7 CFR 361.3 - Declarations and labeling.

§ 361.3 Declarations and labeling.
(a) All lots of agricultural seed, vegetable seed, and screenings imported into the United States must be accompanied by a declaration from the importer of the seed or screenings. The declaration must state the kind, variety, and origin of each lot of seed or screenings and the use for which the seed or screenings are being imported.
(b) Each container of agricultural seed and vegetable seed imported into the United States for seeding (planting) purposes must be labeled to indicate the identification code or designation for the lot of seed; the name of each kind or kind and variety of agricultural seed or the name of each kind and variety of vegetable seed present in the lot in excess of 5 percent of the whole; and the designation “hybrid” when the lot contains hybrid seed. Kind and variety names used on the label shall conform to the kind and variety names used in the definitions of “agricultural seed” and “vegetable seed” in § 361.1. If any seed in the lot has been treated, each container must be further labeled, in type no smaller than 8 point, as follows:
(1) The label must indicate that the seed has been treated and provide the name of the substance or process used to treat the seed. Substance names used on the label shall be the commonly accepted coined, chemical (generic), or abbreviated chemical name.
(i) Commonly accepted coined names are commonly recognized as names of particular substances, e.g., thiram, captan, lindane, and dichlone.
(ii) Examples of commonly accepted chemical (generic) names are blue-stone, calcium carbonate, cuprous oxide, zinc hydroxide, hexachlorobenzene, and ethyl mercury acetate. The terms “mercury” or “mercurial” may be used in labeling all types of mercurials.
(iii) Examples of commonly accepted abbreviated chemical names are BHC (1,2,3,4,5,6-Hexachlorocyclohexane) and DDT (dichloro diphenyl trichloroethane).
(2) If the seed has been treated with a mercurial or similarly toxic substance harmful to humans and vertebrate animals, the label must include a representation of a skull and crossbones and a statement indicating that the seed has been treated with poison. The skull and crossbones must be at least twice the size of the type used for the information provided on the label, and the poison warning statement must be written in red letters on a background of distinctly contrasting color. Mercurials and similarly toxic substances include the following:
Aldrin, technical
Demeton
Dieldrin
p-Dimethylaminobenzenediazo sodium sulfonate
Endrin
Ethion
Heptachlor
Mercurials, all types
Parathion
Phorate
Toxaphene
O-O-Diethyl-O-(isopropyl-4-methyl-6-pyrimidyl) thiophosphate
O,O-Diethyl-S-2-(ethylthio) ethyl phosphorodithioate
(3) If the seed has been treated with a substance other than one classified as a mercurial or similarly toxic substance under paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and the amount remaining with the seed is harmful to humans or other vertebrate animals, the label must indicate that the seed is not to be used for food, feed, or oil purposes. Any amount of any substance used to treat the seed that remains with the seed will be considered harmful when the seed is in containers of more than 4 ounces, except that the following substances will not be deemed harmful when present at a rate less than the number of parts per million (p/m) indicated:
Allethrin—2 p/m
Malathion—8 p/m
Methoxyclor—2 p/m
Piperonyl butoxide—20 p/m (8 p/m on oat and sorghum)
Pyrethrins—3 p/m (1 p/m on oat and sorghum)
(c) In the case of seed in bulk, the information required under paragraph (b) of this section shall appear in the invoice or other records accompanying and pertaining to such seed. If the seed is in containers and in quantities of 20,000 pounds or more, regardless of the number of lots included, the information required on each container under paragraph (b) of this section need not be shown on each container if each container has stenciled upon it or bears a label containing a lot designation and the invoice or other records accompanying and pertaining to such seed bear the various statements required for the respective seeds.
(d) Each container of agricultural seed and vegetable seed imported into the United States for cleaning need not be labeled to show the information required under paragraph (b) of this section if:
(1) The seed is in bulk;
(2) The seed is in containers and in quantities of 20,000 pounds or more, regardless of the number of lots involved, and the invoice or other records accompanying and pertaining to the seed show that the seed is for cleaning; or
(3) The seed is in containers and in quantities of less than 20,000 pounds, and each container carries a label that bears the words “Seed for cleaning.”

Title 7 published on 2014-01-01

no entries appear in the Federal Register after this date.