50 CFR 23.69 - How can I trade internationally in fur skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada lynx, gray wolf, and brown bear?

§ 23.69 How can I trade internationally in fur skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada lynx, gray wolf, and brown bear?
(a) U.S. and foreign general provisions. For purposes of this section, CITES furbearers means bobcat (Lynx rufus), river otter (Lontra canadensis), and Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis), and the Alaskan populations of gray wolf (Canis lupus), and brown bear (Ursus arctos). These species are included in Appendix II based on Article II(2)(b) of the Treaty (see § 23.89). The import, export, or re-export of fur skins and fur skin products must meet the requirements of this section and the other requirements of this part (see subparts B and C for prohibitions and application procedures). For specimens that were harvested from a State or Tribe without an approved CITES export program, see § 23.36 for export permits and § 23.37 for re-export certificates.
(b) Export approval of State and tribal programs. States and Tribes set up and maintain management and harvest programs designed to monitor and protect CITES furbearers from over-harvest. When a State or Tribe with a management program provides us with the necessary information, we make programmatic findings and have specific requirements that allow export under CITES. A State or Tribe must provide sufficient information for us to determine that its management program and harvest controls are appropriate to ensure that CITES furbearers harvested within its jurisdiction are legally acquired and that export will not be detrimental to the survival of the species in the wild.
(1) A State or Tribe seeking initial CITES export program approval must submit the following information to the U.S. Management Authority, except as provided in paragraph (b)(2) of this section:
(i) An assessment of the condition of the population and a description of the types of information on which the assessment is based, such as an analysis of carcass demographics, population models, analysis of past harvest levels as a function of fur prices or trapper effort, or indices of abundance independent of harvest information, such as scent station surveys, archer surveys, camera traps, track or scat surveys, or road kill counts.
(ii) Current harvest control measures, including laws regulating harvest seasons and methods.
(iii) Total allowable harvest of the species.
(iv) Distribution of harvest.
(v) Indication of how frequently harvest levels are evaluated.
(vi) Tagging or marking requirements for fur skins.
(vii) Habitat evaluation.
(viii) If available, copies of any furbearer management plans or other relevant reports that the State or Tribe has prepared as part of its existing management program.
(2) If the U.S. Scientific Authority has made a range-wide non-detriment finding for a species, a State or Tribe seeking initial approval for a CITES export program for that species need only submit the information in (b)(1)(ii) and (vi) of this section.
(3) A State or Tribe with an approved CITES export program must submit a CITES furbearer activity report to the U.S. Management Authority by October 31 of each year that provides information as to whether or not the population status or management of the species has changed within the State or tribal lands. This report may reference information provided in previous years if the information has not changed. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(4) of this section, a furbearer activity report should include, at a minimum, the following:
(i) For each species, the number of specimens taken and the number of animals tagged, if different.
(ii) An assessment of the condition of the population, including trends, and a description of the types of information on which the assessment is based. If population levels are decreasing, the activity report should include the State or Tribe's professional assessment of the reason for the decline and any steps being taken to address it.
(iii) Information on, and a copy of, any changes in laws or regulations affecting these species.
(iv) If available, copies of relevant reports that the State or Tribe has prepared during the year in question as part of its existing management programs for CITES furbearers.
(4) When the U.S. Scientific Authority has made a range-wide non-detriment finding for a species, the annual furbearer activity report from a State or Tribe with an approved export program for that species should include, at a minimum, a statement indicating whether or not the status of the species has changed and the information in paragraph (b)(3)(iii) and (iv) of this section. Range-wide non-detriment findings will be re-evaluated at least every 5 years, or sooner if information indicates that there has been a change in the status or management of the species that might lead to different treatment of the species. When a range-wide non-detriment finding is re-evaluated, States and Tribes with an approved export program for the species must submit information that allows us to determine whether our finding remains valid.
(c) CITES tags. Unless an alternative method has been approved, each CITES fur skin to be exported or re-exported must have a U.S. CITES tag permanently attached.
(1) The tag must be inserted through the skin and permanently locked in place using the locking mechanism of the tag.
(2) The legend on the CITES tag must include the US-CITES logo, an abbreviation for the State or Tribe of harvest, a standard species code assigned by the Management Authority, and a unique serial number.
(3) Fur skins with broken, cut, or missing tags may not be exported. Replacement tags must be obtained before the furs are presented for export or re-export. To obtain a replacement tag, either from the State or Tribe that issued the original tag or from us, you must provide information to show that the fur was legally acquired.
(i) When a tag is broken, cut, or missing, you may contact the State or Tribe of harvest for a replacement tag. If the State or Tribe cannot replace it, you may apply to FWS Law Enforcement for a replacement tag. If the tag is broken or cut, you must give us the tag. If the tag is missing, you must provide details concerning how the tag was lost. If we are satisfied that the fur was legally acquired, we will provide a CITES replacement tag.
(ii) A replacement tag must meet all of the requirements in paragraph (c) of this section, except the legend will include only the US-CITES logo, FWS-REPL, and a unique serial number.
(4) Tags are not required on fur skin products.
(d) Documentation requirements. The U.S. CITES export permit or an annex attached to the permit must contain all information that is given on the tag.
(e) U.S. application process. Application forms and a list of States and Tribes with approved furbearer programs can be obtained from our website or by contacting us (see § 23.7).
(1) To export fur skins taken under an approved State or tribal program, complete Form 3-200-26 and submit it to either FWS Law Enforcement or the U.S. Management Authority.
(2) To export fur skins that were not harvested under an approved program, complete Form 3-200-27 and submit it to the U.S. Management Authority.
(3) To re-export fur skins, complete Form 3-200-73 and submit it either to FWS Law Enforcement or the U.S. Management Authority.
(4) For information on issuance criteria for CITES documents, see § 23.36 for export permits and § 23.37 for re-export certificates.
(f) Conditions for export. Upon export, each fur skin, other than a fur skin product, must be clearly identified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this section.

Title 50 published on 2013-10-01

no entries appear in the Federal Register after this date.