40 CFR Part 112, Appendix F to Part 112 - Facility-Specific Response Plan

View PDF at GPO Pt. 112, App. F
Appendix F to Part 112—Facility-Specific Response Plan
Table of Contents
1.0Model Facility-Specific Response Plan
1.1Emergency Response Action Plan
1.2Facility Information
1.3Emergency Response Information
1.3.1Notification
1.3.2Response Equipment List
1.3.3Response Equipment Testing/Deployment
1.3.4Personnel
1.3.5Evacuation Plans
1.3.6Qualified Individual's Duties
1.4Hazard Evaluation
1.4.1Hazard Identification
1.4.2Vulnerability Analysis
1.4.3Analysis of the Potential for an Oil Spill
1.4.4Facility Reportable Oil Spill History
1.5Discharge Scenarios
1.5.1Small and Medium Discharges
1.5.2Worst Case Discharge
1.6Discharge Detection Systems
1.6.1Discharge Detection By Personnel
1.6.2Automated Discharge Detection
1.7Plan Implementation
1.7.1Response Resources for Small, Medium, and Worst Case Spills
1.7.2Disposal Plans
1.7.3Containment and Drainage Planning
1.8Self-Inspection, Drills/Exercises, and Response Training
1.8.1Facility Self-Inspection
1.8.1.1Tank Inspection
1.8.1.2Response Equipment Inspection
1.8.1.3Secondary Containment Inspection
1.8.2Facility Drills/Exercises
1.8.2.1Qualified Individual Notification Drill Logs
1.8.2.2Spill Management Team Tabletop Exercise Logs
1.8.3Response Training
1.8.3.1Personnel Response Training Logs
1.8.3.2Discharge Prevention Meeting Logs
1.9Diagrams
1.10Security
2.0Response Plan Cover Sheet
3.0Acronyms
4.0References
1.0 Model Facility-Specific Response Plan
(A) Owners or operators of facilities regulated under this part which pose a threat of substantial harm to the environment by discharging oil into or on navigable waters or adjoining shorelines are required to prepare and submit facility-specific response plans to EPA in accordance with the provisions in this appendix. This appendix further describes the required elements in § 112.20(h).
(B) Response plans must be sent to the appropriate EPA Regional office. Figure F-1 of this Appendix lists each EPA Regional office and the address where owners or operators must submit their response plans. Those facilities deemed by the Regional Administrator (RA) to pose a threat of significant and substantial harm to the environment will have their plans reviewed and approved by EPA. In certain cases, information required in the model response plan is similar to information currently maintained in the facility's Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan as required by 40 CFR 112.3. In these cases, owners or operators may reproduce the information and include a photocopy in the response plan.
(C) A complex may develop a single response plan with a set of core elements for all regulating agencies and separate sections for the non-transportation-related and transportation-related components, as described in § 112.20(h). Owners or operators of large facilities that handle, store, or transport oil at more than one geographically distinct location (e.g., oil storage areas at opposite ends of a single, continuous parcel of property) shall, as appropriate, develop separate sections of the response plan for each storage area.
1.1Emergency Response Action Plan
Several sections of the response plan shall be co-located for easy access by response personnel during an actual emergency or oil discharge. This collection of sections shall be called the Emergency Response Action Plan. The Agency intends that the Action Plan contain only as much information as is necessary to combat the discharge and be arranged so response actions are not delayed. The Action Plan may be arranged in a number of ways. For example, the sections of the Emergency Response Action Plan may be photocopies or condensed versions of the forms included in the associated sections of the response plan. Each Emergency Response Action Plan section may be tabbed for quick reference. The Action Plan shall be maintained in the front of the same binder that contains the complete response plan or it shall be contained in a separate binder. In the latter case, both binders shall be kept together so that the entire plan can be accessed by the qualified individual and appropriate spill response personnel. The Emergency Response Action Plan shall be made up of the following sections:
1. Qualified Individual Information (Section 1.2) partial
2. Emergency Notification Phone List (Section 1.3.1) partial
3. Spill Response Notification Form (Section 1.3.1) partial
4. Response Equipment List and Location (Section 1.3.2) complete
5. Response Equipment Testing and Deployment (Section 1.3.3) complete
6. Facility Response Team (Section 1.3.4) partial
7. Evacuation Plan (Section 1.3.5) condensed
8. Immediate Actions (Section 1.7.1) complete
9. Facility Diagram (Section 1.9) complete
1.2Facility Information
The facility information form is designed to provide an overview of the site and a description of past activities at the facility. Much of the information required by this section may be obtained from the facility's existing SPCC Plan.
1.2.1Facility name and location: Enter facility name and street address. Enter the address of corporate headquarters only if corporate headquarters are physically located at the facility. Include city, county, state, zip code, and phone number.
1.2.2Latitude and Longitude: Enter the latitude and longitude of the facility. Include degrees, minutes, and seconds of the main entrance of the facility.
1.2.3Wellhead Protection Area: Indicate if the facility is located in or drains into a wellhead protection area as defined by the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1986 (SDWA). 1 The response plan requirements in the Wellhead Protection Program are outlined by the State or Territory in which the facility resides.

Footnote(s):
1 A wellhead protection area is defined as the surface and subsurface area surrounding a water well or wellfield, supplying a public water system, through which contaminants are reasonably likely to move toward and reach such water well or wellfield. For further information regarding State and territory protection programs, facility owners or operators may contact the SDWA Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

1.2.4Owner/operator: Write the name of the company or person operating the facility and the name of the person or company that owns the facility, if the two are different. List the address of the owner, if the two are different.
1.2.5Qualified Individual: Write the name of the qualified individual for the entire facility. If more than one person is listed, each individual indicated in this section shall have full authority to implement the facility response plan. For each individual, list: name, position, home and work addresses (street addresses, not P.O. boxes), emergency phone number, and specific response training experience.
1.2.6Date of Oil Storage Start-up: Enter the year which the present facility first started storing oil.
1.2.7Current Operation: Briefly describe the facility's operations and include the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) code.
1.2.8Dates and Type of Substantial Expansion: Include information on expansions that have occurred at the facility. Examples of such expansions include, but are not limited to: Throughput expansion, addition of a product line, change of a product line, and installation of additional oil storage capacity. The data provided shall include all facility historical information and detail the expansion of the facility. An example of substantial expansion is any material alteration of the facility which causes the owner or operator of the facility to re-evaluate and increase the response equipment necessary to adequately respond to a worst case discharge from the facility.
Date of Last Update: ___
Facility Information Form
Facility Name:
Location (Street Address):
City: ___ State: ___ Zip: ___
County: ___ Phone Number: () ___
Latitude: ___ Degrees ___ Minutes ___ Seconds
Longitude: ___ Degrees ___ Minutes ___ Seconds
Wellhead Protection Area:
Owner:
Owner Location (Street Address):
(if different from Facility Address)
City: ___ State:___ Zip: ___
County: ___ Phone Number: () ___
Operator (if not Owner):
Qualified Individual(s): (attach additional sheets if more than one)
Name:
Position:
Work Address:
Home Address:
Emergency Phone Number: ()
Date of Oil Storage Start-up:
Current Operations:
Date(s) and Type(s) of Substantial Expansion(s):
(Attach additional sheets if necessary)
1.3Emergency Response Information
(A) The information provided in this section shall describe what will be needed in an actual emergency involving the discharge of oil or a combination of hazardous substances and oil discharge. The Emergency Response Information section of the plan must include the following components:
(1) The information provided in the Emergency Notification Phone List in section 1.3.1 identifies and prioritizes the names and phone numbers of the organizations and personnel that need to be notified immediately in the event of an emergency. This section shall include all the appropriate phone numbers for the facility. These numbers must be verified each time the plan is updated. The contact list must be accessible to all facility employees to ensure that, in case of a discharge, any employee on site could immediately notify the appropriate parties.
(2) The Spill Response Notification Form in section 1.3.1 creates a checklist of information that shall be provided to the National Response Center (NRC) and other response personnel. All information on this checklist must be known at the time of notification, or be in the process of being collected. This notification form is based on a similar form used by the NRC. Note: Do not delay spill notification to collect the information on the list.
(3) Section 1.3.2 provides a description of the facility's list of emergency response equipment and location of the response equipment. When appropriate, the amount of oil that emergency response equipment can handle and any limitations (e.g., launching sites) must be described.
(4) Section 1.3.3 provides information regarding response equipment tests and deployment drills. Response equipment deployment exercises shall be conducted to ensure that response equipment is operational and the personnel who would operate the equipment in a spill response are capable of deploying and operating it. Only a representative sample of each type of response equipment needs to be deployed and operated, as long as the remainder is properly maintained. If appropriate, testing of response equipment may be conducted while it is being deployed. Facilities without facility-owned response equipment must ensure that the oil spill removal organization that is identified in the response plan to provide this response equipment certifies that the deployment exercises have been met. Refer to the National Preparedness for Response Exercise Program (PREP) Guidelines (see appendix E to this part, section 13, for availability), which satisfy Oil Pollution Act (OPA) response exercise requirements.
(5) Section 1.3.4 lists the facility response personnel, including those employed by the facility and those under contract to the facility for response activities, the amount of time needed for personnel to respond, their responsibility in the case of an emergency, and their level of response training. Three different forms are included in this section. The Emergency Response Personnel List shall be composed of all personnel employed by the facility whose duties involve responding to emergencies, including oil discharges, even when they are not physically present at the site. An example of this type of person would be the Building Engineer-in-Charge or Plant Fire Chief. The second form is a list of the Emergency Response Contractors (both primary and secondary) retained by the facility. Any changes in contractor status must be reflected in updates to the response plan. Evidence of contracts with response contractors shall be included in this section so that the availability of resources can be verified. The last form is the Facility Response Team List, which shall be composed of both emergency response personnel (referenced by job title/position) and emergency response contractors, included in one of the two lists described above, that will respond immediately upon discovery of an oil discharge or other emergency (i.e., the first people to respond). These are to be persons normally on the facility premises or primary response contractors. Examples of these personnel would be the Facility Hazardous Materials (HAZMAT) Spill Team 1, Facility Fire Engine Company 1, Production Supervisor, or Transfer Supervisor. Company personnel must be able to respond immediately and adequately if contractor support is not available.
(6) Section 1.3.5 lists factors that must, as appropriate, be considered when preparing an evacuation plan.
(7) Section 1.3.6 references the responsibilities of the qualified individual for the facility in the event of an emergency.
(B) The information provided in the emergency response section will aid in the assessment of the facility's ability to respond to a worst case discharge and will identify additional assistance that may be needed. In addition, the facility owner or operator may want to produce a wallet-size card containing a checklist of the immediate response and notification steps to be taken in the event of an oil discharge.
1.3.1Notification
Date of Last Update:
Emergency Notification Phone List Whom To Notify
Reporter's Name:
Date:
Facility Name:
Owner Name:
Facility Identification Number:
Date and Time of Each NRC Notification:
Organization Phone No.
1. National Response Center (NRC): 1-800-424-8802
2. Qualified Individual:
Evening Phone:
3. Company Response Team:
Evening Phone:
4. Federal On-Scene Coordinator (OSC) and/or Regional Response Center (RRC):
Evening Phone(s):
Pager Number(s):
5. Local Response Team (Fire Dept./Cooperatives):
6. Fire Marshall:
Evening Phone:
7. State Emergency Response Commission (SERC):
Evening Phone:
8. State Police:
9. Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC):
10. Local Water Supply System:
Evening Phone:
11. Weather Report:
12. Local Television/Radio Station for Evacuation Notification:
13. Hospitals:
Spill Response Notification Form
Reporter's Last Name:
First:
M.I.:
Position:
Phone Numbers:
Day ()-
Evening ()-
Company:
Organization Type:
Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Were Materials Discharged? ___ (Y/N) Confidential? ___ (Y/N)
Meeting Federal Obligations to Report? ___ (Y/N) Date Called: ___
Calling for Responsible Party? ___ (Y/N) Time Called: ___
Incident Description
Source and/or Cause of Incident:
Date of Incident:
Time of Incident: ___ AM/PM
Incident Address/Location:
Nearest City:________ State: ___ County: ____ Zip: ____
Distance from City: ___ Units of Measure: ___ Direction from City: ___
Section: ____ Township: ____ Range: ____ Borough: ____
Container Type: ___ Tank Oil Storage Capacity: ____ Units of Measure: ___
Facility Oil Storage Capacity: ____ Units of Measure: ___
Facility Latitude: ___ Degrees ___ Minutes ___ Seconds
Facility Longitude: ___ Degrees ___ Minutes ___ Seconds
Material
CHRIS Code Discharged quantity Unit of measure Material Discharged in water Quantity Unit of measure
Response Action
Actions Taken to Correct, Control or Mitigate Incident:
Impact
Number of Injuries: ___ Number of Deaths: ___
Were there Evacuations? ___ (Y/N) Number Evacuated: ___
Was there any Damage? ___ (Y/N)
Damage in Dollars (approximate):
Medium Affected:
Description:
More Information about Medium:
Additional Information
Any information about the incident not recorded elsewhere in the report:
Caller Notifications
EPA? ___ (Y/N) USCG? ___ (Y/N) State? ___ (Y/N)
Other? ___ (Y/N) Describe: ______
1.3.2Response Equipment List
Date of Last Update:___
Facility Response Equipment List
1. Skimmers/Pumps—Operational Status:
Type, Model, and Year:
TypeModelYear
Number:
Capacity: ____ gal./min.
Daily Effective Recovery Rate:
Storage Location(s):
Date Fuel Last Changed:
2. Boom—Operational Status:
Type, Model, and Year:
TypeModelYear
Number:
Size (length): ____ ft.
Containment Area: ____ sq. ft.
Storage Location:
3. Chemicals Stored (Dispersants listed on EPA's NCP Product Schedule)
Type Amount Datepurchased Treatment capacity Storagelocation
Were appropriate procedures used to receive approval for use of dispersants in accordance with the NCP (40 CFR 300.910) and the Area Contingency Plan (ACP), where applicable?___ (Y/N).
Name and State of On-Scene Coordinator (OSC) authorizing use: ___ .
Date Authorized: ___ .
4. Dispersant Dispensing Equipment—Operational Status: ___ .
Type and year Capacity Storagelocation Response time(minutes)
5. Sorbents—Operational Status:
Type and Year Purchased:
Amount:
Absorption Capacity (gal.):
Storage Location(s):
6. Hand Tools—Operational Status:
Type and year Quantity Storagelocation
7. Communication Equipment (include operating frequency and channel and/or cellular phone numbers)—Operational Status: ___
Type and year Quantity Storage location/number
8. Fire Fighting and Personnel Protective Equipment—Operational Status: ___
Type and year Quantity Storagelocation
9. Other (e.g., Heavy Equipment, Boats and Motors)—Operational Status: ___
Type and year Quantity Storagelocation
1.3.3Response Equipment Testing/Deployment
Date of Last Update:____
Response Equipment Testing and Deployment Drill Log
Last Inspection or Response Equipment Test Date:
Inspection Frequency:
Last Deployment Drill Date:
Deployment Frequency:
Oil Spill Removal Organization Certification (if applicable):
1.3.4Personnel
Date of Last Update:____
Emergency Response Personnel
Company Personnel
Name Phone 1 Response time Responsibility during response action Response training type/date
1 Phone number to be used when person is not on-site.
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Emergency Response Contractors
Date of Last Update: ____
Contractor Phone Response time Contract responsibility 1
1 Include evidence of contracts/agreements with response contractors to ensure the availability of personnel and response equipment.
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2.
3.
4.
Facility Response Team
Date of Last Update:____
Team member Response time (minutes) Phone or pager number (day/evening)
Note: If the facility uses contracted help in an emergency response situation, the owner or operator must provide the contractors' names and review the contractors' capacities to provide adequate personnel and response equipment.
Qualified Individual:
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1.3.5Evacuation Plans
1.3.5.1Based on the analysis of the facility, as discussed elsewhere in the plan, a facility-wide evacuation plan shall be developed. In addition, plans to evacuate parts of the facility that are at a high risk of exposure in the event of a discharge or other release must be developed. Evacuation routes must be shown on a diagram of the facility (see section 1.9 of this appendix). When developing evacuation plans, consideration must be given to the following factors, as appropriate:
(1) Location of stored materials;
(2) Hazard imposed by discharged material;
(3) Discharge flow direction;
(4) Prevailing wind direction and speed;
(5) Water currents, tides, or wave conditions (if applicable);
(6) Arrival route of emergency response personnel and response equipment;
(7) Evacuation routes;
(8) Alternative routes of evacuation;
(9) Transportation of injured personnel to nearest emergency medical facility;
(10) Location of alarm/notification systems;
(11) The need for a centralized check-in area for evacuation validation (roll call);
(12) Selection of a mitigation command center; and
(13) Location of shelter at the facility as an alternative to evacuation.
1.3.5.2One resource that may be helpful to owners or operators in preparing this section of the response plan is The Handbook of Chemical Hazard Analysis Procedures by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Department of Transportation (DOT), and EPA. The Handbook of Chemical Hazard Analysis Procedures is available from: FEMA , Publication Office, 500 C. Street, S.W., Washington, DC 20472, (202) 646-3484.
1.3.5.3As specified in § 112.20(h)(1)(vi), the facility owner or operator must reference existing community evacuation plans, as appropriate.
1.3.6Qualified Individual's Duties
The duties of the designated qualified individual are specified in § 112.20(h)(3)(ix). The qualified individual's duties must be described and be consistent with the minimum requirements in § 112.20(h)(3)(ix). In addition, the qualified individual must be identified with the Facility Information in section 1.2 of the response plan.
1.4Hazard Evaluation
This section requires the facility owner or operator to examine the facility's operations closely and to predict where discharges could occur. Hazard evaluation is a widely used industry practice that allows facility owners or operators to develop a complete understanding of potential hazards and the response actions necessary to address these hazards. The Handbook of Chemical Hazard Analysis Procedures, prepared by the EPA, DOT, and the FEMA and the Hazardous Materials Emergency Planning Guide (NRT-1), prepared by the National Response Team are good references for conducting a hazard analysis. Hazard identification and evaluation will assist facility owners or operators in planning for potential discharges, thereby reducing the severity of discharge impacts that may occur in the future. The evaluation also may help the operator identify and correct potential sources of discharges. In addition, special hazards to workers and emergency response personnel's health and safety shall be evaluated, as well as the facility's oil spill history.
1.4.1HazardIdentification
The Tank and Surface Impoundment (SI) forms, or their equivalent, that are part of this section must be completed according to the directions below. (“Surface Impoundment” means a facility or part of a facility which is a natural topographic depression, man-made excavation, or diked area formed primarily of earthen materials (although it may be lined with man-made materials), which is designed to hold an accumulation of liquid wastes or wastes containing free liquids, and which is not an injection well or a seepage facility.) Similar worksheets, or their equivalent, must be developed for any other type of storage containers.
(1) List each tank at the facility with a separate and distinct identifier. Begin aboveground tank identifiers with an “A” and belowground tank identifiers with a “B”, or submit multiple sheets with the aboveground tanks and belowground tanks on separate sheets.
(2) Use gallons for the maximum capacity of a tank; and use square feet for the area.
(3) Using the appropriate identifiers and the following instructions, fill in the appropriate forms:
(a) Tank or SI number—Using the aforementioned identifiers (A or B) or multiple reporting sheets, identify each tank or SI at the facility that stores oil or hazardous materials.
(b) Substance Stored—For each tank or SI identified, record the material that is stored therein. If the tank or SI is used to store more than one material, list all of the stored materials.
(c) Quantity Stored—For each material stored in each tank or SI, report the average volume of material stored on any given day.
(d) Tank Type or Surface Area/Year—For each tank, report the type of tank (e.g., floating top), and the year the tank was originally installed. If the tank has been refabricated, the year that the latest refabrication was completed must be recorded in parentheses next to the year installed. For each SI, record the surface area of the impoundment and the year it went into service.
(e) Maximum Capacity—Record the operational maximum capacity for each tank and SI. If the maximum capacity varies with the season, record the upper and lower limits.
(f) Failure/Cause—Record the cause and date of any tank or SI failure which has resulted in a loss of tank or SI contents.
(4) Using the numbers from the tank and SI forms, label a schematic drawing of the facility. This drawing shall be identical to any schematic drawings included in the SPCC Plan.
(5) Using knowledge of the facility and its operations, describe the following in writing:
(a) The loading and unloading of transportation vehicles that risk the discharge of oil or release of hazardous substances during transport processes. These operations may include loading and unloading of trucks, railroad cars, or vessels. Estimate the volume of material involved in transfer operations, if the exact volume cannot be determined.
(b) Day-to-day operations that may present a risk of discharging oil or releasing a hazardous substance. These activities include scheduled venting, piping repair or replacement, valve maintenance, transfer of tank contents from one tank to another, etc. (not including transportation-related activities). Estimate the volume of material involved in these operations, if the exact volume cannot be determined.
(c) The secondary containment volume associated with each tank and/or transfer point at the facility. The numbering scheme developed on the tables, or an equivalent system, must be used to identify each containment area. Capacities must be listed for each individual unit (tanks, slumps, drainage traps, and ponds), as well as the facility total.
(d) Normal daily throughput for the facility and any effect on potential discharge volumes that a negative or positive change in that throughput may cause.
Hazard Identification Tanks 1
Date of Last Update: ____
Tank No. Substance Stored (Oil and Hazardous Substance) Quantity Stored (gallons) Tank Type/Year Maximum Capacity (gallons) Failure/Cause
1 Tank = any container that stores oil.
Attach as many sheets as necessary.
Hazard Identification Surface Impoundments (SIs)
Date of Last Update: ____
SI No. Substance Stored Quantity Stored (gallons) Surface Area/Year Maximum Capacity (gallons) Failure/Cause
Attach as many sheets as necessary.
1.4.2Vulnerability Analysis
The vulnerability analysis shall address the potential effects (i.e., to human health, property, or the environment) of an oil discharge. Attachment C-III to Appendix C to this part provides a method that owners or operators shall use to determine appropriate distances from the facility to fish and wildlife and sensitive environments. Owners or operators can use a comparable formula that is considered acceptable by the RA. If a comparable formula is used, documentation of the reliability and analytical soundness of the formula must be attached to the response plan cover sheet. This analysis must be prepared for each facility and, as appropriate, must discuss the vulnerability of:
(1) Water intakes (drinking, cooling, or other);
(2) Schools;
(3) Medical facilities;
(4) Residential areas;
(5) Businesses;
(6) Wetlands or other sensitive environments; 2

Footnote(s):
2 Refer to the DOC/NOAA “Guidance for Facility and Vessel Response Plans: Fish and Wildlife and Sensitive Environments” (See appendix E to this part, section 13, for availability).

(7) Fish and wildlife;
(8) Lakes and streams;
(9) Endangered flora and fauna;
(10) Recreational areas;
(11) Transportation routes (air, land, and water);
(12) Utilities; and
(13) Other areas of economic importance (e.g., beaches, marinas) including terrestrially sensitive environments, aquatic environments, and unique habitats.
1.4.3Analysis of the Potential for an Oil Discharge
Each owner or operator shall analyze the probability of a discharge occurring at the facility. This analysis shall incorporate factors such as oil discharge history, horizontal range of a potential discharge, and vulnerability to natural disaster, and shall, as appropriate, incorporate other factors such as tank age. This analysis will provide information for developing discharge scenarios for a worst case discharge and small and medium discharges and aid in the development of techniques to reduce the size and frequency of discharges. The owner or operator may need to research the age of the tanks the oil discharge history at the facility.
1.4.4Facility Reportable Oil Spill History
Briefly describe the facility's reportable oil spill 3 history for the entire life of the facility to the extent that such information is reasonably identifiable, including:

Footnote(s):
3 As described in 40 CFR part 110, reportable oil spills are those that: (a) violate applicable water quality standards, or (b) cause a film or sheen upon or discoloration of the surface of the water or adjoining shorelines or cause a sludge or emulsion to be deposited beneath the surface of the water or upon adjoining shorelines.

(1) Date of discharge(s);
(2) List of discharge causes;
(3) Material(s) discharged;
(4) Amount discharged in gallons;
(5) Amount of discharge that reached navigable waters, if applicable;
(6) Effectiveness and capacity of secondary containment;
(7) Clean-up actions taken;
(8) Steps taken to reduce possibility of recurrence;
(9) Total oil storage capacity of the tank(s) or impoundment(s) from which the material discharged;
(10) Enforcement actions;
(11) Effectiveness of monitoring equipment; and
(12) Description(s) of how each oil discharge was detected.
The information solicited in this section may be similar to requirements in 40 CFR 112.4(a). Any duplicate information required by § 112.4(a) may be photocopied and inserted.
1.5Discharge Scenarios
In this section, the owner or operator is required to provide a description of the facility's worst case discharge, as well as a small and medium discharge, as appropriate. A multi-level planning approach has been chosen because the response actions to a discharge (i.e., necessary response equipment, products, and personnel) are dependent on the magnitude of the discharge. Planning for lesser discharges is necessary because the nature of the response may be qualitatively different depending on the quantity of the discharge. The facility owner or operator shall discuss the potential direction of the discharge pathway.
1.5.1Small and Medium Discharges
1.5.1.1To address multi-level planning requirements, the owner or operator must consider types of facility-specific discharge scenarios that may contribute to a small or medium discharge. The scenarios shall account for all the operations that take place at the facility, including but not limited to:
(1) Loading and unloading of surface transportation;
(2) Facility maintenance;
(3) Facility piping;
(4) Pumping stations and sumps;
(5) Oil storage tanks;
(6) Vehicle refueling; and
(7) Age and condition of facility and components.
1.5.1.2The scenarios shall also consider factors that affect the response efforts required by the facility. These include but are not limited to:
(1) Size of the discharge;
(2) Proximity to downgradient wells, waterways, and drinking water intakes;
(3) Proximity to fish and wildlife and sensitive environments;
(4) Likelihood that the discharge will travel offsite (i.e., topography, drainage);
(5) Location of the material discharged (i.e., on a concrete pad or directly on the soil);
(6) Material discharged;
(7) Weather or aquatic conditions (i.e., river flow);
(8) Available remediation equipment;
(9) Probability of a chain reaction of failures; and
(10) Direction of discharge pathway.
1.5.2Worst Case Discharge
1.5.2.1In this section, the owner or operator must identify the worst case discharge volume at the facility. Worksheets for production and non-production facility owners or operators to use when calculating worst case discharge are presented in appendix D to this part. When planning for the worst case discharge response, all of the aforementioned factors listed in the small and medium discharge section of the response plan shall be addressed.
1.5.2.2For onshore storage facilities and production facilities, permanently manifolded oil storage tanks are defined as tanks that are designed, installed, and/or operated in such a manner that the multiple tanks function as one storage unit (i.e., multiple tank volumes are equalized). In this section of the response plan, owners or operators must provide evidence that oil storage tanks with common piping or piping systems are not operated as one unit. If such evidence is provided and is acceptable to the RA, the worst case discharge volume shall be based on the combined oil storage capacity of all manifold tanks or the oil storage capacity of the largest single oil storage tank within the secondary containment area, whichever is greater. For permanently manifolded oil storage tanks that function as one storage unit, the worst case discharge shall be based on the combined oil storage capacity of all manifolded tanks or the oil storage capacity of the largest single tank within a secondary containment area, whichever is greater. For purposes of the worst case discharge calculation, permanently manifolded oil storage tanks that are separated by internal divisions for each tank are considered to be single tanks and individual manifolded tank volumes are not combined.
1.6Discharge Detection Systems
In this section, the facility owner or operator shall provide a detailed description of the procedures and equipment used to detect discharges. A section on discharge detection by personnel and a discussion of automated discharge detection, if applicable, shall be included for both regular operations and after hours operations. In addition, the facility owner or operator shall discuss how the reliability of any automated system will be checked and how frequently the system will be inspected.
1.6.1Discharge Detection by Personnel
In this section, facility owners or operators shall describe the procedures and personnel that will detect any discharge of oil or release of a hazardous substance. A thorough discussion of facility inspections must be included. In addition, a description of initial response actions shall be addressed. This section shall reference section 1.3.1 of the response plan for emergency response information.
1.6.2Automated Discharge Detection
In this section, facility owners or operators must describe any automated discharge detection equipment that the facility has in place. This section shall include a discussion of overfill alarms, secondary containment sensors, etc. A discussion of the plans to verify an automated alarm and the actions to be taken once verified must also be included.
1.7Plan Implementation
In this section, facility owners or operators must explain in detail how to implement the facility's emergency response plan by describing response actions to be carried out under the plan to ensure the safety of the facility and to mitigate or prevent discharges described in section 1.5 of the response plan. This section shall include the identification of response resources for small, medium, and worst case discharges; disposal plans; and containment and drainage planning. A list of those personnel who would be involved in the cleanup shall be identified. Procedures that the facility will use, where appropriate or necessary, to update their plan after an oil discharge event and the time frame to update the plan must be described.
1.7.1Response Resources for Small, Medium, and Worst Case Discharages
1.7.1.1Once the discharge scenarios have been identified in section 1.5 of the response plan, the facility owner or operator shall identify and describe implementation of the response actions. The facility owner or operator shall demonstrate accessibility to the proper response personnel and equipment to effectively respond to all of the identified discharge scenarios. The determination and demonstration of adequate response capability are presented in appendix E to this part. In addition, steps to expedite the cleanup of oil discharges must be discussed. At a minimum, the following items must be addressed:
(1) Emergency plans for spill response;
(2) Additional response training;
(3) Additional contracted help;
(4) Access to additional response equipment/experts; and
(5) Ability to implement the plan including response training and practice drills.
1.7.1.2A recommended form detailing immediate actions follows.
Oil Spill Response—Immediate Actions
Source: FOSS, Oil Spill Response—Emergency Procedures, Revised December 3, 1992.
1. Stop the product flow Act quickly to secure pumps, close valves, etc.
2. Warn personnel Enforce safety and security measures.
3. Shut off ignition sources Motors, electrical circuits, open flames, etc.
4. Initiate containment Around the tank and/or in the water with oil boom.
5. Notify NRC 1-800-424-8802
6. Notify OSC
7. Notify, as appropriate
1.7.2Disposal Plans
1.7.2.1Facility owners or operators must describe how and where the facility intends to recover, reuse, decontaminate, or dispose of materials after a discharge has taken place. The appropriate permits required to transport or dispose of recovered materials according to local, State, and Federal requirements must be addressed. Materials that must be accounted for in the disposal plan, as appropriate, include:
(1) Recovered product;
(2) Contaminated soil;
(3) Contaminated equipment and materials, including drums, tank parts, valves, and shovels;
(4) Personnel protective equipment;
(5) Decontamination solutions;
(6) Adsorbents; and
(7) Spent chemicals.
1.7.2.2These plans must be prepared in accordance with Federal (e.g., the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA]), State, and local regulations, where applicable. A copy of the disposal plans from the facility's SPCC Plan may be inserted with this section, including any diagrams in those plans.
Material Disposal facility Location RCRA permit/manifest
1.
2.
3.
4.
1.7.3Containment and Drainage Planning
A proper plan to contain and control a discharge through drainage may limit the threat of harm to human health and the environment. This section shall describe how to contain and control a discharge through drainage, including:
(1) The available volume of containment (use the information presented in section 1.4.1 of the response plan);
(2) The route of drainage from oil storage and transfer areas;
(3) The construction materials used in drainage troughs;
(4) The type and number of valves and separators used in the drainage system;
(5) Sump pump capacities;
(6) The containment capacity of weirs and booms that might be used and their location (see section 1.3.2 of this appendix); and
(7) Other cleanup materials.
In addition, a facility owner or operator must meet the inspection and monitoring requirements for drainage contained in 40 CFR part 112, subparts A through C. A copy of the containment and drainage plans that are required in 40 CFR part 112, subparts A through C may be inserted in this section, including any diagrams in those plans.
Note:
The general permit for stormwater drainage may contain additional requirements.
1.8Self-Inspection, Drills/Exercises, and Response Training
The owner or operator must develop programs for facility response training and for drills/exercises according to the requirements of 40 CFR 112.21. Logs must be kept for facility drills/exercises, personnel response training, and spill prevention meetings. Much of the recordkeeping information required by this section is also contained in the SPCC Plan required by 40 CFR 112.3. These logs may be included in the facility response plan or kept as an annex to the facility response plan.
1.8.1Facility Self-Inspection
Under 40 CFR 112.7(e), you must include the written procedures and records of inspections for each facility in the SPCC Plan. You must include the inspection records for each container, secondary containment, and item of response equipment at the facility. You must cross-reference the records of inspections of each container and secondary containment required by 40 CFR 112.7(e) in the facility response plan. The inspection record of response equipment is a new requirement in this plan. Facility self-inspection requires two-steps: (1) a checklist of things to inspect; and (2) a method of recording the actual inspection and its findings. You must note the date of each inspection. You must keep facility response plan records for five years. You must keep SPCC records for three years.
1.8.1.1.Tank Inspection
The tank inspection checklist presented below has been included as guidance during inspections and monitoring. Similar requirements exist in 40 CFR part 112, subparts A through C. Duplicate information from the SPCC Plan may be photocopied and inserted in this section. The inspection checklist consists of the following items:
Tank Inspection Checklist
1. Check tanks for leaks, specifically looking for:
A. drip marks;
B. discoloration of tanks;
C. puddles containing spilled or leaked material;
D. corrosion;
E. cracks; and
F. localized dead vegetation.
2. Check foundation for:
A. cracks;
B. discoloration;
C. puddles containing spilled or leaked material;
D. settling;
E. gaps between tank and foundation; and
F. damage caused by vegetation roots.
3. Check piping for:
A. droplets of stored material;
B. discoloration;
C. corrosion;
D. bowing of pipe between supports;
E. evidence of stored material seepage from valves or seals; and
F. localized dead vegetation.
Tank/Surface Impoundment Inspection Log
Inspector Tank or SI# Date Comments
1.8.1.2Response Equipment Inspection
Using the Emergency Response Equipment List provided in section 1.3.2 of the response plan, describe each type of response equipment, checking for the following:
Response Equipment Checklist
1. Inventory (item and quantity);
2. Storage location;
3. Accessibility (time to access and respond);
4. Operational status/condition;
5. Actual use/testing (last test date and frequency of testing); and
6. Shelf life (present age, expected replacement date).
Please note any discrepancies between this list and the available response equipment.
Response Equipment Inspection Log
[Use section 1.3 .2 of the response plan as a checklist]
Inspector Date Comments
1.8.1.3Secondary Containment Inspection
Inspect the secondary containment (as described in sections 1.4.1 and 1.7.2 of the response plan), checking the following:
Secondary Containment Checklist
1. Dike or berm system.
A. Level of precipitation in dike/available capacity;
B. Operational status of drainage valves;
C. Dike or berm permeability;
D. Debris;
E. Erosion;
F. Permeability of the earthen floor of diked area; and
G. Location/status of pipes, inlets, drainage beneath tanks, etc.
2. Secondary containment
A. Cracks;
B. Discoloration;
C. Presence of spilled or leaked material (standing liquid);
D. Corrosion; and
E. Valve conditions.
3. Retention and drainage ponds
A. Erosion;
B. Available capacity;
C. Presence of spilled or leaked material;
D. Debris; and
E. Stressed vegetation.
The tank inspection checklist presented below has been included as guidance during inspections and monitoring. Similar requirements exist in 40 CFR part 112, subparts A through C. Similar requirements exist in 40 CFR 112.7(e). Duplicate information from the SPCC Plan may be photocopied and inserted in this section.
1.8.2Facility Drills/Exercises
(A) CWA section 311(j)(5), as amended by OPA, requires the response plan to contain a description of facility drills/exercises. According to 40 CFR 112.21(c), the facility owner or operator shall develop a program of facility response drills/exercises, including evaluation procedures. Following the PREP guidelines (see appendix E to this part, section 13, for availability) would satisfy a facility's requirements for drills/exercises under this part. Alternately, under § 112.21(c), a facility owner or operator may develop a program that is not based on the PREP guidelines. Such a program is subject to approval by the Regional Administrator based on the description of the program provided in the response plan.
(B) The PREP Guidelines specify that the facility conduct internal and external drills/exercises. The internal exercises include: qualified individual notification drills, spill management team tabletop exercises, equipment deployment exercises, and unannounced exercises. External exercises include Area Exercises. Credit for an Area or Facility-specific Exercise will be given to the facility for an actual response to a discharge in the area if the plan was utilized for response to the discharge and the objectives of the Exercise were met and were properly evaluated, documented, and self-certified.
(C) Section 112.20(h)(8)(ii) requires the facility owner or operator to provide a description of the drill/exercise program to be carried out under the response plan. Qualified Individual Notification Drill and Spill Management Team Tabletop Drill logs shall be provided in sections 1.8.2.1 and 1.8.2.2, respectively. These logs may be included in the facility response plan or kept as an annex to the facility response plan. See section 1.3.3 of this appendix for Equipment Deployment Drill Logs.
1.8.2.1Qualified Individual Notification Drill Logs
Qualified Individual Notification Drill Log
Date:
Company:
Qualified Individual(s):
Emergency Scenario:
Evaluation:
Changes to be Implemented:
Time Table for Implementation:
1.8.2.2Spill Management Team Tabletop Exercise Logs
Spill Management Team Tabletop Exercise Log
Date:
Company:
Qualified Individual(s):
Emergency Scenario:
Evaluation:
Changes to be Implemented:
Time Table for Implementation:
1.8.3Response Training
Section 112.21(a) requires facility owners or operators to develop programs for facility response training. Facility owners or operators are required by § 112.20(h)(8)(iii) to provide a description of the response training program to be carried out under the response plan. A facility's training program can be based on the USCG's Training Elements for Oil Spill Response, to the extent applicable to facility operations, or another response training program acceptable to the RA. The training elements are available from the USCG Office of Response (G-MOR) at (202) 267-0518 or fax (202) 267-4085. Personnel response training logs and discharge prevention meeting logs shall be included in sections 1.8.3.1 and 1.8.3.2 of the response plan respectively. These logs may be included in the facility response plan or kept as an annex to the facility response plan.
1.8.3.1Personnel Response Training Logs
Personnel Response Training Log
Name Response training/date and number of hours Prevention training/date and number of hours
1.8.3.2Discharge Prevention Meetings Logs
Discharge Prevention Meeting Log
Date:
Attendees:
Subject/issue identified Required action Implementation date
1.9Diagrams
The facility-specific response plan shall include the following diagrams. Additional diagrams that would aid in the development of response plan sections may also be included.
(1) The Site Plan Diagram shall, as appropriate, include and identify:
(A) the entire facility to scale;
(B) above and below ground bulk oil storage tanks;
(C) the contents and capacities of bulk oil storage tanks;
(D) the contents and capacity of drum oil storage areas;
(E) the contents and capacities of surface impoundments;
(F) process buildings;
(G) transfer areas;
(H) secondary containment systems (location and capacity);
(I) structures where hazardous materials are stored or handled, including materials stored and capacity of storage;
(J) location of communication and emergency response equipment;
(K) location of electrical equipment which contains oil; and
(L) for complexes only, the interface(s) (i.e., valve or component) between the portion of the facility regulated by EPA and the portion(s) regulated by other Agencies. In most cases, this interface is defined as the last valve inside secondary containment before piping leaves the secondary containment area to connect to the transportation-related portion of the facility (i.e., the structure used or intended to be used to transfer oil to or from a vessel or pipeline). In the absence of secondary containment, this interface is the valve manifold adjacent to the tank nearest the transfer structure as described above. The interface may be defined differently at a specific facility if agreed to by the RA and the appropriate Federal official.
(2) The Site Drainage Plan Diagram shall, as appropriate, include:
(A) major sanitary and storm sewers, manholes, and drains;
(B) weirs and shut-off valves;
(C) surface water receiving streams;
(D) fire fighting water sources;
(E) other utilities;
(F) response personnel ingress and egress;
(G) response equipment transportation routes; and
(H) direction of discharge flow from discharge points.
(3) The Site Evacuation Plan Diagram shall, as appropriate, include:
(A) site plan diagram with evacuation route(s); and
(B) location of evacuation regrouping areas.
1.10Security
According to 40 CFR 112.7(g) facilities are required to maintain a certain level of security, as appropriate. In this section, a description of the facility security shall be provided and include, as appropriate:
(1) emergency cut-off locations (automatic or manual valves);
(2) enclosures (e.g., fencing, etc.);
(3) guards and their duties, day and night;
(4) lighting;
(5) valve and pump locks; and
(6) pipeline connection caps.
The SPCC Plan contains similar information. Duplicate information may be photocopied and inserted in this section.
2.0Response Plan Cover Sheet
A three-page form has been developed to be completed and submitted to the RA by owners or operators who are required to prepare and submit a facility-specific response plan. The cover sheet (Attachment F-1) must accompany the response plan to provide the Agency with basic information concerning the facility. This section will describe the Response Plan Cover Sheet and provide instructions for its completion.
2.1General Information
Owner/Operator of Facility: Enter the name of the owner of the facility (if the owner is the operator). Enter the operator of the facility if otherwise. If the owner/operator of the facility is a corporation, enter the name of the facility's principal corporate executive. Enter as much of the name as will fit in each section.
(1) Facility Name: Enter the proper name of the facility.
(2) Facility Address: Enter the street address, city, State, and zip code.
(3) Facility Phone Number: Enter the phone number of the facility.
(4) Latitude and Longitude: Enter the facility latitude and longitude in degrees, minutes, and seconds.
(5) Dun and Bradstreet Number: Enter the facility's Dun and Bradstreet number if available (this information may be obtained from public library resources).
(6) North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) Code: Enter the facility's NAICS code as determined by the Office of Management and Budget (this information may be obtained from public library resources.)
(7) Largest Oil Storage Tank Capacity: Enter the capacity in GALLONS of the largest aboveground oil storage tank at the facility.
(8) Maximum Oil Storage Capacity: Enter the total maximum capacity in GALLONS of all aboveground oil storage tanks at the facility.
(9) Number of Oil Storage Tanks: Enter the number of all aboveground oil storage tanks at the facility.
(10) Worst Case Discharge Amount: Using information from the worksheets in appendix D, enter the amount of the worst case discharge in GALLONS.
(11) Facility Distance to Navigable Waters: Mark the appropriate line for the nearest distance between an opportunity for discharge (i.e., oil storage tank, piping, or flowline) and a navigable water.
2.2Applicability of Substantial Harm Criteria
Using the flowchart provided in Attachment C-I to appendix C to this part, mark the appropriate answer to each question. Explanations of referenced terms can be found in Appendix C to this part. If a comparable formula to the ones described in Attachment C-III to appendix C to this part is used to calculate the planning distance, documentation of the reliability and analytical soundness of the formula must be attached to the response plan cover sheet.
2.3Certification
Complete this block after all other questions have been answered.
3.0Acronyms
ACP: Area Contingency Plan
ASTM: American Society of Testing Materials
bbls: Barrels
bpd: Barrels per Day
bph: Barrels per Hour
CHRIS: Chemical Hazards Response Information System
CWA: Clean Water Act
DOI: Department of Interior
DOC: Department of Commerce
DOT: Department of Transportation
EPA: Environmental Protection Agency
FEMA: Federal Emergency Management Agency
FR: Federal Register
gal: Gallons
gpm: Gallons per Minute
HAZMAT: Hazardous Materials
LEPC: Local Emergency Planning Committee
MMS: Minerals Management Service (part of DOI)
NAICS: North American Industrial Classification System
NCP: National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan
NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (part of DOC)
NRC: National Response Center
NRT: National Response Team
OPA: Oil Pollution Act of 1990
OSC: On-Scene Coordinator
PREP: National Preparedness for Response Exercise Program
RA: Regional Administrator
RCRA: Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
RRC: Regional Response Centers
RRT: Regional Response Team
RSPA: Research and Special Programs Administration
SARA: Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act
SERC: State Emergency Response Commission
SDWA: Safe Drinking Water Act of 1986
SI: Surface Impoundment
SPCC: Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures
USCG: United States Coast Guard
4.0References
CONCAWE. 1982. Methodologies for Hazard Analysis and Risk Assessment in the Petroleum Refining and Storage Industry. Prepared by CONCAWE's Risk Assessment Ad-hoc Group.
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. 1987. Siting of HUD-Assisted Projects Near Hazardous Facilities: Acceptable Separation Distances from Explosive and Flammable Hazards. Prepared by the Office of Environment and Energy, Environmental Planning Division, Department of Housing and Urban Development. Washington, DC.
U.S. DOT, FEMA and U.S. EPA. Handbook of Chemical Hazard Analysis Procedures.
U.S. DOT, FEMA and U.S. EPA. Technical Guidance for Hazards Analysis: Emergency Planning for Extremely Hazardous Substances.
The National Response Team. 1987. Hazardous Materials Emergency Planning Guide. Washington, DC.
The National Response Team. 1990. Oil Spill Contingency Planning, National Status: A Report to the President. Washington, DC. U.S. Government Printing Office.
Offshore Inspection and Enforcement Division. 1988. Minerals Management Service, Offshore Inspection Program: National Potential Incident of Noncompliance (PINC) List. Reston, VA.
Attachments to Appendix F
Attachment F-1—Response Plan Cover Sheet
This cover sheet will provide EPA with basic information concerning the facility. It must accompany a submitted facility response plan. Explanations and detailed instructions can be found in appendix F. Please type or write legibly in blue or black ink. Public reporting burden for the collection of this information is estimated to vary from 1 hour to 270 hours per response in the first year, with an average of 5 hours per response. This estimate includes time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding the burden estimate of this information, including suggestions for reducing this burden to: Chief, Information Policy Branch, Mail Code: PM-2822, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Ariel Rios Building, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20460; and to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, Washington D.C. 20503.
General Information
Owner/Operator of Facility:
Facility Name:
Facility Address (street address or route):
City, State, and U.S. Zip Code:
Facility Phone No.:
Latitude (Degrees: North):
degrees, minutes, seconds
Dun & Bradstreet Number: 1

Footnote(s):
1 These numbers may be obtained from public library resources.

Largest Aboveground Oil Storage Tank Capacity (Gallons):
Number of Aboveground Oil Storage Tanks:
Longitude (Degrees: West):
degrees, minutes, seconds
North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) Code: 1
Maximum Oil Storage Capacity (Gallons):
Worst Case Oil Discharge Amount (Gallons):
Facility Distance to Navigable Water. Mark the appropriate line.
0-1/4 mile __ 1/4-1/2 mile __ 1/2-1 mile __ >1 mile __
Applicability of Substantial Harm Criteria
Does the facility transfer oil over-water 2 to or from vessels and does the facility have a total oil storage capacity greater than or equal to 42,000 gallons?

Footnote(s):
2 Explanations of the above-referenced terms can be found in appendix C to this part. If a comparable formula to the ones contained in Attachment C-III is used to establish the appropriate distance to fish and wildlife and sensitive environments or public drinking water intakes, documentation of the reliability and analytical soundness of the formula must be attached to this form.

Yes
No
Does the facility have a total oil storage capacity greater than or equal to 1 million gallons and, within any storage area, does the facility lack secondary containment 2 that is sufficiently large to contain the capacity of the largest aboveground oil storage tank plus sufficient freeboard to allow for precipitation?
Yes
No
Does the facility have a total oil storage capacity greater than or equal to 1 million gallons and is the facility located at a distance 2 (as calculated using the appropriate formula in appendix C or a comparable formula) such that a discharge from the facility could cause injury to fish and wildlife and sensitive environments? 3

Footnote(s):
3 For further description of fish and wildlife and sensitive environments, see Appendices I, II, and III to DOC/NOAA's “Guidance for Facility and Vessel Response Plans: Fish and Wildlife and Sensitive Environments” (see appendix E to this part, section 13, for availability) and the applicable ACP.

Yes
No
Does the facility have a total oil storage capacity greater than or equal to 1 million gallons and is the facility located at a distance 2 (as calculated using the appropriate formula in appendix C or a comparable formula) such that a discharge from the facility would shut down a public drinking water intake? 2
Yes
No
Does the facility have a total oil storage capacity greater than or equal to 1 million gallons and has the facility experienced a reportable oil spill 2 in an amount greater than or equal to 10,000 gallons within the last 5 years?
Yes
No
Certification
I certify under penalty of law that I have personally examined and am familiar with the information submitted in this document, and that based on my inquiry of those individuals responsible for obtaining information, I believe that the submitted information is true, accurate, and complete.
Signature:
Name (Please type or print):
Title:
Date:
[59 FR 34122, July 1, 1994; 59 FR 49006, Sept. 26, 1994, as amended at 65 FR 40816, June 30, 2000; 65 FR 43840, July 14, 2000; 66 FR 34561, June 29, 2001; 67 FR 47152, July 17, 2002]

Title 40 published on 2013-07-01

no entries appear in the Federal Register after this date.

Title 40 published on 2013-07-01

The following are ALL rules, proposed rules, and notices (chronologically) published in the Federal Register relating to 40 CFR 112 after this date.

  • 2014-04-21; vol. 79 # 76 - Monday, April 21, 2014
    1. 79 FR 22188 - Definition of “Waters of the United States” Under the Clean Water Act
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers
      Proposed rule.
      Submit comments on or before July 21, 2014.
      33 CFR Part 328