40 CFR Part 50, Appendix I to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 8-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

View PDF at GPO Pt. 50, App. I
Appendix I to Part 50—Interpretation of the 8-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone
1. General.
This appendix explains the data handling conventions and computations necessary for determining whether the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone specified in § 50.10 are met at an ambient ozone air quality monitoring site. Ozone is measured in the ambient air by a reference method based on appendix D of this part. Data reporting, data handling, and computation procedures to be used in making comparisons between reported ozone concentrations and the level of the ozone standard are specified in the following sections. Whether to exclude, retain, or make adjustments to the data affected by stratospheric ozone intrusion or other natural events is subject to the approval of the appropriate Regional Administrator.
2. Primary and Secondary Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone.
2.1 Data Reporting and Handling Conventions.
2.1.1 Computing 8-hour averages. Hourly average concentrations shall be reported in parts per million (ppm) to the third decimal place, with additional digits to the right being truncated. Running 8-hour averages shall be computed from the hourly ozone concentration data for each hour of the year and the result shall be stored in the first, or start, hour of the 8-hour period. An 8-hour average shall be considered valid if at least 75% of the hourly averages for the 8-hour period are available. In the event that only 6 (or 7) hourly averages are available, the 8-hour average shall be computed on the basis of the hours available using 6 (or 7) as the divisor. (8-hour periods with three or more missing hours shall not be ignored if, after substituting one-half the minimum detectable limit for the missing hourly concentrations, the 8-hour average concentration is greater than the level of the standard.) The computed 8-hour average ozone concentrations shall be reported to three decimal places (the insignificant digits to the right of the third decimal place are truncated, consistent with the data handling procedures for the reported data.)
2.1.2 Daily maximum 8-hour average concentrations. (a) There are 24 possible running 8-hour average ozone concentrations for each calendar day during the ozone monitoring season. (Ozone monitoring seasons vary by geographic location as designated in part 58, appendix D to this chapter.) The daily maximum 8-hour concentration for a given calendar day is the highest of the 24 possible 8-hour average concentrations computed for that day. This process is repeated, yielding a daily maximum 8-hour average ozone concentration for each calendar day with ambient ozone monitoring data. Because the 8-hour averages are recorded in the start hour, the daily maximum 8-hour concentrations from two consecutive days may have some hourly concentrations in common. Generally, overlapping daily maximum 8-hour averages are not likely, except in those non-urban monitoring locations with less pronounced diurnal variation in hourly concentrations.
(b) An ozone monitoring day shall be counted as a valid day if valid 8-hour averages are available for at least 75% of possible hours in the day (i.e., at least 18 of the 24 averages). In the event that less than 75% of the 8-hour averages are available, a day shall also be counted as a valid day if the daily maximum 8-hour average concentration for that day is greater than the level of the ambient standard.
2.2 Primary and Secondary Standard-related Summary Statistic. The standard-related summary statistic is the annual fourth-highest daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentration, expressed in parts per million, averaged over three years. The 3-year average shall be computed using the three most recent, consecutive calendar years of monitoring data meeting the data completeness requirements described in this appendix. The computed 3-year average of the annual fourth-highest daily maximum 8-hour average ozone concentrations shall be expressed to three decimal places (the remaining digits to the right are truncated.)
2.3 Comparisons with the Primary and Secondary Ozone Standards. (a) The primary and secondary ozone ambient air quality standards are met at an ambient air quality monitoring site when the 3-year average of the annual fourth-highest daily maximum 8-hour average ozone concentration is less than or equal to 0.08 ppm. The number of significant figures in the level of the standard dictates the rounding convention for comparing the computed 3-year average annual fourth-highest daily maximum 8-hour average ozone concentration with the level of the standard. The third decimal place of the computed value is rounded, with values equal to or greater than 5 rounding up. Thus, a computed 3-year average ozone concentration of 0.085 ppm is the smallest value that is greater than 0.08 ppm.
(b) This comparison shall be based on three consecutive, complete calendar years of air quality monitoring data. This requirement is met for the three year period at a monitoring site if daily maximum 8-hour average concentrations are available for at least 90%, on average, of the days during the designated ozone monitoring season, with a minimum data completeness in any one year of at least 75% of the designated sampling days. When computing whether the minimum data completeness requirements have been met, meteorological or ambient data may be sufficient to demonstrate that meteorological conditions on missing days were not conducive to concentrations above the level of the standard. Missing days assumed less than the level of the standard are counted for the purpose of meeting the data completeness requirement, subject to the approval of the appropriate Regional Administrator.
(c) Years with concentrations greater than the level of the standard shall not be ignored on the ground that they have less than complete data. Thus, in computing the 3-year average fourth maximum concentration, calendar years with less than 75% data completeness shall be included in the computation if the average annual fourth maximum 8-hour concentration is greater than the level of the standard.
(d) Comparisons with the primary and secondary ozone standards are demonstrated by examples 1 and 2 in paragraphs (d)(1) and (d) (2) respectively as follows:
(1) As shown in example 1, the primary and secondary standards are met at this monitoring site because the 3-year average of the annual fourth-highest daily maximum 8-hour average ozone concentrations (i.e., 0.084 ppm) is less than or equal to 0.08 ppm. The data completeness requirement is also met because the average percent of days with valid ambient monitoring data is greater than 90%, and no single year has less than 75% data completeness.
Example 1. Ambient monitoring site attaining the primary and secondary ozone standards
Year Percent Valid Days 1st Highest Daily Max 8-hour Conc. (ppm) 2nd Highest Daily Max 8-hour Conc. (ppm) 3rd Highest Daily Max 8-hour Conc. (ppm) 4th Highest Daily Max 8-hour Conc. (ppm) 5th Highest Daily Max 8-hour Conc. (ppm)
1993 100% 0.092 0.091 0.090 0.088 0.085
1994 96% 0.090 0.089 0.086 0.084 0.080
1995 98% 0.087 0.085 0.083 0.080 0.075
Average 98%
(2) As shown in example 2, the primary and secondary standards are not met at this monitoring site because the 3-year average of the fourth-highest daily maximum 8-hour average ozone concentrations (i.e., 0.093 ppm) is greater than 0.08 ppm. Note that the ozone concentration data for 1994 is used in these computations, even though the data capture is less than 75%, because the average fourth-highest daily maximum 8-hour average concentration is greater than 0.08 ppm.
Example 2. Ambient Monitoring Site Failing to Meet the Primary and Secondary Ozone Standards
Year Percent Valid Days 1st Highest Daily Max 8-hour Conc. (ppm) 2nd Highest Daily Max 8-hour Conc. (ppm) 3rd Highest Daily Max 8-hour Conc. (ppm) 4th Highest Daily Max 8-hour Conc. (ppm) 5th Highest Daily Max 8-hour Conc. (ppm)
1993 96% 0.105 0.103 0.103 0.102 0.102
1994 74% 0.090 0.085 0.082 0.080 0.078
1995 98% 0.103 0.101 0.101 0.097 0.095
Average 89%
3. Design Values for Primary and Secondary Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone. The air quality design value at a monitoring site is defined as that concentration that when reduced to the level of the standard ensures that the site meets the standard. For a concentration-based standard, the air quality design value is simply the standard-related test statistic. Thus, for the primary and secondary ozone standards, the 3-year average annual fourth-highest daily maximum 8-hour average ozone concentration is also the air quality design value for the site.
[62 FR 38895, July 18, 1997]

Title 40 published on 2014-07-01

no entries appear in the Federal Register after this date.

Title 40 published on 2014-07-01

The following are ALL rules, proposed rules, and notices (chronologically) published in the Federal Register relating to 40 CFR 50 after this date.

  • 2014-12-17; vol. 79 # 242 - Wednesday, December 17, 2014
    1. 79 FR 75234 - National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
      Proposed rule.
      Written comments on this proposed rule must be received by March 17, 2015. Public Hearings: The EPA intends to hold three public hearings on this proposed rule in January 2015. These will be announced in a separate Federal Register notice that provides details, including specific dates, times, addresses, and contact information for these hearings.
      40 CFR Parts 50, 51, 52, 53, and 58