AALS Section Program -- Law and Computers

Friday, January 7, 1994


Using the Internet for Scholarly Exchange: Electronic Conferences

I. Trotter Hardy

"Internet:" it's got a lot of services
Listserv's -- what are they?
How do they work?
What can you do with a listserv?
Here's one way to run an e-conference
Assessment
E-Conference Advantages
Drawbacks?
Best way to look at electronic conferences
How can you do it?
Future possibilities
In conclusion ...

"Internet:" it's got a lot of services:
Listserv's -- what are they?
How do they work?
Two functions:
What can you do with a listserv?
Here's one way to run an e-conference
Assessment
E-Conference advantages
Drawbacks?
Best way to look at electronic conferences:
How can you do it?
Future possibilities
In conclusion ...


I. Trotter Hardy
Professor I. Trotter Hardy was graduated Order of the Coif from Duke University, where he served as Article Editor for the Duke Law Journal. After graduation, he clerked for the Honorable John D. Butzner, Jr., on the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals. Following that clerkship, he joined the law faculty at the College of William & Mary, where he teaches Intellectual Property, Torts, and Law and Economics.

Professor Hardy is the author of articles on the design of computer command languages, international data flows, health law, law and computers, and several articles on copyright law.

His current research interests include the use of computerized expert systems for advising students about legal research; electronic documents and hypertext; personal computer networking and electronic communication in legal education; the use of computer bulletin board systems for the delivery of legal information; and the use of the Internet for scholarly exchange. He is the moderator of "Cyberia," an Internet discussion list dealing with the law and policy of computer networks. Professor Hardy has recently experimented with conducting on-line conferences among small groups of participants over the Internet.


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