42 CFR 435.403 - State residence.

§ 435.403 State residence.
(a) Requirement. The agency must provide Medicaid to eligible residents of the State, including residents who are absent from the State. The conditions under which payment for services is provided to out-of-State residents are set forth in § 431.52 of this chapter.
(b) Definition. For purposes of this section—Institution has the same meaning as Institution and Medical institution, as defined in § 435.1010. For purposes of State placement, the term also includes foster care homes, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and providing food, shelter and supportive services to one or more persons unrelated to the proprietor.
(c) Incapability of indicating intent. For purposes of this section, an individual is considered incapable of indicating intent if the individual—
(1) Has an I.Q. of 49 or less or has a mental age of 7 or less, based on tests acceptable to the Intellectual Disability agency in the State:
(2) Is judged legally incompetent; or
(3) Is found incapable of indicating intent based on medical documentation obtained from a physician, psychologist, or other person licensed by the State in the field of intellectual disability.
(d) Who is a State resident. A resident of a State is any individual who:
(1) Meets the conditions in paragraphs (e) through (i) of this section; or
(2) Meets the criteria specified in an interstate agreement under paragraph (k) of this section.
(e) Placement by a State in an out-of-State institution—
(1) General rule. Any agency of the State, including an entity recognized under State law as being under contract with the State for such purposes, that arranges for an individual to be placed in an institution located in another State, is recognized as acting on behalf of the State in making a placement. The State arranging or actually making the placement is considered as the individual's State of residence.
(2) Any action beyond providing information to the individual and the individual's family would constitute arranging or making a State placement. However, the following actions do not constitute State placement:
(i) Providing basic information to individuals about another State's Medicaid program, and information about the availability of health care services and facilities in another State.
(ii) Assisting an individual in locating an institution in another State, provided the individual is capable of indicating intent and independently decides to move.
(3) When a competent individual leaves the facility in which the individual is placed by a State, that individual's State of residence for Medicaid purposes is the State where the individual is physically located.
(4) Where a placement is initiated by a State because the State lacks a sufficient number of appropriate facilities to provide services to its residents, the State making the placement is the individual's State of residence for Medicaid purposes.
(f) Individuals receiving a State supplementary payment (SSP). For individuals of any age who are receiving an SSP, the State of residence is the State paying the SSP.
(g) Individuals receiving Title IV-E payments. For individuals of any age who are receiving Federal payments for foster care and adoption assistance under title IV-E of the Social Security Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives.
(h) Individuals under Age 21.
(1) For any individual who is emancipated from his or her parents or who is married and capable of indicating intent, the State of residence is the State where the individual is living with the intention to remain there permanently or for an indefinite period.
(2) For any individual not residing in an institution as defined in paragraph (b) whose Medicaid eligibility is based on blindness or disability, the State of residence is the State in which the individual is living.
(3) For any other non-institutionalized individual not subject to paragraph (h)(1) or (h)(2) of this section, the State of residence is determined in accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program.
(4) For any institutionalized individual who is neither married nor emancipated, the State of residence is—
(i) The parent's or legal guardian's State of residence at the time of placement (if a legal guardian has been appointed and parental rights are terminated, the State of residence of the guardian is used instead of the parent's); or
(ii) The current State of residence of the parent or legal guardian who files the application if the individual is institutionalized in that State (if a legal guardian has been appointed and parental rights are terminated, the State or residence of the guardian is used instead of the parent's).
(iii) The State of residence of the individual or party who files an application is used if the individual has been abandoned by his or her parent(s), does not have a legal guardian and is institutionalized in that State.
(i) Individuals Age 21 and over.
(1) For any individual not residing in an institution as defined in paragraph (b), the State of residence is the State where the individual is—
(i) Living with the intention to remain there permanently or for an indefinite period (or if incapable of stating intent, where the individual is living); or
(ii) Living and which the individual entered with a job commitment or seeking employment (whether or not currently employed).
(2) For any institutionalized individual who became incapable of indicating intent before age 21, the State of residence is—
(i) That of the parent applying for Medicaid on the individual's behalf, if the parents reside in separate States (if a legal guardian has been appointed and parental rights are terminated, the State of residence of the guardian is used instead of the parent's);
(ii) The parent's or legal guardian's State of residence at the time of placement (if a legal guardian has been appointed and parental rights are terminated, the State of residence of the guardian is used instead of the parent's); or
(iii) The current State of residence of the parent or legal guardian who files the application if the individual is institutionalized in that State (if a legal guardian has been appointed and parental rights are terminated, the State of residence of the guardian is used instead of the parent's).
(iv) The State of residence of the individual or party who files an application is used if the individual has been abandoned by his or her parent(s), does not have a legal guardian and is institutionalized in that State.
(3) For any institutionalized individual who became incapable of indicating intent at or after age 21, the State of residence is the State in which the individual is physically present, except where another State makes a placement.
(4) For any other institutionalized individual, the State of residence is the State where the individual is living with the intention to remain there permanently or for an indefinite period.
(j) Specific prohibitions.
(1) The agency may not deny Medicaid eligibility because an individual has not resided in the State for a specified period.
(2) The agency may not deny Medicaid eligibility to an individual in an institution, who satisfies the residency rules set forth in this section, on the grounds that the individual did not establish residence in the State before entering the institution.
(3) The agency may not deny or terminate a resident's Medicaid eligibility because of that person's temporary absence from the State if the person intends to return when the purpose of the absence has been accomplished, unless another State has determined that the person is a resident there for purposes of Medicaid.
(k) Interstate agreements. A State may have a written agreement with another State setting forth rules and procedures resolving cases of disputed residency. These agreements may establish criteria other than those specified in paragraphs (c) through (i) of this section, but must not include criteria that result in loss of residency in both States or that are prohibited by paragraph (j) of this section. The agreements must contain a procedure for providing Medicaid to individuals pending resolution of the case. States may use interstate agreeements for purposes other than cases of disputed residency to facilitate administration of the program, and to facilitate the placement and adoption of title IV-E individuals when the child and his or her adoptive parent(s) move into another State.
(l) Continued Medicaid for institutionalized beneficiaries. If an agency is providing Medicaid to an institutionalized beneficiary who, as a result of this section, would be considered a resident of a different State—
(1) The agency must continue to provide Medicaid to that beneficiary from June 24, 1983 until July 5, 1984, unless it makes arrangements with another State of residence to provide Medicaid at an earlier date: and
(2) Those arrangements must not include provisions prohibited by paragraph (h) of this section.
(m) Cases of disputed residency. Where two or more States cannot resolve which State is the State of residence, the State where the individual is physically located is the State of residence.
[49 FR 13531, Apr. 5, 1984, as amended at 55 FR 48609, Nov. 21, 1990; 71 FR 39222, July 12, 2006]
Effective Date Note:
At 77 FR 17206, Mar. 23, 2012, § 435.403 was amended by redesignating paragraphs (h) and (i) as paragraphs (i) and (h), respectively; adding introductory text for newly redesignated paragraphs (h) and (i); further redesignating newly redesignated paragraphs (h)(2), (h)(3), and (h)(4) as paragraphs (h)(3), (h)(4), and (h)(5), respectively; adding new paragraph (h)(2); revising newly redesignated paragraphs (h)(1) and (h)(5); revising newly redesignated paragraphs (i)(1) and (i)(2); removing newly redesignated paragraph (i)(3); further redesignating newly redesignated paragraph (i)(4) as paragraph (i)(3); amending paragraph (l)(2) by removing the phrase “paragraph (h)” and adding the phrase “paragraph (i)” in its place, effective Jan. 1, 2014. For the convenience of the user, the added and revised text is set forth as follows:
§ 435.403 State residence.
(h) Individuals age 21 and over. Except as provided in paragraph (f) of this section, with respect to individuals age 21 and over —
(1) For an individual not residing in an institution as defined in paragraph (b) of this section, the State of residence is the State where the individual is living and—
(i) Intends to reside, including without a fixed address; or
(ii) Has entered the State with a job commitment or seeking employment (whether or not currently employed).
(2) For an individual not residing in an institution as defined in paragraph (b) of this section who is not capable of stating intent, the State of residency is the State where the individual is living.
(5) For any other institutionalized individual, the State of residence is the State where the individual is living and intends to reside.
(i) Individuals under age 21. For an individual under age 21 who is not eligible for Medicaid based on receipt of assistance under title IV-E of the Act, as addressed in paragraph (g) of this section, and is not receiving a State supplementary payment, as addressed in paragraph (f) of this section, the State of residence is as follows:
(1) For an individual who is capable of indicating intent and who is emancipated from his or her parent or who is married, the State of residence is determined in accordance with paragraph (h)(1) of this section.
(2) For an individual not described in paragraph (i)(1) of this section, not living in an institution as defined in paragraph (b) of this section and not eligible for Medicaid based on receipt of assistance under title IV-E of the Act, as addressed in paragraph (g) of this section, and is not receiving a State supplementary payment, as addressed in paragraph (f) of this section, the State of residence is:
(i) The State where the individual resides, including without a fixed address; or
(ii) The State of residency of the parent or caretaker, in accordance with paragraph (h)(1) of this section, with whom the individual resides.

Title 42 published on 2014-10-01

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