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End-of-life notice: American Legal Ethics Library

As of March 1, 2013, the Legal Information Institute is no longer maintaining the information in the American Legal Ethics Library. It is no longer possible for us to maintain it at a level of completeness and accuracy given its staffing needs. It is very possible that we will revive it at a future time. At this point, it is in need of a complete technological renovation and reworking of the "correspondent firm" model which successfully sustained it for many years.

Many people have contributed time and effort to the project over the years, and we would like to thank them. In particular, Roger Cramton and Peter Martin not only conceived ALEL but gave much of their own labor to it. We are also grateful to Brad Wendel for his editorial contributions, to Brian Toohey and all at Jones Day for their efforts, and to all of our correspondents and contributors. Thank you.

We regret any inconvenience.

Some portions of the collection may already be severely out of date, so please be cautious in your use of this material.


Ohio Legal Ethics Narrative

VII INFORMATION ABOUT LEGAL SERVICES

7.6 RULE 7.6 POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO OBTAIN GOVERNMENT ENGAGEMENTS OR APPOINTMENTS BY JUDGES

THE NOTE TO RULE 7.6 STATES THAT MR 7.6 IS NOT ADOPTED IN OHIO BECAUSE "THE SUBSTANCE OF MODEL RULE 7.6 IS ADDRESSED BY PROVISIONS OF THE OHIO ETHICS LAW, PARTICULARLY R.C. 102.03(F) AND (G), AND OTHER CRIMINAL PROHIBITIONS RELATIVE TO BRIBERY AND ATTEMPTS TO INFLUENCE THE CONDUCT OF ELECTED OFFICIALS. A LAWYER OR LAW FIRM THAT VIOLATES THESE STATUTORY PROVISIONS WOULD BE IN VIOLATION OF OTHER PROVISIONS OF THE OHIO RULES OF PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT, SUCH AS RULE 8.4."

7.6:100 Comparative Analysis of Ohio Rule

7.6:101 Model Rule Comparison

Ohio did not adopt MR 7.6 and substituted nothing in its place. See introductory paragraph above.

7.6:102 Ohio Code Comparison

See section 7.6:101.

7.6:200 The "Pay-to-Play" Prohibition

A brief summary of MR 7.6 is as follows: MR 7.6 is limited to political contributions. If made or solicited by a lawyer or law firm, that lawyer or firm cannot accept a government legal engagement or appointment by a judge if the contribution or solicitation was made for the purpose of obtaining or being considered for such engagement or appointment. An overview of this "pay-to-play" prohibition and its pros and cons are set forth in 2 Geoffrey C. Hazard, Jr. & W. William Hodes, The Law of Lawyering §§ 60.1-60.4 (3d ed. 2001 & Supp. 2008).