[Code of Federal Regulations]
[Title 37, Volume 1]
[Revised as of July 1, 1999]
From the U.S. Government Printing Office via GPO Access
[CITE: 37CFR202.23]

[Page 448-452]
 
             TITLE 37--PATENTS, TRADEMARKS, AND COPYRIGHTS
 
                                CONGRESS
 
PART 202--REGISTRATION OF CLAIMS TO COPYRIGHT--Table of Contents
 
Sec. 202.23  Full term retention of copyright deposits.

    (a) General. (1) This section prescribes conditions under which a 
request for full term retention, under the control of the Copyright 
Office, of copyright deposits (copies, phonorecords, or identifying 
material) of published works may be made and granted or denied pursuant 
to section 704(e) of title 17 of the United States Code. Only copies, 
phonorecords, or identifying material deposited in connection with 
registration of a claim to copyright under title 17 of the United States 
Code are within the provisions of this section. Only the depositor or 
the copyright owner of record of the work identified by the copyright 
deposit, or a duly authorized agent of the depositor or copyright owner, 
may request full term retention. A fee for this service is fixed by this 
section pursuant to section 708(a)(11) of title 17 of the United States 
Code.
    (2) For purposes of this section, under the control of the Copyright 
Office shall mean within the confines of Copyright Office buildings and 
under the control of Copyright Office employees, including retention in 
a Federal records center, but does not include transfer to the Library 
of Congress collections.
    (3) For purposes of this section, full term retention means 
retention for a period of 75 years from the date of publication of the 
work identified by the particular copyright deposit which is retained.
    (4) For purposes of this section, copyright deposit or its plural 
means the copy, phonorecord, or identifying material submitted to the 
Copyright Office in connection with a published work that is 
subsequently registered and made part of the records of the Office.
    (b) Form and content of request for full term retention--(1) Forms. 
The Copyright Office does not provide printed forms for the use of 
persons requesting full term retention of copyright deposits.
    (2) Requests for full term retention must be made in writing 
addressed to the Chief, Information and Reference Division of the 
Copyright Office, and shall (i) be signed by or on behalf of the 
depositor or copyright owner of record, and (ii) clearly indicate that 
full term retention is desired.
    (3) The request for full term retention must adequately identify the 
particular copyright deposit to be retained, preferably by including the 
title used in the registration application, the name of the depositor or 
copyright owner of record, the publication date, and, if registration 
was completed earlier, the registration number.
    (c) Conditions under which requests will be granted or denied--(1) 
General. A request that meets the requirements of paragraph (b) will 
generally be granted if the copyright deposit for which full term 
retention is requested has been continuously in the custody of the 
Copyright Office and the Library of Congress has not, by the date of the 
request, selected the copyright deposit for its collections.
    (2) Time of request. The request for full term retention of a 
particular copyright deposit may be made at the time of deposit or at 
any time thereafter; however, the request will be granted only if at 
least one copy, phonorecord, or set of identifying material is in the 
custody of the Copyright Office at the time of the request. Where the 
request is made concurrent with the initial deposit of the work for 
registration, the requestor must submit one copy or phonorecord more 
than the number specified in Sec. 202.20 of 37 CFR for the particular 
work.
    (3) One deposit retained. The Copyright Office will retain no more 
than one copy, phonorecord, or set of identifying material for a given 
registered work.
    (4) Denial of request for full term retention. The Copyright Office 
reserves the right to deny the request for full term retention where:
    (i) The excessive size, fragility, or weight of the deposit would, 
in the sole discretion of the Register of Copyrights, constitute an 
unreasonable

[[Page 449]]

storage burden. The request may nevertheless be granted if, within 60 
calendar days of the original denial of the request, the requestor pays 
the reasonable administrative costs, as fixed in the particular case by 
the Register of Copyrights, of preparing acceptable identifying 
materials for retention in lieu of the actual copyright deposit;
    (ii) The Library of Congress has selected for its collections the 
single copyright deposit, or both, if two copies or phonorecords were 
deposited; or
    (iii) Retention would result in a health or safety hazard, in the 
sole judgment of the Register of Copyrights. The request may 
nevertheless be granted if, within 60 calendar days of the original 
denial of the request, the requestor pays the reasonable administrative 
costs, as fixed in the particular case by the Register of Copyrights of 
preparing acceptable identifying materials for retention in lieu of the 
actual copyright deposit.
    (d) Form of copyright deposit. If full term retention is granted, 
the Copyright Office will retain under its control the particular 
copyright deposit used to make registration for the work. Any deposit 
made on after September 19, 1978 shall satisfy the requirements of 37 
CFR 202.20 and 202.21.
    (e) Fee for full term retention. (1) Pursuant to section 708(a)(11) 
of title 17 of the United States Code, the Register of Copyrights has 
fixed the fee for full term retention, as prescribed in Sec. 201.3(d), 
for each copyright deposit granted full term retention.
    (2) A check or money order in the amount prescribed in Sec. 201.3(d) 
payable to the Register of Copyrights, must be received in the Copyright 
Office within 60 calendar days from the date of mailing of the Copyright 
Office's notification to the requestor that full term retention has been 
granted for a particular copyright deposit.
    (3) The Copyright Office will issue a receipt acknowledging payment 
of the fee and identifying the copyright deposit for which full term 
retention has been granted.
    (f) Selection by Library of Congress--(1) General. All published 
copyright deposits are available for selection by the Library of 
Congress until the Copyright Office has formally granted a request for 
full term retention. Unless the requestor has deposited the additional 
copy or phonorecord specified by paragraph (c)(2) of this section, the 
Copyright Office will not process a request for full term retention 
submitted concurrent with a copyright registration application and 
deposit, until the Library of Congress has had a reasonable amount of 
time to make its selection determination.
    (2) A request for full term retention made at the time of deposit of 
a published work does not affect the right of the Library to select one 
or both of the copyright deposits.
    (3) If one copyright deposit is selected, the second deposit, if 
any, will be used for full term retention.
    (4) If both copyright deposits are selected, or, in the case where 
the single deposit made is selected, full term retention will be granted 
only if the additional copy or phonorecord specified by paragraph (c)(2) 
was deposited.
    (g) Termination of full term storage. Full term storage will cease 
75 years after the date of publication of the work identified by the 
copyright deposit retained, and the copyright deposit will be disposed 
of in accordance with section 704, paragraphs (b) through (d), of title 
17 of the United States Code.

[52 FR 28822, Aug. 4, 1987, as amended at 60 FR 34168, June 30, 1995; 63 
FR 29139, May 28, 1998; 64 FR 29522, June 1, 1999]

 Appendix A to Part 202--Technical Guidelines Regarding Sound Physical 
                                Condition

    To be considered a copy ``of sound physical condition'' within the 
meaning of 37 CFR 202.22(d)(5), a copy shall conform to all the 
technical guidelines set out in this Appendix.
    A. Physical Condition. All portions of the copy that reproduce the 
transmission program must be:
    1. Clean: Free from dirt, marks, spots, fungus, or other smudges, 
blotches, blemishes, or distortions;
    2. Undamaged: Free from burns, blisters, tears, cuts, scratches, 
breaks, erasure, or other physical damage. The copies must also be free 
from:
    (i) Any damage that interferes with performance from the tape or 
other reproduction, including physical damage resulting from earlier 
mechanical difficulties such as cassette jamming, breaks, tangles, or 
tape overflow; and

[[Page 450]]

    (ii) Any erasures, damage causing visual or audible defects or 
distortions or any material remaining from incomplete erasure of 
previously recorded works.
    3. Unspliced: Free from splices in any part of the copy reproducing 
the transmission program, regardless of whether the splice involves the 
addition or deletion of material or is intended to repair a break or 
cut.
    4. Undeteriorated: Free from any visual or aural deterioration 
resulting from aging or exposure to climatic, atmospheric, or other 
chemical or physical conditions, including heat, cold, humidity, 
electromagnetic fields, or radiation. The copy shall also be free from 
excessive brittleness or stretching, from any visible flaking of oxide 
from the tape base or other medium, and from other visible signs of 
physical deterioration or excessive wear.
    B. Physical Appurtenances of Deposit Copy.
    1. Physical Housing of Video Tape Copy. (a) In the case of video 
tape reproduced for reel-to-reel performance, the deposit copy shall 
consist of reels of uniform size and length. The length of the reels 
will depend on both the size of the tape and its running time (the last 
reel may be shorter). (b) In the case of video tape reproduced for 
cassette, cartridge, or similar performance, the tape drive mechanism 
shall be fully operable and free from any mechanical defects.
    2. ``Leader'' or Equivalent. The copy, whether housed in reels, 
cassettes, or cartridges, shall have a leader segment both preceding the 
beginning and following the end of the recording.
    C. Visual and Aural Quality of Copy:
    1. Visual Quality. The copy should be equivalent to an evaluated 
first generation copy from an edited master tape and must reproduce a 
flawless and consistent electronic signal that meets industry standards 
for television screening.
    2. Aural Quality. The sound channels or other portions must 
reproduce a flawless and consistent electronic signal without any 
audible defects.

(17 U.S.C. 407, 408, 702)

[48 FR 37209, Aug. 17, 1983, as amended at 60 FR 34168, June 30, 1995]

Appendix B to Part 202--``Best Edition'' of Published Copyrighted Works 
             for the Collections of the Library of Congress

    The copyright law (title 17, United States Code) requires that 
copies or phonorecords deposited in the Copyright Office be of the 
``best edition'' of the work. The law states that ``The `best edition' 
of a work is the edition, published in the United States at any time 
before the date of deposit, that the Library of Congress determines to 
be most suitable for its purposes.'' (For works first published only in 
a country other than the United States, the law requires the deposit of 
the best edition as first published.)
    When two or more editions of the same version of a work have been 
published, the one of the highest quality is generally considered to be 
the best edition. In judging quality, the Library of Congress will 
adhere to the criteria set forth below in all but exceptional 
circumstances.
    Where differences between editions represent variations in 
copyrightable content, each edition is a separate version and ``best 
edition'' standards based on such differences do not apply. Each such 
version is a separate work for the purpose of the copyright law.
    The criteria to be applied in determining the best edition of each 
of several types of material are listed below in descending order of 
importance. In deciding between two editions, a criterion-by-criterion 
comparison should be made. The edition which first fails to satisfy a 
criterion is to be considered of inferior quality and will not be an 
acceptable deposit. Example: If a comparison is made between two 
hardbound editions of a book, one a trade edition printed on acid-free 
paper, and the other a specially bound edition printed on average paper, 
the former will be the best edition because the type of paper is a more 
important criterion than the binding.
    Under regulations of the Copyright Office, potential depositors may 
request authorization to deposit copies or phonorecords of other than 
the best edition of a specific work (e.g., a microform rather than a 
printed edition of a serial), by requesting ``special relief'' from the 
deposit requirements. All requests for special relief should be in 
writing and should state the reason(s) why the applicant cannot send the 
required deposit and what the applicant wishes to submit instead of the 
required deposit.

                        I. Printed Textual Matter

    A. Paper, Binding, and Packaging:
    1. Archival-quality rather than less-permanent paper.
    2. Hard cover rather than soft cover.
    3. Library binding rather than commercial binding.
    4. Trade edition rather than book club edition.
    5. Sewn rather than glue-only binding.
    6. Sewn or glued rather than stapled or spiral-bound.
    7. Stapled rather than spiral-bound or plastic-bound.
    8. Bound rather than looseleaf, except when future looseleaf 
insertions are to be issued. In the case of looseleaf materials, this 
includes the submission of all binders and indexes when they are part of 
the unit as published and offered for sale or distribution. 
Additionally, the regular and timely receipt of all appropriate 
looseleaf updates, supplements, and releases including supplemental

[[Page 451]]

binders issued to handle these expanded versions, is part of the 
requirement to properly maintain these publications.
    9. Slip-cased rather than nonslip-cased.
    10. With protective folders rather than without (for broadsides).
    11. Rolled rather than folded (for broadsides).
    12. With protective coatings rather than without (except broadsides, 
which should not be coated).
    B. Rarity:
    1. Special limited edition having the greatest number of special 
features.
    2. Other limited edition rather than trade edition.
    3. Special binding rather than trade binding.
    C. Illustrations:
    1. Illustrated rather than unillustrated.
    2. Illustrations in color rather than black and white.
    D. Special Features:
    1. With thumb notches or index tabs rather than without.
    2. With aids to use such as overlays and magnifiers rather than 
without.
    E. Size:
    1. Larger rather than smaller sizes. (Except that large-type 
editions for the partially-sighted are not required in place of editions 
employing type of more conventional size.)

                             II. Photographs

    A. Size and finish, in descending order of preference:
    1. The most widely distributed edition.
    2. 8 x 10-inch glossy print.
    3. Other size or finish.
    B. Unmounted rather than mounted.
    C. Archival-quality rather than less-permanent paper stock or 
printing process.

                          III. Motion Pictures

    Film medium is considered a better quality than any other medium. 
The formats under ``film'' and ``video formats'' are listed in 
descending order of preference:
    A. Film
    1. Preprint material with special arrangement.
    2. 35mm positive prints.
    3. 16mm positive prints.
    B. Video Formats
    1. One-inch open reel tape
    2. Betacam SP
    3. D-2
    4. Betacam
    5. Videodisc
    6. Three-quarter inch cassette
    7. One-half inch VHS cassette

                        IV. Other Graphic Matter

    A. Paper and Printing:
    1. Archival quality rather than less-permanent paper.
    2. Color rather than black and white.
    B. Size and Content:
    1. Larger rather than smaller size.
    2. In the case of cartographic works, editions with the greatest 
amount of information rather than those with less detail.
    C. Rarity:
    1. The most widely distributed edition rather than one of limited 
distribution.
    2. In the case of a work published only in a limited, numbered 
edition, one copy outside the numbered series but otherwise identical.
    3. A photographic reproduction of the original, by special 
arrangement only.
    D. Text and Other Materials:
    1. Works with annotations, accompanying tabular or textual matter, 
or other interpretative aids rather than those without them.
    E. Binding and Packaging:
    1. Bound rather than unbound.
    2. If editions have different binding, apply the criteria in I.A.2-
I.A.7, above.
    3. Rolled rather than folded.
    4. With protective coatings rather than without.

                             V. Phonorecords

    A. Compact digital disc rather than a vinyl disc.
    B. Vinyl disc rather than tape.
    C. With special enclosures rather than without.
    D. Open-reel rather than cartridge.
    E. Cartridge rather than cassette.
    F. Quadraphonic rather than stereophonic.
    G. True stereophonic rather than monaural.
    H. Monaural rather than electronically rechanneled stereo.

                        VI. Musical Compositions

    A. Fullness of Score:
    1. Vocal music:
    a. With orchestral accompaniment--
    i. Full score and parts, if any, rather than conductor's score and 
parts, if any. (In cases of compositions published only by rental, 
lease, or lending, this requirement is reduced to full score only.)
    ii. Conductor's score and parts, if any, rather than condensed score 
and parts, if any. (In cases of compositions published only by rental, 
lease, or lending, this requirement is reduced to conductor's score 
only.)
    b. Unaccompanied: Open score (each part on separate staff) rather 
than closed score (all parts condensed to two staves).
    2. Instrumental music:
    a. Full score and parts, if any, rather than conductor's score and 
parts, if any. (In cases of compositions published only by rental, 
lease, or lending, this requirement is reduced to full score only.)
    b. Conductor's score and parts, if any, rather than condensed score 
and parts, if any. (In

[[Page 452]]

cases of compositions published only by rental, lease, or lending, this 
requirement is reduced to conductor's score only.)
    B. Printing and Paper:
    1. Archival-quality rather than less-permanent paper.
    C. Binding and Packaging:
    1. Special limited editions rather than trade editions.
    2. Bound rather than unbound.
    3. If editions have different binding, apply the criteria in I.A.2-
I.A.12, above.
    4. With protective folders rather than without.

                             VII. Microforms

    A. Related Materials:
    1. With indexes, study guides, or other printed matter rather than 
without.
    B. Permanence and Appearance:
    1. Silver halide rather than any other emulsion.
    2. Positive rather than negative.
    3. Color rather than black and white.
    C. Format (newspapers and newspaper-formatted serials):
    1. Reel microfilm rather than any other microform.
    D. Format (all other materials):
    1. Microfiche rather than reel microfilm.
    2. Reel microfilm rather than microform cassetes.
    3. Microfilm cassettes rather than micro-opaque prints.
    E. Size:
    1. 35 mm rather than 16 mm.

                      VIII. Machine-Readable Copies

    A. Computer Programs
    1. With documents and other accompanying material rather than 
without.
    2. Not copy-protected rather than copy-protected (if copy-protected 
then with a backup copy of the disk(s)).
    3. Format:
    a. PC-DOS or MS-DOS (or other IBM compatible formats, such as 
XENIX):
    (i) 5\1/4\" Diskette(s).
    (ii) 3\1/2\" Diskette(s).
    (iii) Optical media, such as CD-ROM--best edition should adhere to 
prevailing NISO standards.
    b. Apple Macintosh:
    (i) 3\1/2\" Diskette(s).
    (ii) Optical media, such as CD-ROM--best edition should adhere to 
prevailing NISO standards.
    B. Computerized Information Works, Including Statistical Compendia, 
Serials, or Reference Works:
    1. With documentation and other accompanying material rather than 
without.
    2. With best edition of accompanying program rather than without.
    3. Not copy-protected rather than copy-protected (if copy-protected 
then with a backup copy of the disk(s)).
    4. Format
    a. PC-DOS or MS-DOS (or other IBM compatible formats, such as 
XENIX):
    (i) Optical media, such as CD-ROM--best edition should adhere to 
prevailing NISO standards.
    (ii) 5\1/4\" Diskette(s).
    (iii) 3\1/2\" Diskette(s).
    b. Apple Macintosh:
    (i) Optical media, such as CD-ROM--best edition should adhere to 
prevailing NISO standards.
    (ii) 3\1/2\" Diskette(s).

               IX. Works Existing in More Than One Medium

    Editions are listed below in descending order of preference.
    A. Newspapers, dissertations and theses, newspaper-formatted 
serials:
    1. Microform.
    2. Printed matter.
    B. All other materials:
    1. Printed matter.
    2. Microform.
    3. Phonorecord.

[54 FR 42299, Oct. 16, 1989, as amended at 62 FR 51603, Oct. 2, 1997]