42 CFR 435.407 - Types of acceptable documentary evidence of citizenship.

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§ 435.407 Types of acceptable documentary evidence of citizenship.
For purposes of this section, the term “citizenship” includes status as a “national of the United States” as defined by section 101(a)(22) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(22)) to include both citizens of the United States and non-citizen nationals of the United States.
(a) Primary evidence of citizenship and identity. The following evidence must be accepted as satisfactory documentary evidence of both identity and citizenship:
(1) A U.S. passport. The Department of State issues this. A U.S. passport does not have to be currently valid to be accepted as evidence of U.S. citizenship, as long as it was originally issued without limitation. Note: Spouses and children were sometimes included on one passport through 1980. U.S. passports issued after 1980 show only one person. Consequently, the citizenship and identity of the included person can be established when one of these passports is presented. Exception: Do not accept any passport as evidence of U.S. citizenship when it was issued with a limitation. However, such a passport may be used as proof of identity.
(2) A Certificate of Naturalization (DHS Forms N-550 or N-570.) Department of Homeland Security issues for naturalization.
(3) A Certificate of U.S. Citizenship (DHS Forms N-560 or N-561.) Department of Homeland Security issues certificates of citizenship to individuals who derive citizenship through a parent.
(4) A valid State-issued driver's license, but only if the State issuing the license requires proof of U.S. citizenship before issuance of such license or obtains a social security number from the applicant and verifies before certification that such number is valid and assigned to the applicant who is a citizen. (This provision is not effective until such time as a State makes providing evidence of citizenship a condition of issuing a driver's license and evidence that the license holder is a citizen is included on the license or in a system of records available to the Medicaid agency. The State must ensure that the process complies with this statutory provision in section 6036 of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. CMS will monitor compliance of States implementing this provision.).
(b) Secondary evidence of citizenship. If primary evidence from the list in paragraph (a) of this section is unavailable, an applicant or beneficiary should provide satisfactory documentary evidence of citizenship from the list specified in this section to establish citizenship and satisfactory documentary evidence from paragraph (e) of this section to establish identity, in accordance with the rules specified in this section.
(1) A U.S. public birth certificate showing birth in one of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico (if born on or after January 13, 1941), Guam (on or after April 10, 1899), the Virgin Islands of the U.S. (on or after January 17, 1917), American Samoa, Swain's Island, or the Northern Mariana Islands (after November 4, 1986 (NMI local time)). A State, at its option, may use a cross match with a State vital statistics agency to document a birth record. The birth record document may be issued by the State, Commonwealth, Territory, or local jurisdiction. It must have been recorded before the person was 5 years of age. A delayed birth record document that is recorded at or after 5 years of age is considered fourth level evidence of citizenship. (Note: If the document shows the individual was born in Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands of the U.S., or the Northern Mariana Islands before these areas became part of the U.S., the individual may be a collectively naturalized citizen. Collective naturalization occurred on certain dates listed for each of the territories.) The following will establish U.S. citizenship for collectively naturalized individuals:
(i) Puerto Rico:
(A) Evidence of birth in Puerto Rico on or after April 11, 1899 and the applicant's statement that he or she was residing in the U.S., a U.S. possession, or Puerto Rico on January 13, 1941; or
(B) Evidence that the applicant was a Puerto Rican citizen and the applicant's statement that he or she was residing in Puerto Rico on March 1, 1917 and that he or she did not take an oath of allegiance to Spain.
(ii) U.S. Virgin Islands:
(A) Evidence of birth in the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the applicant's statement of residence in the U.S., a U.S. possession, or the U.S. Virgin Islands on February 25, 1927; or
(B) The applicant's statement indicating residence in the U.S. Virgin Islands as a Danish citizen on January 17, 1917 and residence in the U.S., a U.S. possession, or the U.S. Virgin Islands on February 25, 1927, and that he or she did not make a declaration to maintain Danish citizenship; or
(C) Evidence of birth in the U.S. Virgin Islands and the applicant's statement indicating residence in the U.S., a U.S. possession or Territory, or the Canal Zone on June 28, 1932.
(iii) Northern Mariana Islands (NMI) (formerly part of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (TTPI)):
(A) Evidence of birth in the NMI, TTPI citizenship and residence in the NMI, the U.S., or a U.S. Territory or possession on November 3, 1986 NMI local time) and the applicant's statement that he or she did not owe allegiance to a foreign State on November 4, 1986 (NMI local time); or
(B) Evidence of TTPI citizenship, continuous residence in the NMI since before November 3, 1981 (NMI local time), voter registration before January 1, 1975 and the applicant's statement that he or she did not owe allegiance to a foreign State on November 4, 1986 (NMI local time); or
(C) Evidence of continuous domicile in the NMI since before January 1, 1974 and the applicant's statement that he or she did not owe allegiance to a foreign State on November 4, 1986 (NMI local time).
(D) Note: If a person entered the NMI as a nonimmigrant and lived in the NMI since January 1, 1974, this does not constitute continuous domicile and the individual is not a U.S. citizen.
(2) A Certification of Report of Birth (DS-1350). The Department of State issues a DS-1350 to U.S. citizens in the U.S. who were born outside the U.S. and acquired U.S. citizenship at birth, based on the information shown on the FS-240. When the birth was recorded as a Consular Report of Birth (FS-240), certified copies of the Certification of Report of Birth Abroad (DS-1350) can be issued by the Department of State in Washington, DC. The DS-1350 contains the same information as that on the current version of Consular Report of Birth FS-240. The DS-1350 is not issued outside the U.S.
(3) A Report of Birth Abroad of a U.S. Citizen (Form FS-240). The Department of State consular office prepares and issues this. A Consular Report of Birth can be prepared only at an American consular office overseas while the child is under the age of 18. Children born outside the U.S. to U.S. military personnel usually have one of these.
(4) A Certification of birth issued by the Department of State (Form FS-545 or DS-1350). Before November 1, 1990, Department of State consulates also issued Form FS-545 along with the prior version of the FS-240. In 1990, U.S. consulates ceased to issue Form FS-545. Treat an FS-545 the same as the DS-1350.
(5) A U.S. Citizen I.D. card. (This form was issued until the 1980s by INS. Although no longer issued, holders of this document may still use it consistent with the provisions of section 1903(x) of the Act.) INS issued the I-179 from 1960 until 1973. It revised the form and renumbered it as Form I-197. INS issued the I-197 from 1973 until April 7, 1983. INS issued Form I-179 and I-197 to naturalized U.S. citizens living near the Canadian or Mexican border who needed it for frequent border crossings. Although neither form is currently issued, either form that was previously issued is still valid.
(6) A Northern Mariana Identification Card (I-873). (Issued by the DHS to a collectively naturalized citizen of the United States who was born in the Northern Mariana Islands before November 4, 1986.) The former Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) issued the I-873 to a collectively naturalized citizen of the U.S. who was born in the NMI before November 4, 1986. The card is no longer issued, but those previously issued are still valid.
(7) An American Indian Card (I-872) issued by the Department of Homeland Security with the classification code “KIC.” (Issued by DHS to identify U.S. citizen members of the Texas Band of Kickapoos living near the United States/Mexican border.) DHS issues this card to identify a member of the Texas Band of Kickapoos living near the U.S./Mexican border. A classification code “KIC” and a statement on the back denote U.S. citizenship.
(8) A final adoption decree showing the child's name and U.S. place of birth. The adoption decree must show the child's name and U.S. place of birth. In situations where an adoption is not finalized and the State in which the child was born will not release a birth certificate prior to final adoption, a statement from a State approved adoption agency that shows the child's name and U.S. place of birth is acceptable. The adoption agency must state in the certification that the source of the place of birth information is an original birth certificate.
(9) Evidence of U.S. Civil Service employment before June 1, 1976. The document must show employment by the U.S. government before June 1, 1976. Individuals employed by the U.S. Civil Service prior to June 1, 1976 had to be U.S. citizens.
(10) U.S. Military Record showing a U.S. place of birth. The document must show a U.S. place of birth (for example a DD-214 or similar official document showing a U.S. place of birth.)
(11) A data verification with the Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements (SAVE) Program for naturalized citizens. A State may conduct a verification with SAVE to determine if an individual is a naturalized citizen, provided that such verification is conducted consistent with the terms of a Memorandum of Understanding or other agreement with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) authorizing verification of claims to U.S. citizenship through SAVE, including but not limited to provision of the individual's alien registration number if required by DHS.
(12) Child Citizenship Act. Adopted or biological children born outside the United States may establish citizenship obtained automatically under section 320 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1431), as amended by the Child Citizenship Act of 2000 (Pub. L. 106-395, enacted on October 30, 2000). The State must obtain documentary evidence that verifies that at any time on or after February 27, 2001, the following conditions have been met:
(i) At least one parent of the child is a United States citizen by either birth or naturalization (as verified under the requirements of this Part);
(ii) The child is under the age of 18;
(iii) The child is residing in the United States in the legal and physical custody of the U.S. citizen parent;
(iv) The child was admitted to the United States for lawful permanent residence (as verified under the requirements of 8 U.S.C. 1641 pertaining to verification of qualified alien status); and
(v) If adopted, the child satisfies the requirements of section 101(b)(1) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(b)(1) pertaining to international adoptions (admission for lawful permanent residence as IR-3 (child adopted outside the United States)), or as IR-4 (child coming to the United States to be adopted) with final adoption having subsequently occurred).
(c) Third level evidence of citizenship. Third level evidence of U.S. citizenship is documentary evidence of satisfactory reliability that is used when both primary and secondary evidence is unavailable. Third level evidence may be used only when the applicant or beneficiary alleges being born in the U.S. A second document from paragraph (e) of this section to establish identity must also be presented:
(1) Extract of a hospital record on hospital letterhead established at the time of the person's birth that was created 5 years before the initial application date and that indicates a U.S. place of birth. (For children under 16 the document must have been created near the time of birth or 5 years before the date of application.) Do not accept a souvenir “birth certificate” issued by the hospital.
(2) Life, health, or other insurance record showing a U.S. place of birth that was created at least 5 years before the initial application date that indicates a U.S. place of birth. (For children under 16 the document must have been created near the time of birth or 5 years before the date of application.) Life or health insurance records may show biographical information for the person including place of birth; the record can be used to establish U.S. citizenship when it shows a U.S. place of birth.
(3) Religious record recorded in the U.S. within 3 months of birth showing the birth occurred in the U.S. and showing either the date of the birth or the individual's age at the time the record was made. The record must be an official record recorded with the religious organization. CAUTION: In questionable cases (for example, where the child's religious record was recorded near a U.S. international border and the child may have been born outside the U.S.), the State must verify the religious record and/or document that the mother was in the U.S. at the time of birth.
(4) Early school record showing a U.S. place of birth. The school record must show the name of the child, the date of admission to the school, the date of birth, a U.S. place of birth, and the name(s) and place(s) of birth of the applicant's parents.
(d) Fourth level evidence of citizenship. Fourth level evidence of citizenship is documentary evidence of the lowest reliability. Fourth level evidence should only be used in the rarest of circumstances. This level of evidence is used only when primary, secondary and third level evidence is unavailable. With the exception of the affidavit process described in paragraph (d)(5) of this section, the applicant may only use fourth level evidence of citizenship if alleging a U.S. place of birth. In addition, a second document establishing identity must be presented as described in paragraph (e) of this section.
(1) Federal or State census record showing U.S. citizenship or a U.S. place of birth. (Generally for persons born 1900 through 1950.) The census record must also show the applicant's age. Note: Census records from 1900 through 1950 contain certain citizenship information. To secure this information the applicant, beneficiary or State should complete a Form BC-600, Application for Search of Census Records for Proof of Age. Add in the remarks portion “U.S. citizenship data requested.” Also add that the purpose is for Medicaid eligibility. This form requires a fee.
(2) One of the following documents that show a U.S. place of birth and was created at least 5 years before the application for Medicaid. (For children under 16 the document must have been created near the time of birth or 5 years before the date of application.) This document must be one of the following and show a U.S. place of birth:
(i) Seneca Indian tribal census.
(ii) Bureau of Indian Affairs tribal census records of the Navajo Indians.
(iii) U.S. State Vital Statistics official notification of birth registration.
(iv) A delayed U.S. public birth record that is recorded more than 5 years after the person's birth.
(v) Statement signed by the physician or midwife who was in attendance at the time of birth.
(vi) The Roll of Alaska Natives maintained by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
(3) Institutional admission papers from a nursing facility, skilled care facility or other institution created at least 5 years before the initial application date that indicates a U.S. place of birth. Admission papers generally show biographical information for the person including place of birth; the record can be used to establish U.S. citizenship when it shows a U.S. place of birth.
(4) Medical (clinic, doctor, or hospital) record created at least 5 years before the initial application date that indicates a U.S. place of birth. (For children under 16 the document must have been created near the time of birth or 5 years before the date of application.)
Medical records generally show biographical information for the person including place of birth; the record can be used to establish U.S. citizenship when it shows a U.S. place of birth. (Note:An immunization record is not considered a medical record for purposes of establishing U.S. citizenship.)
(5) Written affidavit. Affidavits should ONLY be used in rare circumstances. If the documentation requirement needs to be met through affidavits, the following rules apply:
(i) There must be at least two affidavits by two individuals who have personal knowledge of the event(s) establishing the applicant's or beneficiary's claim of citizenship (the two affidavits could be combined in a joint affidavit).
(ii) At least one of the individuals making the affidavit cannot be related to the applicant or beneficiary. Neither of the two individuals can be the applicant or beneficiary.
(iii) In order for the affidavit to be acceptable the persons making them must be able to provide proof of their own citizenship and identity.
(iv) If the individual(s) making the affidavit has (have) information which explains why documentary evidence establishing the applicant's claim or citizenship does not exist or cannot be readily obtained, the affidavit should contain this information as well.
(v) The State must obtain a separate affidavit from the applicant/Beneficiary or other knowledgeable individual (guardian or representative) explaining why the evidence does not exist or cannot be obtained.
(vi) The affidavits must be signed under penalty of perjury and need not be notarized.
(e) Evidence of identity. The following documents may be accepted as proof of identity and must accompany a document establishing citizenship from the groups of documentary evidence of citizenship in the groups in paragraphs (b) through (d) of this section.
(1) Identity documents described in 8 CFR 274a.2(b)(1)(v)(B)(1).
(i) Driver's license issued by State or Territory either with a photograph of the individual or other identifying information of the individual such as name, age, sex, race, height, weight or eye color.
(ii) School identification card with a photograph of the individual.
(iii) U.S. military card or draft record.
(iv) Identification card issued by the Federal, State, or local government with the same information included on drivers' licenses.
(v) Military dependent's identification card.
(vi) Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood, or other American Indian/Alaska Native Tribal document with a photograph or other personal identifying information relating to the individual. Acceptable if the document carries a photograph of the applicant or beneficiary, or has other personal identifying information relating to the individual such as age, weight, height, race, sex, and eye color.
(vii) U.S. Coast Guard Merchant Mariner card.
Note to paragraph (e)(1):
Exception: Do not accept a voter's registration card or Canadian driver's license as listed in 8 CFR 274a.2(b)(1)(v)(B)(1). CMS does not view these as reliable for identity.
(2) At State option, a State may use a cross match with a Federal or State governmental, public assistance, law enforcement or corrections agency's data system to establish identity if the agency establishes and certifies true identity of individuals. Such agencies may include food stamps, child support, corrections, including juvenile detention, motor vehicle, or child protective services. The State Medicaid Agency is still responsible for assuring the accuracy of the identity determination.
(3) At State option, a State may accept three or more documents that together reasonably corroborate the identity of an individual provided such documents have not been used to establish the individual's citizenship and the individual submitted second or third tier evidence of citizenship. The State must first ensure that no other evidence of identity is available to the individual prior to accepting such documents. Such documents must at a minimum contain the individual's name, plus any additional information establishing the individual's identity. All documents used must contain consistent identifying information. These documents include employer identification cards, high school and college diplomas from accredited institutions (including general education and high school equivalency diplomas), marriage certificates, divorce decrees and property deeds/titles.
(f) Special identity rules for children. For children under 16, a clinic, doctor, hospital or school record may be accepted for purposes of establishing identity. School records may include nursery or daycare records and report cards. If the State accepts such records, it must verify them with the issuing school. If none of the above documents in the preceding groups are available, an affidavit may be used. An affidavit is only acceptable if it is signed under penalty of perjury by a parent, guardian or caretaker relative (as defined in the regulations at 45 CFR 233.90(c)(v)) stating the date and place of the birth of the child and cannot be used if an affidavit for citizenship was provided. The affidavit is not required to be notarized. A State may accept an identity affidavit on behalf of a child under the age of 18 in instances when school ID cards and drivers' licenses are not available to the individual in that area until that age.
(g) Special identity rules for disabled individuals in institutional care facilities. A State may accept an identity affidavit signed under penalty of perjury by a residential care facility director or administrator on behalf of an institutionalized individual in the facility. States should first pursue all other means of verifying identity prior to accepting an affidavit. The affidavit is not required to be notarized.
(h) Special populations needing assistance. States must assist individuals to secure satisfactory documentary evidence of citizenship when because of incapacity of mind or body the individual would be unable to comply with the requirement to present satisfactory documentary evidence of citizenship in a timely manner and the individual lacks a representative to assist him or her.
(i) Documentary evidence.
(1) All documents must be either originals or copies certified by the issuing agency. Uncertified copies, including notarized copies, shall not be accepted.
(2) States must maintain copies of citizenship and identification documents in the case record or electronic data base and make these copies available for compliance audits.
(3) States may permit applicants and beneficiaries to submit such documentary evidence without appearing in person at a Medicaid office. States may accept original documents in person, by mail, or by a guardian or authorized representative.
(4) If documents are determined to be inconsistent with pre-existing information, are counterfeit, or altered, States should investigate for potential fraud and abuse, including but not limited to, referral to the appropriate State and Federal law enforcement agencies.
(5) Presentation of documentary evidence of citizenship is a one time activity; once a person's citizenship is documented and recorded in a State database subsequent changes in eligibility should not require repeating the documentation of citizenship unless later evidence raises a question of the person's citizenship. The State need only check its databases to verify that the individual already established citizenship.
(6) CMS requires that as a check against fraud, using currently available automated capabilities, States will conduct a match of the applicant's name against the corresponding Social Security number that was provided. In addition, in cooperation with other agencies of the Federal government, CMS encourages States to use automated capabilities to verify citizenship and identity of Medicaid applicants. Automated capabilities may fall within the computer matching provisions of the Privacy Act of 1974, and CMS will explore any implementation issues that may arise with respect to those requirements. When these capabilities become available, States will be required to match files for individuals who used third or fourth tier documents to verify citizenship and documents to verify identity, and CMS will make available to States necessary information in this regard. States must ensure that all case records within this category will be so identified and made available to conduct these automated matches. CMS may also require States to match files for individuals who used first or second level documents to verify citizenship as well. CMS may provide further guidance to States with respect to actions required in a case of a negative match.
(j) Record retention. The State must retain documents in accordance with 45 CFR 74.53.
(k) Reasonable opportunity to present satisfactory documentary evidence of citizenship. States must give an applicant or beneficiary a reasonable opportunity to submit satisfactory documentary evidence of citizenship before taking action affecting the individual's eligibility for Medicaid. The time States give for submitting documentation of citizenship should be consistent with the time allowed to submit documentation to establish other facets of eligibility for which documentation is requested. (See §$sect; 435.930 and 435.911.)
[71 FR 39222, July 12, 2006, as amended at 72 FR 38691, July 13, 2007]
Effective Date Note:
At 77 FR 17206, Mar. 23, 2012, § 435.407 was amended by removing the reference “and 435.911” and adding in its place the reference “and 435.912” in (k), effective Jan. 1, 2014.

Title 42 published on 2013-10-01

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  • 2014-01-16; vol. 79 # 11 - Thursday, January 16, 2014
    1. 79 FR 2948 - Medicaid Program; State Plan Home and Community-Based Services, 5-Year Period for Waivers, Provider Payment Reassignment, and Home and Community-Based Setting Requirements for Community First Choice and Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waivers
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      DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
      Final rule.
      Effective Date: These regulations are effective on March 17, 2014.
      42 CFR Parts 430, 431, 435, 436, 440, 441 and 447

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Title 42 published on 2013-10-01

The following are ALL rules, proposed rules, and notices (chronologically) published in the Federal Register relating to 42 CFR 435 after this date.

  • 2014-01-16; vol. 79 # 11 - Thursday, January 16, 2014
    1. 79 FR 2948 - Medicaid Program; State Plan Home and Community-Based Services, 5-Year Period for Waivers, Provider Payment Reassignment, and Home and Community-Based Setting Requirements for Community First Choice and Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waivers
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
      Final rule.
      Effective Date: These regulations are effective on March 17, 2014.
      42 CFR Parts 430, 431, 435, 436, 440, 441 and 447