48 CFR 9904.404-60 - Illustrations.

9904.404-60 Illustrations.
(a) Illustrations of costs which must be capitalized.
(1) Contractor has an established policy of capitalizing tangible assets which have a service life of more than 1 year and a cost of $6,000. The contractor's policy must be modified to conform to the $5,000 policy limitation on minimum acquisition cost established by the Standard.
(i) Contractor acquires a tangible capital asset with a life of 18 months at a cost of $6,500. The Standard requires that the asset be capitalized in compliance with contractor's policy as to service life.
(ii) Contractor acquires a tangible asset with a life of 18 months at a cost of $900. The asset need not be capitalized unless the contractor's revised policy establishes a minimum cost criterion below $900.
(2) Contractor has an established policy of capitalizing tangible assets which have a service life of more than 1 year and a cost of $250. Contractor acquires a tangible asset with a life of 18 months and a cost of $300. The Standard requires that, based upon contractor's policy, the asset be capitalized.
(3) Contractor establishes a major new production facility. In the process, a number of large and small items of equipment were acquired to outfit it. The contractor has an established policy of capitalizing individual items of tangible assets which have a service life of over 1 year and a cost of $500, and all items meeting these requirements were capitalized. In addition, the contractor's policy requires capitalization of an original complement which has a service life of over 1 year and a cost of $5,000. Items of durable equipment acquired for the production facility costing less than $500 each aggregated $50,000. Based upon the contractor's policy, the durable equipment items must be capitalized as the original complement of low cost equipment. (The concept of original complement applies to such items as books in a new library, impact wrenches in a new factory, work benches and racks in a new production facility, or furniture and fixtures in a new office building.)
(4) Contractor has an established policy for treating its heavy presses and their power supplies as separate asset accountability units. A power supply is replaced during the service life of the related press. The Standard requires that, based upon the contractor's policy, the new power supply be capitalized with appropriate accounting for the replaced unit.
(b) Illustrations of costs which need not be capitalized.
(1) The contractor has an established policy of capitalizing tangible assets which have a service life of 2 years and a cost of $500. The contractor acquires an asset with a useful life of 18 months and a cost of $5,000. The tangible asset should be expensed because it does not meet the 2-year criterion.
(2) The contractor establishes a new assembly line. In outfitting the line, the contractor acquires $5,000 of small tools. On similar assembly lines under similar conditions, the original complement of small tools was expensed because the complement was replaced annually as a result of loss, pilferage, breakage, and physical wear and tear. Because the unit of original complement does not meet the contractor's service life criterion for capitalization (1 year), the small tools may be expensed.
[57 FR 14153, Apr. 17, 1992, as amended at 70 FR 37706, June 30, 2005]

Title 48 published on 2014-10-01

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United States Code
U.S. Code: Title 41 - PUBLIC CONTRACTS