use of a method developed to fill a test method gap;
(3) Use of a new test method developed to apply to a control technology not contemplated in the applicable regulation in this part; and
(4) Combining two or more sampling/analytical methods (at least one unproven) into one for application to processes emitting multiple pollutants.
Malfunction means any sudden, infrequent, and not reasonably preventable failure of air pollution control equipment, monitoring equipment, process equipment, or a process to operate in a normal or usual manner which causes, or has the potential to cause, the emission limitations in an applicable standard to be exceeded. Failures that are caused in part by poor maintenance or careless operation are not malfunctions. Malfunctions that do not affect a regulated source or compliance with this part are not malfunctions for purposes of this part.
Metallic shoe seal or mechanical shoe seal means metal sheets that are held vertically against the wall of the storage vessel by springs, weighted levers, or other mechanisms and connected to the floating roof by braces or other means. A flexible coated fabric (envelope) spans the annular space between the metal sheet and the floating roof.
Minor change to monitoring means:
(1) A modification to federally required monitoring that:
(i) Does not decrease the stringency of the compliance and enforcement measures of the relevant standard;
(ii) Has no national significance (e.g., does not affect implementation of the applicable regulation in this part for other affected sources, does not set a national precedent, and individually does not result in a revision to the monitoring requirements); and
(iii) Is site-specific, made to reflect or accommodate the operational characteristics, physical constraints, or safety concerns of an affected source.
(2) Examples of minor changes to monitoring include, but are not limited to:
(i) Modifications to a sampling procedure, such as use of an improved sample conditioning system to reduce maintenance requirements;
(ii) Increased monitoring frequency; and
(iii) Modification of the environmental shelter to moderate temperature fluctuation and thus protect the analytical instrumentation.
Minor change to test method means:
(1) A modification to a federally enforceable test method that:
(i) Does not decrease the stringency of the emission limitation or standard;
(ii) Has no national significance (e.g., does not affect implementation of the applicable regulation in this part for other affected sources, does not set a national precedent, and individually does not result in a revision to the test method); and
(iii) Is site-specific, made to reflect or accommodate the operational characteristics, physical constraints, or safety concerns of an affected source.
(2) Examples of minor changes to a test method include, but are not limited to:
(i) Field adjustments in a test method's sampling procedure, such as a modified sampling traverse or location to avoid interference from an obstruction in the stack, increasing the sampling time or volume, use of additional impingers for a high moisture situation, accepting particulate emission results for a test run that was conducted with a lower than specified temperature, substitution of a material in the sampling train that has been demonstrated to be more inert for the sample matrix; and
(ii) Changes in recovery and analytical techniques such as a change in quality control/quality assurance requirements needed to adjust for analysis of a certain sample matrix.
Nonautomated monitoring and recording system means manual reading of values measured by monitoring instruments and manual transcription of those values to create a record. Nonautomated systems do not include strip charts nor circular charts.
Nonrepairable means that it is technically infeasible to repair a piece of equipment from which a leak has been detected without a process unit shutdown.
One-hour period means the 60-minute period commencing on the hour.
Onsite or on-site means, with respect to records required to be maintained by this part, that the records are stored at a location within a plant site that encompasses the regulated source. Onsite includes, but is not limited to, storage at the regulated source to which the records pertain, or storage in central files elsewhere at the plant site.
Open-ended valve or line means any valve except relief valves having one side of the valve seat in contact with process fluid and one side open to the atmosphere, either directly or through open piping.
Organic monitoring device means a device used to indicate the concentration level of organic compounds based on a detection principle such as infrared, photo ionization, or thermal conductivity.
Owner or operator means any person who owns, leases, operates, controls, or supervises a regulated source or a stationary source of which a regulated source is a part.
Part 70 permit means any permit issued, renewed, or revised pursuant to part 70 of this chapter.
Performance test means the collection of data resulting from the execution of a test method (usually three emission test runs) used to demonstrate compliance with a relevant emission standard as specified in the performance test section of the relevant standard.
Permit program means a comprehensive State operating permit system established pursuant to title V of the Act (42 U.S.C. 7661) and regulations codified in part 70 of this chapter and applicable State regulations, or a comprehensive Federal operating permit system established pursuant to title V of the Act and regulations codified in part 71 of this chapter.
Permitting authority means one of the following:
(1) The State air pollution control agency, local agency, other State agency, or other agency authorized by the Administrator to carry out a permit program under part 70 of this chapter; or
(2) The Administrator, in the case of EPA-implemented permit programs under title V of the Act (42 U.S.C. 7661) and part 71 of this chapter.
Plant site means all contiguous or adjoining property that is under common control, including properties that are separated only by a road or other public right-of-way. Common control includes properties that are owned, leased, or operated by the same entity, parent entity, subsidiary, or any combination thereof.
Polymerizing monomer means, for the purposes of this part, a compound which may form polymer buildup in pump mechanical seals resulting in rapid mechanical seal failure.
Pressure release means the emission of materials resulting from the system pressure being greater than the set pressure of the relief device. This release can be one release or a series of releases over a short time period.
Pressure relief device or valve means a device used to prevent operating pressures from exceeding the maximum allowable working pressure of the process equipment. A common pressure relief device is a spring-loaded pressure relief valve. Devices that are actuated either by a pressure of less than or equal to 2.5 pounds per square inch gauge or by a vacuum are not pressure relief devices.
Primary fuel means the fuel that provides the principal heat input to the device. To be considered primary, the fuel must be able to sustain operation without the addition of other fuels.
Process heater means an enclosed combustion device that transfers heat liberated by burning fuel directly to process streams or to heat transfer liquids other than water. A process heater may, as a secondary function, heat water in unfired heat recovery sections.
Process unit means the equipment specified in the definitions of process unit or chemical manufacturing process unit in the applicable referencing subpart. If the referencing subpart does not define process unit, then, for the purposes of this part, process unit means the equipment assembled and connected by pipes or ducts to process raw materials and to manufacture an intended product.
Process unit shutdown means a work practice or operational procedure that stops production from a process unit or part of a process unit during which it is technically feasible to clear process material from a process unit or part of a process unit consistent with safety constraints and during which repairs can be effected. An unscheduled work practice or operational procedure that stops production from a process unit or part of a process unit for less than 24 hours is not a process unit shutdown. An unscheduled work practice or operational procedure that would stop production from a process unit or part of a process unit for a shorter period of time than would be required to clear the process unit or part of the process unit of materials and start up the unit, and would result in greater emissions than delay of repair of leaking components until the next scheduled process unit shutdown is not a process unit shutdown. The use of spare equipment and technically feasible bypassing of equipment without stopping production are not process unit shutdowns.
Process vent means a process vent or vent stream as they are defined in the referencing subpart.
Recovery device means an individual unit of equipment capable of and normally used for the purpose of recovering chemicals for fuel value (i.e., net positive heating value), use, reuse, or for sale for fuel value, use, or reuse. Equipment capable of and used for the purpose of recovering chemicals, but not normally for use, reuse or sale, are not recovery devices but are control devices. Examples of equipment that may be recovery devices include absorbers, carbon adsorbers, condensers, oil-water separators or organic-water separators, or organic removal devices such as decanters, strippers, or thin-film evaporation units.
Reference method means any method of sampling and analyzing for an air pollutant as specified in an applicable subpart, the appendices to 40 CFR part 60 or 63, or in appendix B of 40 CFR part 61.
Referencing subpart means 40 CFR part 60, subparts Ka, Kb, VV, DDD, III, NNN, and RRR; 40 CFR part 61, subparts V, Y, and BB; and 40 CFR part 63, subparts G and H.
Regulated material means, for the purposes of this part, the material regulated by the specific referencing subpart, including volatile organic liquids (VOL), volatile organic compounds (VOC), organic hazardous air pollutants (HAP's), benzene, vinyl chloride, or other chemicals or groups of chemicals.
Regulated source means, for the purposes of this part, the stationary source, the group of stationary sources, or the portion of a stationary source that is regulated by a relevant standard or other requirement established pursuant to this part, or 40 CFR part 60, 61, or 63.
Relief device or valve means a device or valve used only to release an unplanned, nonroutine discharge. A relief device or valve discharge can result from an operator error, a malfunction such as a power failure or equipment failure, or other unexpected cause that requires immediate venting of gas from process equipment in order to avoid safety hazards or equipment damage.
Repaired means, for the purposes of subparts F and G of this part, that equipment meets the following conditions:
(1) Is adjusted, or otherwise altered, to eliminate a leak as defined in the applicable section of this part; and
(2) Unless otherwise specified in applicable provisions of this part, is monitored as specified in §§ 65.104(b) and 65.143(c) to verify that emissions from the equipment are below the applicable leak definition.
Routed to a process or route to a process means the emissions are conveyed to any enclosed portion of a process unit where the emissions are predominantly recycled and/or consumed in the same manner as a material that fulfills the same function in the process and/or transformed by chemical reaction into materials that are not regulated materials and/or incorporated into a product; and/or recovered.
Run means one of a series of emission or other measurements needed to determine emissions for a representative operating period or cycle as specified in this part. Unless otherwise specified, a run may be either intermittent or continuous within the limits of good engineering practice.
Sampling connection system means an assembly of equipment within a process unit used during periods of representative operation to take samples of the process fluid. Equipment used to take nonroutine grab samples is not considered a sampling connection system.
Secondary fuel means a fuel fired through a burner other than the primary fuel burner that provides supplementary heat in addition to the heat provided by the primary fuel.
Sensor means a device that measures a physical quantity or the change in a physical quantity, such as temperature, pressure, flow rate, pH, or liquid level.
Set pressure means, for the purposes of subparts F and G of this part, the pressure at which a properly operating pressure relief device begins to open to relieve atypical process system operating pressure.
Shutdown means the cessation of operation of a regulated source (for example, chemical manufacturing process unit or a reactor, air oxidation reactor, distillation unit) and equipment required or used to comply with this part, or the emptying and degassing of a storage vessel. Shutdown is defined here for purposes including, but not limited to, periodic maintenance, replacement of equipment, or repair. Shutdown does not include the routine rinsing or washing of equipment in batch operation between batches.
Simultaneous loading means, for a shared control device, loading of regulated materials from more than one transfer arm at the same time so that the beginning and ending times of loading cycles coincide or overlap and there is no interruption in vapor flow to the shared control device.
Single-seal system means, for the purposes of subpart C of this part, a floating roof having one continuous seal. This seal may be a vapor-mounted, liquid-mounted, or metallic shoe seal.
Specific gravity monitoring device means a unit of equipment used to monitor specific gravity and having a minimum accuracy of ±0.02 specific gravity units.
Startup means the setting into operation of a regulated source (for example, chemical manufacturing process unit or a reactor, air oxidation reactor, distillation unit, a storage vessel after emptying and degassing) and/or equipment required or used to comply with this part. Startup includes initial startup, operation solely for testing equipment, the recharging of equipment in batch operation, and transitional conditions due to changes in product for flexible operation units.
State means all non-Federal authorities, including local agencies, interstate associations, and statewide programs, that have delegated authority to implement the provisions of this part; the referencing subparts; and/or the permit program established under part 70 of this chapter. The term State shall have its conventional meaning where clear from the context.
Steam jet ejector means a steam nozzle that discharges a high-velocity jet across a suction chamber that is connected to the equipment to be evacuated.
Stuffing box pressure means the fluid (liquid or gas) pressure inside the casing or housing of a piece of equipment, on the process side of the inboard seal.
Surge control vessel means feed drums, recycle drums, and intermediate vessels. Surge control vessels are used within a process unit (as defined in the specific subpart that references this part) when in-process storage, mixing, or management of flow rates or volumes is needed to assist in production of a product.
Temperature monitoring device means a unit of equipment used to monitor temperature and having a minimum accuracy of ±1 percent of the temperature being monitored expressed in degrees Celsius or ±1.2 degrees Celsius (°C), whichever is greater.
Title V permit means any permit issued, renewed, or revised pursuant to Federal or State regulations established under 40 CFR part 70 or 71 to implement title V of the Act (42 U.S.C. 7661).
Total organic compounds or TOC means those compounds measured according to the procedures specified in §§ 65.64(c) and 65.158(b)(3)(ii)(A), as applicable. Those compounds that the Administrator has determined do not contribute appreciably to the formation of ozone and that are specifically excluded from the definition of volatile organic compound at 40 CFR 51.100(s), as amended, are to be excluded for the purposes of measuring the hourly emission rate as required in § 65.64(f) for process vents subject to subpart III, NNN, or RRR of part 60 of this chapter.
Total resource effectiveness index value or TRE index value means a calculated value used to determine whether control is required for a process vent. It is based on process vent flow rate, emission rate of regulated material, net heating value, and corrosion properties (halogenated compound content), as quantified by the equations given under § 65.64(h).
Vapor balancing system means a piping system that is designed to collect regulated material vapors displaced from tank trucks or railcars during loading and to route the collected regulated material vapors to the storage vessel from which the liquid being loaded originated, or to another storage vessel connected by a common header; or to compress and route to a process or a fuel gas system the collected regulated material vapors.
Vapor-mounted seal means a continuous seal that is mounted so that there is a vapor space between the stored liquid and the bottom of the seal.
Visible emission means the observation of an emission of opacity or optical density above the threshold of vision.
[65 FR 78285, Dec. 14, 2000, as amended at 71 FR 20471, Apr. 20, 2006; 72 FR 48942, Aug. 27, 2007]

Title 40 published on 2014-07-01

no entries appear in the Federal Register after this date.

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