Rule 8006. Certifying a Direct Appeal to the Court of Appeals

(a) Effective Date of a Certification. A certification of a judgment, order, or decree of a bankruptcy court for direct review in a court of appeals under 28 U.S.C. §158(d)(2) is effective when:

(1) the certification has been filed;

(2) a timely appeal has been taken under Rule 8003 or 8004; and

(3) the notice of appeal has become effective under Rule 8002.


(b) Filing the Certification. The certification must be filed with the clerk of the court where the matter is pending. For purposes of this rule, a matter remains pending in the bankruptcy court for 30 days after the effective date under Rule 8002 of the first notice of appeal from the judgment, order, or decree for which direct review is sought. A matter is pending in the district court or BAP thereafter.

(c) Joint Certification by all Appellants and Appellees. A joint certification by all the appellants and appellees under 28 U.S.C. §158(d)(2)(A) must be made by using the appropriate Official Form. The parties may supplement the certification with a short statement of the basis for the certification, which may include the information listed in subdivision (f)(2).

(d) The Court That May Make the Certification. Only the court where the matter is pending, as provided in subdivision (b), may certify a direct review on request of parties or on its own motion.

(e) Certification on the Court's own Motion.

(1) How Accomplished. A certification on the court's own motion must be set forth in a separate document. The clerk of the certifying court must serve it on the parties to the appeal in the manner required for service of a notice of appeal under Rule 8003(c)(1). The certification must be accompanied by an opinion or memorandum that contains the information required by subdivision (f)(2)(A)–(D).

(2) Supplemental Statement by a Party. Within 14 days after the court's certification, a party may file with the clerk of the certifying court a short supplemental statement regarding the merits of certification.


(f) Certification by the Court on Request.

(1) How Requested. A request by a party for certification that a circumstance specified in 28 U.S.C. §158(d)(2)(A)(i)–(iii) applies—or a request by a majority of the appellants and a majority of the appellees—must be filed with the clerk of the court where the matter is pending within 60 days after the entry of the judgment, order, or decree.

(2) Service and Contents. The request must be served on all parties to the appeal in the manner required for service of a notice of appeal under Rule 8003(c)(1), and it must include the following:

(A) the facts necessary to understand the question presented;

(B) the question itself;

(C) the relief sought;

(D) the reasons why the direct appeal should be allowed, including which circumstance specified in 28 U.S.C. §158(d)(2)(A)(i)–(iii) applies; and

(E) a copy of the judgment, order, or decree and any related opinion or memorandum.


(3) Time to File a Response or a Cross-Request. A party may file a response to the request within 14 days after the request is served, or such other time as the court where the matter is pending allows. A party may file a cross-request for certification within 14 days after the request is served, or within 60 days after the entry of the judgment, order, or decree, whichever occurs first.

(4) Oral Argument Not Required. The request, cross-request, and any response are submitted without oral argument unless the court where the matter is pending orders otherwise.

(5) Form and Service of the Certification. If the court certifies a direct appeal in response to the request, it must do so in a separate document. The certification must be served on the parties to the appeal in the manner required for service of a notice of appeal under Rule 8003(c)(1).


(g) Proceeding in the Court of Appeals Following a Certification. Within 30 days after the date the certification becomes effective under subdivision (a), a request for permission to take a direct appeal to the court of appeals must be filed with the circuit clerk in accordance with F.R.App.P. 6(c).

(Added Apr. 25, 2014, eff. Dec. 1, 2014.)

Prior Rule

A prior Rule 8006, Apr. 25, 1983, eff. Aug. 1, 1983, as amended Mar. 30, 1987, eff. Aug. 1, 1987; Apr. 30, 1991, eff. Aug. 1, 1991; Apr. 29, 1994, eff. Aug. 1, 1994; Mar. 26, 2009, eff. Dec. 1, 2009, related to record and issues on appeal, prior to revision of Part VIII, Apr. 25, 2014, eff. Dec. 1, 2014.

Committee Notes on Rules—2014

This rule is derived from former Rule 8001(f), and it provides the procedures for the certification of a direct appeal of a judgment, order, or decree of a bankruptcy court to the court of appeals under 28 U.S.C. §158(d)(2). Once a case has been certified in the bankruptcy court, the district court, or the BAP for direct appeal and a request for permission to appeal has been timely filed with the circuit clerk, the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure govern further proceedings in the court of appeals.

Subdivision (a), like the former rule, requires that an appeal be properly taken—now under Rule 8003 or 8004—before a certification for direct review in the court of appeals takes effect. This rule requires the timely filing of a notice of appeal under Rule 8002 and accounts for the delayed effectiveness of a notice of appeal under the circumstances specified in that rule. Ordinarily, a notice of appeal is effective when it is filed in the bankruptcy court. Rule 8002, however, delays the effectiveness of a notice of appeal when (1) it is filed after the announcement of a decision or order but prior to the entry of the judgment, order, or decree; or (2) it is filed after the announcement or entry of a judgment, order, or decree but before the bankruptcy court disposes of certain postjudgment motions.

When the bankruptcy court enters an interlocutory order or decree that is appealable under 28 U.S.C. §158(a)(3), certification for direct review in the court of appeals may take effect before the district court or BAP grants leave to appeal. The certification is effective when the actions specified in subdivision (a) have occurred. Rule 8004(e) provides that if the court of appeals grants permission to take a direct appeal before leave to appeal an interlocutory ruling has been granted, the authorization by the court of appeals is treated as the granting of leave to appeal.

Subdivision (b) provides that a certification must be filed in the court where the matter is pending, as determined by this subdivision. This provision modifies the former rule. Because of the prompt docketing of appeals in the district court or BAP under Rules 8003 and 8004, a matter is deemed—for purposes of this rule only—to remain pending in the bankruptcy court for 30 days after the effective date of the notice of appeal. This provision will in appropriate cases give the bankruptcy judge, who will be familiar with the matter being appealed, an opportunity to decide whether certification for direct review is appropriate. Similarly, subdivision (d) provides that only the court where the matter is then pending according to subdivision (b) may make a certification on its own motion or on the request of one or more parties.

Section 158(d)(2) provides three different ways in which an appeal may be certified for direct review. Implementing these options, the rule provides in subdivision (c) for the joint certification by all appellants and appellees; in subdivision (e) for the bankruptcy court's, district court's, or BAP's certification on its own motion; and in subdivision (f) for the bankruptcy court's, district court's, or BAP's certification on request of a party or a majority of appellants and a majority of appellees.

Subdivision (g) requires that, once a certification for direct review is made, a request to the court of appeals for permission to take a direct appeal to that court must be filed with the clerk of the court of appeals no later than 30 days after the effective date of the certification. Federal Rule of Appellate Procedure 6(c), which incorporates all of F.R.App.P. 5 except subdivision (a)(3), prescribes the procedure for requesting the permission of the court of appeals and governs proceedings that take place thereafter in that court.

Changes Made After Publication and Comment. In subdivisions (b) and (g), cross-references were added. In subdivision (f)(4), the statement regarding the inapplicability of Rule 9014 was deleted as unnecessary. A clarifying change was made to the first paragraph of the Committee Note.

References in Text

The Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure, referred to in subd. (g), are set out in the Appendix to Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure.

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