49 CFR 1544.211 - Use of X-ray systems.

§ 1544.211 Use of X-ray systems.
(a) TSA authorization required. No aircraft operator may use any X-ray system within the United States or under the aircraft operator's operational control outside the United States to inspect accessible property or checked baggage, unless specifically authorized under its security program. No aircraft operator may use such a system in a manner contrary to its security program. TSA authorizes aircraft operators to use X-ray systems for inspecting accessible property or checked baggage under a security program if the aircraft operator shows that—
(1) The system meets the standards for cabinet X-ray systems primarily for the inspection of baggage issued by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and published in 21 CFR 1020.40;
(2) A program for initial and recurrent training of operators of the system is established, which includes training in radiation safety, the efficient use of X-ray systems, and the identification of weapons, explosives, and incendiaries; and
(3) The system meets the imaging requirements set forth in its security program using the step wedge specified in American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) Standard F792-88 (Reapproved 1993). This standard is incorporated by reference in paragraph (g) of this section.
(b) Annual radiation survey. No aircraft operator may use any X-ray system unless, within the preceding 12 calendar months, a radiation survey is conducted that shows that the system meets the applicable performance standards in 21 CFR 1020.40.
(c) Radiation survey after installation or moving. No aircraft operator may use any X-ray system after the system has been installed at a screening point or after the system has been moved unless a radiation survey is conducted which shows that the system meets the applicable performance standards in 21 CFR 1020.40. A radiation survey is not required for an X-ray system that is designed and constructed as a mobile unit and the aircraft operator shows that it can be moved without altering its performance.
(d) Defect notice or modification order. No aircraft operator may use any X-ray system that is not in full compliance with any defect notice or modification order issued for that system by the FDA, unless the FDA has advised TSA that the defect or failure to comply does not create a significant risk of injury, including genetic injury, to any person.
(e) Signs and inspection of photographic equipment and film.
(1) At locations at which an aircraft operator uses an X-ray system to inspect accessible property the aircraft operator must ensure that a sign is posted in a conspicuous place at the screening checkpoint. At locations outside the United States at which a foreign government uses an X-ray system to inspect accessible property the aircraft operator must ensure that a sign is posted in a conspicuous place at the screening checkpoint.
(2) At locations at which an aircraft operator or TSA uses an X-ray system to inspect checked baggage the aircraft operator must ensure that a sign is posted in a conspicuous place where the aircraft operator accepts checked baggage.
(3) The signs required under this paragraph (e) must notify individuals that such items are being inspected by an X-ray and advise them to remove all X-ray, scientific, and high-speed film from accessible property and checked baggage before inspection. This sign must also advise individuals that they may request that an inspection be made of their photographic equipment and film packages without exposure to an X-ray system. If the X-ray system exposes any accessible property or checked baggage to more than one milliroentgen during the inspection, the sign must advise individuals to remove film of all kinds from their articles before inspection.
(4) If requested by individuals, their photographic equipment and film packages must be inspected without exposure to an X-ray system.
(f) Radiation survey verification after installation or moving. Each aircraft operator must maintain at least one copy of the results of the most recent radiation survey conducted under paragraph (b) or (c) of this section and must make it available for inspection upon request by TSA at each of the following locations—
(1) The aircraft operator's principal business office; and
(2) The place where the X-ray system is in operation.
(g) Incorporation by reference. The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard F792-88 (Reapproved 1993), “Standard Practice for Design and Use of Ionizing Radiation Equipment for the Detection of Items Prohibited in Controlled Access Areas,” is approved for incorporation by reference by the Director of the Federal Register pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and l CFR part 51. ASTM Standard F792-88 may be examined at the Department of Transportation (DOT) Docket, 400 Seventh Street SW, Room Plaza 401, Washington, DC 20590, or on DOT's Docket Management System (DMS) web page at http://dms.dot.gov/search (under docket number FAA-2001-8725). Copies of the standard may be examined also at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. In addition, ASTM Standard F792-88 (Reapproved 1993) may be obtained from the American Society for Testing and Materials, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA 19428-2959.
(h) Duty time limitations. Each aircraft operator must comply with the X-ray operator duty time limitations specified in its security program.
[67 FR 8364, Feb. 22, 2002, as amended at 69 FR 18803, Apr. 9, 2004]

Title 49 published on 2014-10-01

no entries appear in the Federal Register after this date.