16 U.S. Code § -

(a) Findings
The Congress finds the following:
(1) In the Act of March 2, 1936 (Chapter 113; 49 Stat. 1155; 16 U.S.C. 423j), Congress authorized the establishment of the Richmond National Battlefield Park, and the boundaries of the battlefield park were established to permit the inclusion of all military battlefield areas related to the battles fought during the Civil War in the vicinity of the City of Richmond, Virginia. The battlefield park originally included the area then known as the Richmond Battlefield State Park.
(2) The total acreage identified in 1936 for consideration for inclusion in the battlefield park consisted of approximately 225,000 acres in and around the City of Richmond. A study undertaken by the congressionally authorized Civil War Sites Advisory Committee determined that of these 225,000 acres, the historically significant areas relating to the campaigns against and in defense of Richmond encompass approximately 38,000 acres.
(3) In a 1996 general management plan, the National Park Service identified approximately 7,121 acres in and around the City of Richmond that satisfy the National Park Service criteria of significance, integrity, feasibility, and suitability for inclusion in the battlefield park. The National Park Service later identified an additional 186 acres for inclusion in the battlefield park.
(4) There is a national interest in protecting and preserving sites of historical significance associated with the Civil War and the City of Richmond.
(5) The Commonwealth of Virginia and its local units of government have authority to prevent or minimize adverse uses of these historic resources and can play a significant role in the protection of the historic resources related to the campaigns against and in defense of Richmond.
(6) The preservation of the New Market Heights Battlefield in the vicinity of the City of Richmond is an important aspect of American history that can be interpreted to the public. The Battle of New Market Heights represents a premier landmark in black military history as 14 black Union soldiers were awarded the Medal of Honor in recognition of their valor during the battle. According to National Park Service historians, the sacrifices of the United States Colored Troops in this battle helped to ensure the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution to abolish slavery.
(b) Purpose
It is the purpose of sections 423l–1 to 423l–6 of this title—
(1) to revise the boundaries for the Richmond National Battlefield Park based on the findings of the Civil War Sites Advisory Committee and the National Park Service; and
(2) to direct the Secretary of the Interior to work in cooperation with the Commonwealth of Virginia, the City of Richmond, other political subdivisions of the Commonwealth, other public entities, and the private sector in the management, protection, and interpretation of the resources associated with the Civil War and the Civil War battles in and around the City of Richmond, Virginia.

Source

(Pub. L. 106–511, title V, § 502,Nov. 13, 2000, 114 Stat. 2373.)
References in Text

The Act of March 2, 1936, referred to in subsec. (a)(1), is act Mar. 2, 1936, ch. 113, 49 Stat. 1155, which was classified generally to sections 423j to 423l of this title prior to repeal by Pub. L. 106–511, title V, § 507,Nov. 13, 2000, 114 Stat. 2376.
Sections 423l–1 to 423l–6 of this title, referred to in subsec. (b), was in the original “this title”, meaning title V of Pub. L. 106–511, Nov. 13, 2000, 114 Stat. 2373, which enacted sections 423l–1 to 423l–6 of this title and repealed sections 423j to 423l of this title. For complete classification of title V to the Code, see Tables.

 

LII has no control over and does not endorse any external Internet site that contains links to or references LII.