15 U.S. Code § 2401 - Congressional findings

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The Congress finds that—
(1) the rate of productivity growth in the United States has declined during four of the past six years;
(2) the decline in the rate of productivity growth has contributed to inflation, to economic stagnation, and to increasing unemployment;
(3) since 1965, the rate of productivity growth of the United States has been consistently lower than that of many industrial nations in the world, adversely affecting the competitive position of the United States in world markets;
(4) growth in productivity of the economy of the United States is essential to the social and economic welfare of the American people, and to the health of the world economy;
(5) growth in the productivity of the Nation’s economy is essential to maintain and increase employment, to stabilize the cost of living and to provide job security;
(6) mounting worldwide material shortages and their consequent inflationary results make increased efficiency in the utilization of these resources of urgent importance;
(7) sharing the fruits of productivity gains among labor, management, and owners may considerably influence productivity;
(8) the continued development of joint labor-management efforts to provide a healthy environment for collective bargaining can make a significant contribution to improve productivity and foster industrial peace;
(9) factors affecting the growth of productivity in the economy include not only the status of technology and the techniques of management but also the role of the worker in the production process and the conditions of his working life;
(10) there is a national need to identify and encourage appropriate application of capital in sectors of American economic activity in order to improve productivity;
(11) there is a national need to identify and encourage appropriate application of technology in all sectors of American economic activity in order to improve productivity;
(12) there is a national need to identify and encourage the development of social, economic, scientific, business, labor, and governmental contributions to improve productivity growth, and increased economic effectiveness in the public and private sectors of the United States; which objectives can best be accomplished through maximizing private sector and State and local development of such contributions;
(13) there is a national need to identify, study, and revise or eliminate the laws, regulations, policies, and procedures which adversely affect productivity growth and the efficient functioning of the economy;
(14) there is a national need to increase employment security through such activities as manpower planning, skill-training and retraining of workers, internal work force adjustments to avoid worker displacement, assistance to workers facing or experiencing displacement, and all other public and private programs which seek to minimize the human costs of productivity improvement, thereby diminishing resistance to workplace change and improving productivity growth;
(15) there is a national need to develop new technologies for the more effective production of goods and services;
(16) there is a national need to encourage and support efforts by qualified institutions of higher learning to identify and inaugurate programs which will improve productivity;
(17) there is a national need to develop precise, standardized measurements of productivity; and
(18) there is a national need to gather and disseminate information about methods and techniques to improve productivity.

Source

(Pub. L. 94–136, title I, § 101,Nov. 28, 1975, 89 Stat. 733.)
Short Title

Pub. L. 94–136, § 1,Nov. 28, 1975, 89 Stat. 733, provided: “That this Act [enacting this chapter, repealing section 1026 of this title, and enacting provisions set out as notes under this section] may be cited as the ‘National Productivity And Quality of Working Life Act of 1975’.”
White House Conference on Productivity

Pub. L. 97–367, Oct. 25, 1982, 96 Stat. 1761, required the President to conduct a White House Conference on Productivity not later than Oct. 25, 1983, prescribed the duties of the Conference, required the Conference to submit to the President a final report not later than 120 days after the date the Conference is called, and required the President (within 120 days after submission of the final report) to transmit to Congress his recommendations for the administrative action and legislation necessary to implement recommendations contained in the final report with which he concurs.
Executive Order No. 12089

Ex. Ord. No. 12089, Oct. 23, 1978, 43 F.R. 49773, as amended by Ex. Ord. No. 12107, Dec. 28, 1978, 44 F.R. 1055, which established the National Productivity Council and provided for its membership, functions, etc. was revoked by Ex. Ord. No. 12379, § 16, Aug. 17, 1982, 47 F.R. 36099, set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5, Government Organization and Employees.
Executive Order No. 12332

Ex. Ord. No. 12332, Nov. 10, 1981, 46 F.R. 55913, which established the National Productivity Advisory Committee, and provided for its membership, functions, etc. and was extended until Sept. 30, 1984, by Ex. Ord. No. 12399, Dec. 31, 1982, 48 F.R. 379, was revoked by Ex. Ord. No. 12534, Sept. 30, 1985, 50 F.R. 40319, formerly set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5, Government Organization and Employees.

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15 USCDescription of ChangeSession YearPublic LawStatutes at Large

 

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