16 U.S. Code § 410hh - Establishment of new areas

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The following areas are hereby established as units of the National Park System and shall be administered by the Secretary under the laws governing the administration of such lands and under the provisions of this Act:
(1)  Aniakchak National Monument, containing approximately one hundred and thirty-eight thousand acres of public lands, and Aniakchak National Preserve, containing approximately three hundred and seventy-six thousand acres of public lands, as generally depicted on map numbered ANIA–90,005, and dated October 1978. The monument and preserve shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To maintain the caldera and its associated volcanic features and landscape, including the Aniakchak River and other lakes and streams, in their natural state; to study, interpret, and assure continuation of the natural process of biological succession; to protect habitat for, and populations of, fish and wildlife, including, but not limited to, brown/grizzly bears, moose, caribou, sea lions, seals, and other marine mammals, geese, swans, and other waterfowl and in a manner consistent with the foregoing, to interpret geological and biological processes for visitors. Subsistence uses by local residents shall be permitted in the monument where such uses are traditional in accordance with the provisions of subchapter II of chapter 51 of this title.
(2) Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, containing approximately two million four hundred and fifty-seven thousand acres of public land, as generally depicted on map numbered BELA–90,005, and dated October 1978. The preserve shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To protect and interpret examples of arctic plant communities, volcanic lava flows, ash explosions, coastal formations, and other geologic processes; to protect habitat for internationally significant populations of migratory birds; to provide for archeological and paleontological study, in cooperation with Native Alaskans, of the process of plant and animal migration, including man, between North America and the Asian Continent; to protect habitat for, and populations of, fish and wildlife including, but not limited to, marine mammals, brown/grizzly bears, moose, and wolves; subject to such reasonable regulations as the Secretary may prescribe, to continue reindeer grazing use, including necessary facilities and equipment, within the areas which on January 1, 1976, were subject to reindeer grazing permits, in accordance with sound range management practices; to protect the viability of subsistence resources; and in a manner consistent with the foregoing, to provide for outdoor recreation and environmental education activities including public access for recreational purposes to the Serpentine Hot Springs area. The Secretary shall permit the continuation of customary patterns and modes of travel during periods of adequate snow cover within a one-hundred-foot right-of-way along either side of an existing route from Deering to the Taylor Highway, subject to such reasonable regulations as the Secretary may promulgate to assure that such travel is consistent with the foregoing purposes.
(3) Cape Krusenstern National Monument, containing approximately five hundred and sixty thousand acres of public lands, as generally depicted on map numbered CAKR–90,007, and dated October 1979. The monument shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To protect and interpret a series of archeological sites depicting every known cultural period in arctic Alaska; to provide for scientific study of the process of human population of the area from the Asian Continent; in cooperation with Native Alaskans, to preserve and interpret evidence of prehistoric and historic Native cultures; to protect habitat for seals and other marine mammals; to protect habitat for and populations of, birds, and other wildlife, and fish resources; and to protect the viability of subsistence resources. Subsistence uses by local residents shall be permitted in the monument in accordance with the provisions of subchapter II of chapter 51 of this title.
(4)
(a) Gates of the Arctic National Park, containing approximately seven million fifty-two thousand acres of public lands, Gates of the Arctic National Preserve, containing approximately nine hundred thousand acres of Federal lands, as generally depicted on map numbered GAAR–90,011, and dated July 1980. The park and preserve shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To maintain the wild and undeveloped character of the area, including opportunities for visitors to experience solitude, and the natural environmental integrity and scenic beauty of the mountains, forelands, rivers, lakes, and other natural features; to provide continued opportunities, including reasonable access, for mountain climbing, mountaineering, and other wilderness recreational activities; and to protect habitat for and the populations of, fish and wildlife, including, but not limited to, caribou, grizzly bears, Dall sheep, moose, wolves, and raptorial birds. Subsistence uses by local residents shall be permitted in the park, where such uses are traditional, in accordance with the provisions of subchapter II of chapter 51 of this title.
(b) Congress finds that there is a need for access for surface transportation purposes across the Western (Kobuk River) unit of the Gates of the Arctic National Preserve (from the Ambler Mining District to the Alaska Pipeline Haul Road) and the Secretary shall permit such access in accordance with the provisions of this subsection.
(c) Upon the filing of an application pursuant to section 3164 (b) and (c) of this title for a right-of-way across the Western (Kobuk River) unit of the preserve, including the Kobuk Wild and Scenic River, the Secretary shall give notice in the Federal Register of a thirty-day period for other applicants to apply for access.
(d) The Secretary and the Secretary of Transportation shall jointly prepare an environmental and economic analysis solely for the purpose of determining the most desirable route for the right-of-way and terms and conditions which may be required for the issuance of that right-of-way. This analysis shall be completed within one year and the draft thereof within nine months of the receipt of the application and shall be prepared in lieu of an environmental impact statement which would otherwise be required under section 102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act [42 U.S.C. 4332 (2)(C)]. Such analysis shall be deemed to satisfy all requirements of that Act [42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.] and shall not be subject to judicial review. Such environmental and economic analysis shall be prepared in accordance with the procedural requirements of section 3164 (e) of this title. The Secretaries in preparing the analysis shall consider the following—
(i) Alternative routes including the consideration of economically feasible and prudent alternative routes across the preserve which would result in fewer or less severe adverse impacts upon the preserve.
(ii) The environmental and social and economic impact of the right-of-way including impact upon wildlife, fish, and their habitat, and rural and traditional lifestyles including subsistence activities, and measures which should be instituted to avoid or minimize negative impacts and enhance positive impacts.
(e) Within 60 days of the completion of the environmental and economic analysis, the Secretaries shall jointly agree upon a route for issuance of the right-of-way across the preserve. Such right-of-way shall be issued in accordance with the provisions of section 3167 of this title.
(5) Kenai Fjords National Park, containing approximately five hundred and sixty-seven thousand acres of public lands, as generally depicted on map numbered KEFJ–90,007, and dated October 1978. The park shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To maintain unimpaired the scenic and environmental integrity of the Harding Icefield, its outflowing glaciers, and coastal fjords and islands in their natural state; and to protect seals, sea lions, other marine mammals, and marine and other birds and to maintain their hauling and breeding areas in their natural state, free of human activity which is disruptive to their natural processes. In a manner consistent with the foregoing, the Secretary is authorized to develop access to the Harding Icefield and to allow use of mechanized equipment on the icefield for recreation.
(6) Kobuk Valley National Park, containing approximately one million seven hundred and ten thousand acres of public lands as generally depicted on map numbered KOVA–90,009, and dated October 1979. The park shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To maintain the environmental integrity of the natural features of the Kobuk River Valley, including the Kobuk, Salmon, and other rivers, the boreal forest, and the Great Kobuk Sand Dunes, in an undeveloped state; to protect and interpret, in cooperation with Native Alaskans, archeological sites associated with Native cultures; to protect migration routes for the Arctic caribou herd; to protect habitat for, and populations of, fish and wildlife including but not limited to caribou, moose, black and grizzly bears, wolves, and waterfowl; and to protect the viability of subsistence resources. Subsistence uses by local residents shall be permitted in the park in accordance with the provisions of subchapter II of chapter 51 of this title. Except at such times when, and locations where, to do so would be inconsistent with the purposes of the park, the Secretary shall permit aircraft to continue to land at sites in the upper Salmon River watershed.
(7)
(a) Lake Clark National Park, containing approximately two million four hundred thirty-nine thousand acres of public lands, and Lake Clark National Preserve, containing approximately one million two hundred and fourteen thousand acres of public lands, as generally depicted on map numbered LACL–90,008, and dated October 1978. The park and preserve shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To protect the watershed necessary for perpetuation of the red salmon fishery in Bristol Bay; to maintain unimpaired the scenic beauty and quality of portions of the Alaska Range and the Aleutian Range, including active volcanoes, glaciers, wild rivers, lakes, waterfalls, and alpine meadows in their natural state; and to protect habitat for and populations of fish and wildlife including but not limited to caribou, Dall sheep, brown/grizzly bears, bald eagles, and peregrine falcons.
(b) No lands conveyed to the Nondalton Village Corporation shall be considered to be within the boundaries of the park or preserve; if the corporation desires to convey any such lands, the Secretary may acquire such lands with the consent of the owner, and any such lands so acquired shall become part of the park or preserve, as appropriate. Subsistence uses by local residents shall be permitted in the park where such uses are traditional in accordance with the provisions of subchapter II of chapter 51 of this title.
(8)
(a) Noatak National Preserve, containing approximately 6,477,168 acres of public lands, as generally depicted on map numbered NOAT–90,004, and dated July 1980 and the map entitled “Noatak National Preserve and Noatak Wilderness Addition” dated September 1994. The preserve shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To maintain the environmental integrity of the Noatak River and adjacent uplands within the preserve in such a manner as to assure the continuation of geological and biological processes unimpaired by adverse human activity; to protect habitat for, and populations of, fish and wildlife, including but not limited to caribou, grizzly bears, Dall sheep, moose, wolves, and for waterfowl, raptors, and other species of birds; to protect archeological resources; and in a manner consistent with the foregoing, to provide opportunities for scientific research. The Secretary may establish a board consisting of scientists and other experts in the field of arctic research in order to assist him in the encouragement and administration of research efforts within the preserve.
(b) All lands located east of centerline of the main channel of the Noatak River which are—
(1) within
(A) any area withdrawn under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act [43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.] for selection by the village of Noatak, and
(B) any village deficiency withdrawal under section 11(a)(3)(A) of such Act [43 U.S.C. 1610 (a)(3)(A)] which is adjacent to the area described in subparagraph (i)  [1] of this paragraph,
(2) adjacent to public lands within a unit of the National Park System as designated under this Act, and
(3) not conveyed to such Village or other Native Corporation before the final conveyance date, shall, on such final conveyance date, be added to and included within, the adjacent unit of the National Park System (notwithstanding the applicable acreage specified in this paragraph) and managed in the manner provided in the foregoing provisions of this paragraph. For purposes of the preceding sentence the term “final conveyance date” means the date of the conveyance of lands under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act [43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.], or by operation of this Act, to the Village of Noatak, or to any other Native Corporation which completes the entitlement of such Village or other Corporation to conveyance of lands from the withdrawals referred to in subparagraph (1).
(9) Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park, containing approximately eight million one hundred and forty-seven thousand acres of public lands, and Wrangell-Saint Elias National Preserve, containing approximately four million one hundred and seventy-one thousand acres of public lands, as generally depicted on map numbered WRST–90,007, and dated August 1980. The park and preserve shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To maintain unimpaired the scenic beauty and quality of high mountain peaks, foothills, glacial systems, lakes, and streams, valleys, and coastal landscapes in their natural state; to protect habitat for, and populations of, fish and wildlife including but not limited to caribou, brown/grizzly bears, Dall sheep, moose, wolves, trumpeter swans and other waterfowl, and marine mammals; and to provide continued opportunities, including reasonable access for mountain climbing, mountaineering, and other wilderness recreational activities. Subsistence uses by local residents shall be permitted in the park, where such uses are traditional, in accordance with the provisions of subchapter II of chapter 51 of this title.
(10) Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, containing approximately one million seven hundred and thirteen thousand acres of public lands, as generally depicted on map numbered YUCH–90,008, and dated October 1978. The preserve shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To maintain the environmental integrity of the entire Charley River basin, including streams, lakes and other natural features, in its undeveloped natural condition for public benefit and scientific study; to protect habitat for, and populations of, fish and wildlife, including but not limited to the peregrine falcons and other raptorial birds, caribou, moose, Dall sheep, grizzly bears, and wolves; and in a manner consistent with the foregoing, to protect and interpret historical sites and events associated with the gold rush on the Yukon River and the geological and paleontological history and cultural prehistory of the area. Except at such times when and locations where to do so would be inconsistent with the purposes of the preserve, the Secretary shall permit aircraft to continue to land at sites in the Upper Charley River watershed.


[1]  So in original. Probably should be “subparagraph (A)”.

Source

(Pub. L. 96–487, title II, § 201,Dec. 2, 1980, 94 Stat. 2377; Pub. L. 104–333, div. I, title III, § 302(c)(2),Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4119.)
References in Text

This Act, referred to in provision preceding par. (1) and par. (8)(b)(2), (3), is Pub. L. 96–487, Dec. 2, 1980, 94 Stat. 2371, as amended, known as the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 3101 of this title and Tables.
That Act, referred to in par. (4)(d), meaning the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, is Pub. L. 91–190, Jan. 1, 1970, 83 Stat. 852, as amended, which is classified generally to chapter 55 (§ 4321 et seq.) of Title 42, The Public Health and Welfare. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 4321 of Title 42 and Tables.
The Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, referred to in par. (8)(b)(1)(A), (3), is Pub. L. 92–203, Dec. 18, 1971, 85 Stat. 688, as amended, which is classified generally to chapter 33 (§ 1601 et seq.) of Title 43, Public Lands. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 1601 of Title 43 and Tables.
Amendments

1996—Par. (8)(a). Pub. L. 104–333substituted “approximately 6,477,168 acres” for “approximately six million four hundred and sixty thousand acres” and inserted “and the map entitled ‘Noatak National Preserve and Noatak Wilderness Addition’ dated September 1994” after “July 1980”.
Anaktuvuk Pass Land Exchange

Pub. L. 104–333, div. I, title III, § 302,Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4117, provided that:
“(a) Findings.—The Congress makes the following findings:
“(1) The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (94 Stat. 2371 [Pub. L. 96–487, see Short Title note set out under section 3101 of this title]), enacted on December 2, 1980, established Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and Gates of the Arctic Wilderness. The Village of Anaktuvuk Pass, located in the highlands of the central Brooks Range is virtually surrounded by these national park and wilderness lands and is the only Native village located within the boundary of a National Park System unit in Alaska.
“(2) Unlike most other Alaskan Native communities, the village [sic] of Anaktuvuk Pass is not located on a major river, lake, or coastline that can be used as a means of access. The residents of Anaktuvuk pass [sic] have relied increasingly on snow machines in winter and all-terrain vehicles in summer as their primary means of access to pursue caribou and other subsistence resources.
“(3) In a 1983 land exchange agreement, linear easements were reserved by the Inupiat Eskimo people for use of all-terrain vehicles across certain national park lands, mostly along stream and river banks. These linear easements proved unsatisfactory, because they provided inadequate access to subsistence resources while causing excessive environmental impact from concentrated use.
“(4) The National Park Service and the Nunamiut Corporation initiated discussions in 1985 to address concerns over the use of all-terrain vehicles on park and wilderness land. These discussions resulted in an agreement, originally executed in 1992 and thereafter amended in 1993 and 1994, among the National Park Service, Nunamiut Corporation, the City of Anaktuvuk Pass, and Arctic Slope Regional Corporation. Full effectuation of this agreement, as amended, by its terms requires ratification by the Congress.
“(b) Ratification of agreement.—
“(1) Ratification.—
“(A) In general.—The terms, conditions, procedures, covenants, reservations, and other provisions set forth in the document entitled ‘Donation, Exchange of Lands and Interests in Lands and Wilderness Redesignation Agreement Among Arctic Slope Regional Corporation, Nunamiut Corporation, City of Anaktuvuk Pass and the United States of America’ (hereinafter referred to in this section as ‘the Agreement’), executed by the parties on December 17, 1992, as amended, are hereby incorporated in this title [see Tables for classification], are ratified and confirmed, and set forth the obligations and commitments of the United States, Arctic Slope Regional Corporation, Nunamiut Corporation and the City of Anaktuvuk Pass, as a matter of Federal law.
“(B) Land acquisition.—Lands acquired by the United States pursuant to the Agreement shall be administered by the Secretary of the Interior (hereinafter referred to as the ‘Secretary’) as part of Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, subject to the laws and regulations applicable thereto.
“(2) Maps.—The maps set forth as Exhibits C1, C2, and D through I to the Agreement depict the lands subject to the conveyances, retention of surface access rights, access easements and all-terrain vehicle easements. These lands are depicted in greater detail on a map entitled ‘Land Exchange Actions, Proposed Anaktuvuk Pass Land Exchange and Wilderness Redesignation, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve’, Map No. 185/80,039, dated April 1994, and on file at the Alaska Regional Office of the National Park Service and the offices of Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve in Fairbanks, Alaska. Written legal descriptions of these lands shall be prepared and made available in the above offices. In case of any discrepancies, Map No. 185/80,039 shall be controlling.
“(c) National Park System Wilderness.—
“(1) Gates of the artic wilderness.—[Amended provisions listed in a Table of Wilderness Areas set out under section 1132 of this title.]
“(2) Noatak national preserve.—[Amended this section.]
“(3) Noatak wilderness.—[Amended provisions listed in a Table of Wilderness Areas set out under section 1132 of this title.]
“(d) Conformance With Other Law.—
“(1) Alaska native claims settlement act.—All of the lands, or interests therein, conveyed to and received by Arctic Slope Regional Corporation or Nunamiut Corporation pursuant to the Agreement shall be deemed conveyed and received pursuant to exchanges under section 22(f) of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, as amended (43 U.S.C. 1601, 1621 (f)). All of the lands or interests in lands conveyed pursuant to the Agreement shall be conveyed subject to valid existing rights.
“(2) Alaska national interest lands conservation act.—Except to the extent specifically set forth in this section or the Agreement, nothing in this section or in the Agreement shall be construed to enlarge or diminish the rights, privileges, or obligations of any person, including specifically the preference for subsistence uses and access to subsistence resources provided under the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (16 U.S.C. 3101 et seq.).”

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36 CFR - Parks, Forests, and Public Property

36 CFR Part 9 - MINERALS MANAGEMENT

 

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