50 CFR 23.87 - How does the United States develop documents and negotiating positions for a CoP?

§ 23.87 How does the United States develop documents and negotiating positions for a CoP?
(a) In developing documents and negotiating positions for a CoP, we:
(1) Will provide for at least one public meeting.
(2) Consult with appropriate Federal, State, and tribal agencies; foreign governmental agencies; scientists; experts; and others.
(3) Seek public comment through published Federal Register notices or postings on our website that:
(i) Solicit recommendations on potential proposals to amend the Appendices, draft resolutions, and other documents for U.S. submission to the CoP.
(ii) Announce proposals to amend the Appendices, draft resolutions, and other documents that the United States is considering submitting to the CoP.
(iii) Provide the CoP agenda and a list of the amendments to the Appendices proposed for the CoP, a summary of our proposed negotiating positions on these items, and the reasons for our proposed positions.
(4) Consider comments received in response to notices or postings provided in paragraph (a)(3) of this section.
(b) We submit the following documents to the Secretariat for consideration at the CoP:
(1) Draft resolutions and other documents at least 150 days before the CoP.
(2) Proposals to amend the Appendices at least 150 days before the CoP if we have consulted all range countries, or 330 days before the CoP if we have not consulted the range countries. For the latter, the additional time allows for the range countries to be consulted through the Secretariat.
(c) The Director may modify or suspend any of these procedures if they would interfere with the timely or appropriate development of documents for submission to the CoP and U.S. negotiating positions.
(d) We may receive additional information at a CoP or circumstances may develop that have an impact on our tentative negotiating positions. As a result, the U.S. representatives to a CoP may find it necessary to modify, reverse, or otherwise change any of those positions when to do so would be in the best interests of the United States or the conservation of the species.

Title 50 published on 2013-10-01

no entries appear in the Federal Register after this date.