49 CFR Part 604, Appendix C to Part 604 - Frequently Asked Questions

View PDF at GPO Pt. 604, App. C
Appendix C to Part 604—Frequently Asked Questions
(a) Applicability (49 CFR Section 604.2)
(1) Q: If the requirements of the charter rule are not applicable to me for a particular service I provide, do I have to report that service in my quarterly report?
A: No. If the service you propose to provide meets one of the exemptions contained in this section, you do not have to report the service in your quarterly report.
(2) Q: If I receive funds under 49 U.S.C. Sections 5310, 5311, 5316, or 5317, may I provide charter service for any purpose?
A: No. You may only provide charter service for “program purposes,” which is defined in this regulation as “transportation that serves the needs of either human service agencies or targeted populations (elderly, individuals with disabilities, and/or low income individuals) * * *” 49 CFR Section 604.2(e). Thus, your service only qualifies for the exemption contained in this section if the service is designed to serve the needs of targeted populations. Charter service provided to a group, however, that includes individuals who are only incidentally members of those targeted populations, is not “for program purposes” and must meet the requirements of the rule (for example, an individual chartering a vehicle to take his relatives including elderly aunts and a cousin who is a disabled veteran to a family reunion).
(3) Q: If I am providing service for program purposes under one of the FTA programs listed in 604.2.(e), do the human service organizations have to register on the FTA Charter Registration Web site?
A: No. Because the service is exempt from the charter regulations, the organization does not have to register on the FTA Charter Registration Web site.
(4) Q: What if there is an emergency such as an apartment fire or tanker truck spill that requires an immediate evacuation, but the President, Governor, or Mayor never declares it as an emergency? Can a transit agency still assist in the evacuation efforts?
A: Yes. One part of the emergency exemption is designed to allow transit agencies to participate in emergency situations without worrying about complying with the charter regulations. Since transit agencies are often uniquely positioned to respond to such emergencies, the charter regulations do not apply. This is true whether or not the emergency is officially declared.
(5) Q: Do emergency situations involve requests from the Secret Service or the police department to transport its employees?
A. Generally no. Transporting the Secret Service or police officers for non-emergency preparedness or planning exercises does not qualify for the exemption under this section. In addition, if the Secret Service or the police department requests that a transit agency provide service when there is no immediate emergency, then the transit agency must comply with the charter service regulations.
(6) Q: Can a transit agency provide transportation to transit employees for an event such as the funeral of a transit employee or the transit agency's annual picnic?
A: Yes. These events do not fall within the definition of charter, because while the service is exclusive, it is not provided at the request of a third party and it is not at a negotiated price. Furthermore, a transit agency transporting its own employees to events sponsored by the transit agency for employee morale purposes or to events directly related to internal employee relations such as a funeral of an employee, or to the transit agency's picnic, is paying for these services as part of the transit agency's own administrative overhead.
(7) Q: Is sightseeing service considered to be charter?
A: “Sightseeing” is a different type of service than charter service. “Sightseeing” service is regularly scheduled round trip service to see the sights, which is often accompanied by a narrative guide and is open to the public for a set price. Public transit agencies may not provide sightseeing service with federally funded assets or assistance because it falls outside the definition of “public transportation” under 49 U.S.C. Section 5302(a) (10), unless FTA provides written concurrence for that service as an approved incidental use. While, in general, “sightseeing” service does not constitute charter service, “sightseeing” service that also meets the definition of charter service would be prohibited, even as an incidental use.
(8) Q: If a private provider receives Federal funds from one of the listed programs in this section, does that mean the private provider cannot use its privately owned equipment to provide charter service?
A: No. A private provider may still provide charter services even though it receives Federal funds under one of the programs listed in this section. The charter regulations only apply to a private provider during the time period when it is providing public transportation services under contract with a public transit agency.
(9) Q: What does FTA mean by the phrase “non-FTA funded activities”?
A: Non-FTA funded activities are those activities that are not provided under contract or other arrangement with a public transit agency using FTA funds.
(10) Q: How does a private provider know whether an activity is FTA-funded or not?
A: The private provider should refer to the contract with the public transit agency to understand the services that are funded with Federal dollars.
(11) Q: What if the service is being provided under a capital cost of contracting scenario?
A: When a private operator receives FTA funds through capital cost of contracting, the only expenses attributed to FTA are those related to the transit service provided. The principle of capital cost of contracting is to pay for the capital portion of the privately owned assets used in public transportation (including a share of preventive maintenance costs attributable to the use of the vehicle in the contracted transit service). When a private operator uses that same privately owed vehicle in non-FTA funded service, such as charter service, the preventive maintenance and capital depreciation are not paid by FTA, so the charter rule does not apply.
(12) Q: What if the service is provided under a turn-key scenario?
A: To the extent the private charter provider is standing in the shoes of the public transit agency, the charter rules apply. Under a turn-key contract, where the private operator provides and operates a dedicated transit fleet, then the private provider must abide by the charter regulations for the transit part of its business. The charter rule would not apply, however, to other aspects of that private provider's business. FTA also recognizes that a private operator may use vehicles in its fleet interchangeably. So long as the operator is providing the number, type, and quality of vehicles contractually required to be provided exclusively for transit use and is not using FTA funds to cross-subsidize private charter service, the private operator may manage its fleet according to best business practice.
(13) Q: Does FTA's rule prohibit a private provider from providing charter service when its privately owned vehicles are not engaged in providing public transportation?
A: No. The charter rule is only applicable to the actual public transit service provided by the private operator. As stated in 49 CFR 604.2(c), the rule does not apply to the non-FTA funded activities of private charter operators. The intent of this provision was to isolate the impacts of the charter rule on private operators to those instances where they stood in the shoes of a transit agency.
(14) Q: May a private provider use vehicles whose acquisition was federally funded to provide private charter services?
A: It depends. A private provider, who is a sub-recipient or sub-grantee, when not engaged in providing public transit using federally funded vehicles, may provide charter services using federally funded vehicles only in conformance with the charter regulations. Vehicles, whose only federal funding was for accessibility equipment, are not considered to be federally funded vehicles in this context. In other words, vehicles, whose lifts are only funded under FTA programs, may be used in charter service.
(15) Q: May a public transit agency provide “seasonal service” (e.g., service May through September for the summer beach season)?
A: “Seasonal service” that is regular and continuing, available to the public, and controlled by the public transit agency meets the definition of public transportation and is not charter service. The service should have a regular schedule and be planned in the same manner as all the other routes, except that it is run only during the periods when there is sufficient demand to justify public transit service; for example, the winter ski season or summer beach season. “Seasonal service” is distinguishable from charter service provided for a special event or function that occurs on an irregular basis or for a limited duration, because the seasonal transit service is regular and continuing and the demand for service is not triggered by an event or function. In addition, “seasonal service” is generally more than a month or two, and the schedule is consistent from year to year, based on calendar or climate, rather than being scheduled around a specific event.
(b) Definitions (49 CFR Section 604.3)
(16) Q: The definition of charter service does not include demand response services, but what happens if a group of individuals request demand response service?
A: Demand response trips provide service from multiple origins to a single destination, a single origin to multiple destinations, or even multiple origins to multiple destinations. These types of trips are considered demand response transit service, not charter service, because even though a human service agency pays for the transportation of its clients, trips are scheduled and routed for the individuals in the group. Service to individuals can be identified by vehicle routing that includes multiple origins, multiple destinations, or both, based on the needs of individual members of the group, rather than the group as a whole. For example, demand response service that takes all of the members of a group home on an annual excursion to a baseball game. Some sponsored trips carried out as part of a Coordinated Human Services Transportation Plan, such as trips for Head Start, assisted living centers, or sheltered workshops may even be provided on an exclusive basis where clients of a particular agency cannot be mixed with members of the general public or clients of other agencies for safety or other reasons specific to the needs of the human service clients.
(17) Q: Is it charter if a demand response transit service carries a group of individuals with disabilities from a single origin to a single destination on a regular basis?
A: No. Daily subscription trips between a group living facility for persons with developmental disabilities to a sheltered workshop where the individuals work, or weekly trips from the group home to a recreation center is “special transportation” and not considered charter service. These trips are regular and continuous and do not meet the definition of charter.
(18) Q: If a third party requests charter service for the exclusive use of a bus or van, but the transit agency provides the service free of charge, is it charter?
A: No. The definition of charter service under 49 CFR Section 604.3(c) (1), requires a negotiated price, which implies an exchange of money. Thus, free service does not meet the negotiated price requirement. Transit agencies should note, however, that a negotiated price could be the regular fixed route fare or when a third party indirectly pays for the regular fare.
(19) Q: If a transit agency accepts a subsidy for providing shuttle service for an entire baseball season, is that charter?
A: Yes. Even though there are many baseball games over several months, the service is still to an event or function on an irregular basis or for a limited duration for which a third party pays in whole or in part. In order to provide the service, a transit agency must first provide notice to registered charter providers.
(20) Q: If a transit agency contracts with a third party to provide free shuttle service during football games for persons with disabilities, is that charter?
A: Yes. Even though the service is for persons with disabilities, the transit agency receives payment from a third party for an event or function that occurs on an irregular basis or for a limited duration. In order for a transit agency to provide the service, it must provide notice to the list of registered charter providers first.
(21) Q: What if a business park pays the transit agency to add an additional stop on its fixed route to include the business park, is that charter?
A: No. The service is not to an event or function and it does not occur on an irregular basis or for a limited duration.
(22) Q: What if a university pays the transit agency to expand its regular fixed route to include stops on the campus, is that charter?
A: No. The service is not to an event or function and it does not occur on an irregular basis or for a limited duration.
(23) Q: What if a university pays the transit agency to provide shuttle service that does not connect to the transit agency's regular routes, is that charter?
A: Yes. The service is provided at the request of a third party, the university, for the exclusive use of a bus or van by the university students and faculty for a negotiated price.
(24) Q: What if the university pays the transit agency to provide shuttle service to football games and graduation, is that charter?
A: Yes. The service is to an event or function that occurs on an irregular basis or for a limited duration. As such, in order to provide the service, a transit agency must provide notice to the list of registered charter providers.
(25) Q: What happens if a transit agency does not have fixed route service to determine whether the fare charged is a premium fare?
A: A transit agency should compare the proposed fare to what it might charge for a similar trip under a demand response scenario.
(26) Q: How can a transit agency tell if the fare is “premium”?
A: The transit agency should analyze its regular fares to determine whether the fare charged is higher than its regular fare for comparable services. For example, if the transit agency proposes to provide an express shuttle service to football games, it should look at the regular fares charged for express shuttles of similar distance elsewhere in the transit system. In addition, the service may be charter if the transit agency charges a lower fare or no fare because of a third party subsidy.
(27) Q: What if a transit agency charges a customer an up front special event fare that includes the outbound and inbound trips, is that a premium fare?
A: It depends. If the transit agency charges the outbound and inbound fares up front, but many customers don't travel both directions, then the fare may be premium. This would not be true generally for park and ride lots, where the customer parks his or her car, and, would most likely use transit to return to the same lot. Under that scenario, the transit agency may collect the regular outbound and inbound fare up front.
(28) Q: What if a transit agency wishes to create a special pass for an event or function on an irregular basis or for a limited duration that allows a customer to ride the transit system several times for the duration of the event, is that charter?
A: It depends. If the special pass costs more than the fare for a reasonable number of expected individual trips during the event, then the special pass represents a premium fare. FTA will also consider whether a third party provides a subsidy for the service.
(29) Q: Is it a third party subsidy if a third party collects the regular fixed route fare for the transit agency?
A. Generally no. If the service provided is not at the request of a third party for the exclusive use of a bus or van, then a third party collecting the fare would not qualify the service as charter. But, a transit agency has to consider carefully whether the service is at the request of an event planner. For example, a group offers to make “passes” for its organization and then later work out the payment to the transit agency. The transit agency can only collect the regular fare for each passenger.
(30) Q: If the transit agency is part of the local government and an agency within the local government pays for service to an event or function of limited duration or that occurs on an irregular basis, is that charter?
A: Yes. Since the agency pays for the charter service, whether by direct payment or transfer of funds through internal local government accounts, it represents a third party payment for charter service. Thus, the service would meet the definition of charter service under 49 CFR Section 604.3(c) (1).
(31) Q: What if an organization requests and pays for service through an in-kind payment such as paying for a new bus shelter or providing advertising, is that charter?
A: Yes. The service is provided at the request of a third party for a negotiated price, which would be the cost of a new bus shelter or advertising. The key here is the direct payment for service to an event or function. For instance, advertising that appears on buses for regular service does not make it charter.
(32) Q: Under the definition of “Government Officials,” does the government official have to currently hold an office in government?
A: Yes. In order to take advantage of the Government Official exception, the individual must hold currently a government position that is elected or appointed through a political process.
(33) Q: Does a university qualify as a QHSO?
A: No. Most universities do not have a mission of serving the needs of the elderly, persons with disabilities, or low income individuals.
(34) Q: Do the Boy Scouts of America qualify as a QHSO?
A: No. The Boy Scouts of America's mission is not to serve the needs of the elderly, persons with disabilities, or low income individuals.
(35) Q: What qualifies as indirect financial assistance?
A: The inclusion of “indirect” financial assistance as part of the definition of “recipient” covers “subrecipients.” In other words, “subrecipients” are subject to the charter regulation. FTA modified the definition of recipient in the final rule to clarify this point.
(c) Exceptions (49 CFR Subpart B)
(36) Q: In order to take advantage of the Government Officials exception, does a transit agency have to transport only elected or appointed government officials?
A: No, but there has to be at least one elected or appointed government official on the trip.
(37) Q: If a transit agency provides notice regarding a season's worth of service and some of the service will occur in less than 30 days, does a registered charter provider have to respond within 72 hours or 14 days?
A: A transit agency should provide as much notice as possible for service that occurs over several months. Thus, a transit agency should provide notice to registered charter providers more than 30 days in advance of the service, which would give registered charter provider 14 days to respond to the notice. Under pressure to begin the service sooner, the transit agency could provide a separate notice for only that portion of the service occurring in less than 30 days.
(38) Q: Does a transit agency have to contact registered charter providers in order to petition the Administrator for an event of regional or national significance?
A: Yes. A petition for an event of regional or national significance must demonstrate that not only has the public transit agency contacted registered charter providers, but also demonstrate how the transit agency will include registered charter providers in providing the service to the event of regional or national significance.
(39) Q: Where does a transit agency have to file its petition?
A: A transit agency must file the petition with the ombudsman at ombudsman.charterservice@dot.gov . FTA will file all petitions in the Petitions to the Administrator docket (FTA-2007-0022) at http://www.regulations.gov.
(40) Q: What qualifies as a unique and time sensitive event?
A: In order to petition the Administrator for a discretionary exception, a public transit agency must demonstrate that the event is unique or that circumstances are such that there is not enough time to check with registered charter providers. Events that occur on an annual basis are generally not considered unique or time sensitive.
(41) Q: Is there any particular format for quarterly reports for exceptions?
A: No. The report must contain the information required by the regulations and clearly identify the exception under which the transit agency performed the service.
(42) Q: May a transit agency lease its vehicles to one registered charter provider if there is another registered charter provider that can perform all of the requested service with private charter vehicles?
A: No. A transit agency may not lease its vehicles to one registered charter provider when there is another registered charter provider that can perform all of the requested service. In that case, the transit vehicles would enable the first registered charter provider to charge less for the service than the second registered charter provider that uses all private charter vehicles.
(43) Q: Where do I submit my reports?
A: FTA has adapted its electronic grants making system, TEAM, to include charter rule reporting. Grantees should file the required reports through TEAM. These reports will be available to the public through FTA's charter bus service Web page at: http://ftateamweb.fta.dot.gov/Teamweb/CharterRegistration/QueryCharterReport.aspx. State Departments of Transportation are responsible for filing charter reports on behalf of its subrecipients that do not have access to TEAM.
(d) Registration and Notification (49 CFR Subpart C)
(44) Q: May a private provider register to receive notice of charter service requests from all 50 States?
A: Yes. A private provider may register to receive notice from all 50 States; however, a private provider should only register for those states for which it can realistically originate service.
(45) Q: May a registered charter provider select which portions of the service it would like to provide?
A: No. A registered charter provider may not “cherry pick” the service described in the notice. In other words, if the e-mail notification describes service for an entire football season, then a registered charter provider that responds to the notice indicating it can provide only a couple of weekends of service would be non-responsive to the e-mail notice. Public transit agencies may, however, include several individual charter events in the e-mail notification. Under those circumstances, a registered charter provider may select from those individual events to provide service.
(46) Q: May a transit agency include information on “special requests” from the customer in the notice to registered charter providers?
A: No. A transit agency must strictly follow the requirements of 49 CFR Section 604.14, otherwise the notice is void. A transit agency may, however, provide a generalized statement such as “Please do not respond to this notice if you are not interested or cannot perform the service in its entirety.”
(47) Q: What happens if a transit agency sends out a notice regarding charter service, but later decides to perform the service free of charge and without a third party subsidy?
A: If a transit agency believes it may receive the authority to provide the service free of charge, with no third party subsidy, then it should send out a new e-mail notice stating that it intends to provide the service free of charge.
(48) Q: What happens if a registered charter provider initially indicates interest in providing the service described in a notice, but then later is unable to perform the service?
A: If the registered charter provider acts in good faith by providing reasonable notice to the transit agency of its changed circumstances, and that registered charter provider was the only one to respond to the notice, then the transit agency may step back in and provide the service.
(49) Q: What happens if a registered charter provider indicates interest in providing the service, but then does not contact the customer?
A: A transit agency may step back in and provide the service if the registered charter provider was the only one to respond affirmatively to the notice.
(50) Q: What happens if a registered charter provider indicates interest in providing the service, contacts the customer, and then fails to provide a price quote to the customer?
A: If the requested service is 14 days or less away, a transit agency may step back in and provide the service if the registered charter provider was the only one to respond affirmatively to the notice upon filing a complaint with FTA to remove the registered charter provider from the FTA Charter Registration Web site. If the complaint of “bad faith” negotiations is not sustained by FTA, the transit agency may face a penalty, as determined by FTA. If the requested service is more than 14 days away, and the transit agency desires to step back in, then upon filing a complaint alleging “bad faith” negotiations that is sustained by FTA, the transit agency may step back in.
(51) Q: What happens if a transit agency entered into a contract to perform charter service before the effective date of the final rule?
A: If the service described in the contract occurs after the effective date of the final rule, the service must be in conformance with the new charter regulation.
(52) Q: What if the service described in the notice requires the use of park and ride lots owned by the transit agency?
A: If the transit agency received Federal funds for those park and ride lots, then the transit agency should allow a registered charter provider to use those lots upon a showing of an acceptable incidental use (the transit agency retains satisfactory continuing control over the park and ride lot and the use does not interfere with the provision of public transportation) and if the registered charter provider signs an appropriate use and indemnification agreement.
(53) Q: What if the registered charter provider does not provide quality charter service to the customer?
A: If a registered charter provider does not provide service to the satisfaction of the customer, the customer may pursue a civil action against the registered charter provider in a court of law. If the registered charter provider also demonstrated bad faith or fraud, it can be removed from the FTA Charter Registration Web site.
(e) Complaint & Investigation Process
(54) Q: May a trade association or other operators that are unable to provide requested charter service have the right to file a complaint against the transit agency?
A: Yes. A registered charter operator or its duly authorized representative, which can include a trade association, may file a complaint under section 604.26(a). Under the new rule, a private charter operator that is not registered with FTA's charter registration Web site may not file a complaint.
(55) Q: Is there a time limit for making complaints?
A: Yes. Complaints must be filed within 90 days of the alleged unauthorized charter service.
(56) Q: Are there examples of the likely remedies FTA may impose for a violation of the charter service regulations?
A: Yes. Appendix D contains a matrix of likely remedies that FTA may impose for a violation of the charter service regulations.
(57) Q: When a complaint is filed, who is responsible for arbitration or litigation costs?
A: FTA will pay for the presiding official and the facility for the hearing, if necessary. Each party involved in the litigation is responsible for its own litigation costs.
(58) Q: What affirmative defenses might be available in the complaint process?
A: An affirmative defense to a complaint could state the applicability of one of the exceptions such as 49 CFR Section 604.6, which states that the service that was provided was within the allowable 80 hours of government official service.
(59) Q: What can a transit agency do if it believes that a registered charter provider is not bargaining in good faith with a customer?
A: If a transit agency believes that a registered charter provider is not bargaining in good faith with the customer, the transit agency may file a complaint to remove the registered charter provider from FTA's Charter Registration Web site.
(60) Q: Does a registered charter provider have to charge the same fare or rate as a public transit agency?
A: No. A registered charter provider is not under an obligation to charge the same fare or rate as public transit agency. A registered charter provider, however, must charge commercially reasonable rates.
(61) Q: What actions can a private charter operator take when it becomes aware of a transit agency's plan to engage in charter service just before the date of the charter?
A: As soon as a registered charter provider becomes aware of an upcoming charter event that it was not contacted about, then it should request an advisory opinion and cease and desist order. If the service has already occurred, then the registered charter provider may file a complaint.
(62) Q: When a registered charter provider indicates that there are no privately owned vehicles available for lease, must the public transit agency investigate independently whether the representation by the registered charter provider is accurate?
A: No. The public transit agency is not required to investigate independently whether the registered charter provider's representation is accurate unless there is reason to suspect that the registered charter provider is committing fraud. Rather, the public transit agency need only confirm that the number of vehicles owned by all registered charter providers in the geographic service area is consistent with the registered charter provider's representation.
(63) Q: How will FTA determine the remedy for a violation of the charter regulations?
A: Remedies will be based upon the facts of the situation, including but not limited to, the extent of deviation from the regulations and the economic benefit from providing the charter service. See section 604.47 and Appendix D for more details.
(64) Q: Can multiple violations in a single finding stemming from a single complaint constitute a pattern of violations?
A: Yes. A pattern of violations is defined as more than one finding of unauthorized charter service under this part by FTA beginning with the most recent finding of unauthorized charter service and looking back over a period not to exceed 72 months. While a single complaint may contain several allegations, the complaint must allege more than a single event that included unauthorized charter service in order to establish a pattern of violations.
(f) Miscellaneous
(65) Q: If a grantee operates assets that are locally funded are such assets subject to the charter regulations?
A: It depends. If a recipient receives FTA funds for operating assistance or stores its vehicles in a FTA-funded facility or receives indirect FTA assistance, then the charter regulations apply. The fact that the vehicle was locally funded does not make the recipient exempt from the charter regulations. If both operating and capital funds are locally supplied, then the vehicle is not subject to the charter service regulations.
(66) Q: What can a public transit agency do if there is a time sensitive event, such as a presidential inauguration, for which the transit agency does not have time to consult with all the private charter operators in its area?
A: 49 Section 604.11 provides a process to petition the FTA Administrator for permission to provide service for a unique and time sensitive event. A presidential inauguration, however, is not a good example of a unique and time sensitive event. A presidential inauguration is an event with substantial advance planning and a transit agency should have time to contact private operators. If the inauguration also includes ancillary events, the public transit agency should refer the customer to the registration list.
(67) Q: Are body-on-van-chassis vehicles classified as buses or vans under the charter regulation?
A: Body-on-van-chassis vehicles are treated as vans under the charter regulation.
(68) Q: When a new operator registers, may recipients continue under existing contractual agreements for charter service?
A: Yes. If the contract was signed before the new private operator registered, the arrangement can continue for up to 90 days. During that 90 day period, however, the public transit agency must enter into an agreement with the new registrant. If not, the transit agency must terminate the existing agreement for all registered charter providers.
(69) Q: Must a public transit agency continue to serve as the lead for events of regional or national significance, if after consultation with all registered charter providers, registered charter providers have enough vehicles to provide all of the service to the event?
A. No. If after consultation with registered charter providers, there is no need for the public transit vehicles, then the public transit agency may decline to serve as the lead and allow the registered charter providers to work directly with event organizers. Alternatively, the public transit entity may retain the lead and continue to coordinate with event organizers and registered charter providers.
(70) Q: What happens if a customer specifically requests a trolley from a transit agency and there are no registered charter providers that have a trolley?
A: FTA views trolleys as buses. Thus, all the privately owned buses must be engaged in service and unavailable before a transit agency may lease its trolley. Alternatively, the transit agency could enter into an agreement with all registered charter providers in its geographic service area to allow it to provide trolley charter services.
(71) Q: How does a transit agency enter into an agreement with all registered charter providers in its geographic service area?
A: A public transit agency should send an email notice to all registered charter providers of its intent to provide charter service. A registered charter provider must respond to the email notice either affirmatively or negatively. The transit agency should also indicate in the email notification that failure to respond to the email notice results in concurrence with the notification.
(72) Q: Can a registered charter provider rescind its affirmative response to an email notification?
A: Yes. If after further consideration or a change in circumstances for the registered charter provider, a registered charter provider may notify the customer and the transit agency that it is no longer interested in providing the requested charter service. At that point, the transit agency may make the decision to step back in to provide the service.
(73) Q: What happens after a registered charter provider submits a quote for charter services to a customer? Does the transit agency have to review the quote?
A: Once a registered charter provider responds affirmatively to an email notification and provides the customer a commercially reasonable quote, then the transit agency may not step back in to perform the service. A transit agency is not responsible for reviewing the quote submitted by a registered charter provider. FTA recommends that a registered charter provider include in the quote an expiration date for the offer.
[73 FR 44931, Aug. 1, 2008]

Title 49 published on 2013-10-01

no entries appear in the Federal Register after this date.