45 CFR 2.1 - Scope, purpose, and applicability.

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§ 2.1 Scope, purpose, and applicability.
(a) This part sets forth rules to be followed when an employee or former employee of the Department of Health and Human Services (“DHHS” or “Department”), other than an employee of the Food and Drug Administration, is requested or subpoenaed to provide testimony in a deposition, trial, or other similar proceeding concerning information acquired in the course of performing official duties or because of such person's official capacity with DHHS. This part also sets forth procedures for the handling of subpoenas duces tecum and other requests for any document in the possession of DHHS, other than the Food and Drug Administration, and for the processing of requests for certification of copies of documents. Separate regulations, 21 CFR part 20, govern the Food and Drug Administration, and those regulations are not affected by this part.
(b) It is the policy of the DHHS to provide information, data, and records to non-federal litigants to the same extent and in the same manner that they are made available to the general public and, when subject to the jurisdiction of a court or other tribunal presiding over non-federal party litigation, to follow all applicable procedural and substantive rules relating to the production of information, data, and records by a non-party. The availability of Department employees to testify in litigation not involving federal parties is governed by the Department's policy to maintain strict impartiality with respect to private litigants and to minimize the disruption of official duties.
(c) This part applies to state, local and tribal judicial, administrative, and legislative proceedings, and to federal judicial and administrative proceedings.
(d) This part does not apply to:
(1) Any civil or criminal proceedings where the United States, the Department of Health and Human Services, and any agency thereof, or any other Federal agency is a party.
(2) Congressional requests or subpoenas for testimony or documents.
(3) Consultative services and technical assistance provided by the Department of Health and Human Services, or any agency thereof, in carrying out its normal program activities.
(4) Employees serving as expert witnesses in connection with professional and consultative services as approved outside activities in accordance with 5 CFR 2635.805 and 5 CFR 5501.106. (In cases where employees are providing such outside services, they must state for the record that the testimony represents their own views and does not necessarily represent the official position of the DHHS.)
(5) Employees making appearances in their private capacity in legal or administrative proceedings that do not relate to the Department of Health and Human Services (such as cases arising out of traffic accidents, crimes, domestic relations, etc.) and not involving professional and consultative services.
(6) Any matters covered in 21 CFR part 20-,involving the Food and Drug Administration.
(7) Any civil or criminal proceedings in State court brought on behalf of the Department of Health and Human Services.
Example (1):
While on duty, an employee of the Department witnesses an incident in which a fellow employee trips on a loose piece of carpeting and sustains an injury. The injured employee brings a private tort action against the contractor installing the carpeting and the private landlord maintaining the building. The employee/witness is served with a subpoena to appear at a deposition to testify about the incident. The person seeking the testimony would not be required to obtain Agency head approval prior to requesting the testimony, because the subject of the testimony does not “relate to” the Department, within the meaning of § 2.1(d)(5).
Example (2):
While on duty, an employee of the Department witnesses a mugging while looking out the window to check the weather, and then notifies the local police of what she observed. She is subsequently subpoenaed to testify in a criminal proceeding. The local prosecutor would not be required to obtain Agency head approval prior to requiring the employee to testify, because the subject of the testimony does not “relate to” the Department, within the meaning of § 2.1(d)(5).
Example (3):
A nurse on duty at an Indian Health Service hospital emergency room treats a child who is brought in following a report of domestic violence. The nurse is subsequently served with a subpoena to testify in a criminal proceeding against one of the child's parents concerning the injuries to the child which he observed. The local prosecutor would be required to obtain Agency head approval prior to requiring the nurse to testify, because the subject of the testimony involves “information acquired in the course of performing official duties or because of the person's official capacity,” within the meaning of § 2.1(a).
Example (4):
A personnel specialist working for the Department is subpoenaed to testify concerning the meaning of entries on time and attendance records of an employee, which the requesting party received from the employee pursuant to discovery in a personal injury action brought by the employee. The party requesting the personnel specialist to appear would be required to obtain Agency head approval prior to compelling the personnel specialist to testify, because the testimony sought involves “information acquired in the course of performing official duties or because of the person's official capacity,” within the meaning of § 2.1(a).
Example (5):
A National Institutes of Health physician is subpoenaed in a private medical malpractice action to provide expert testimony in her specialty. The party requesting her testimony would be required to obtain Agency head approval prior to her testifying in response to the subpoena, because the expert testimony sought involves “information acquired in the course of performing official duties or because of the person's official capacity,” within the meaning of § 2.1(a).
[52 FR 37146, Oct. 5, 1987, as amended at 55 FR 4611, Feb. 9, 1990; 68 FR 25838, May 14, 2003]

Title 45 published on 2012-10-01

no entries appear in the Federal Register after this date.