16 U.S. Code § 461 - Declaration of national policy

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It is declared that it is a national policy to preserve for public use historic sites, buildings, and objects of national significance for the inspiration and benefit of the people of the United States.

Source

(Aug. 21, 1935, ch. 593, § 1,49 Stat. 666.)
Short Title of 2006 Amendment

Pub. L. 109–338, § 1(a),Oct. 12, 2006, 120 Stat. 1783, provided that: “This Act [enacting provisions set out as a note under section 262 of Title 30, Mineral Lands and Mining, enacting provisions listed in a table of National Heritage Routes set out under this section, amending provisions formerly set out as a note under section 1244 of this title, and amending provisions listed in a table of National Heritage and River Corridors, a table of National Heritage Areas, and a table of National Heritage Partnerships set out under this section] may be cited as the ‘National Heritage Areas Act of 2006’.”
Short Title of 2005 Amendment

Pub. L. 109–156, § 1,Dec. 30, 2005, 119 Stat. 2946, provided that: “This Act [amending section 463 of this title and enacting provisions set out as a note under section 463 of this title] may be cited as the ‘Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area Improvement Act’.”
Short Title of 2000 Amendment

Pub. L. 106–291, title I, § 150(a),Oct. 11, 2000, 114 Stat. 956, provided that: “This section [enacting section 469l–2 of this title and provisions set out as a note under section 469l–2 of this title] may be cited as the ‘National Underground Railroad Freedom Center Act’.”
Short Title of 1998 Amendment

Pub. L. 105–203, § 1,July 21, 1998, 112 Stat. 678, provided that: “This Act [enacting sections 469l and 469l–1 of this title] may be cited as the ‘National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Act of 1998’.”
Short Title

Act Aug. 21, 1935, ch. 593, 49 Stat. 666, which is classified to sections 461 to 467 of this title, is popularly known as the “Historic Sites, Buildings, and Antiquities Act”.

National Historic Sites
Adams National Historic Site, Massachusetts [redesignated Adams National Historical Park by Pub. L. 105–342, § 5(e), Nov. 2, 1998, 112 Stat. 3202 (16 U.S.C. 410eee et seq.)].—Designated Dec. 9, 1946.
Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic Site, Pennsylvania.—Pub. L. 88–546, Aug. 31, 1964, 78 Stat. 752; Pub. L. 107–369, Dec. 19, 2002, 116 Stat. 3069; Pub. L. 108–352, § 16, Oct. 21, 2004, 118 Stat. 1398.
Andersonville National Historic Site, Georgia.—Pub. L. 91–465, Oct. 16, 1970, 84 Stat. 989; Pub. L. 107–357, § 1, Dec. 17, 2002, 116 Stat. 3014.
Andrew Johnson National Historic Site.—Aug. 29, 1935, ch. 801, 49 Stat. 958 (16 U.S.C. 450o–450q); Proc. No. 2554, Apr. 27, 1942, 56 Stat. 1955; Pub. L. 88–197, Dec. 11, 1963, 77 Stat. 349.
Ansley Wilcox House National Historic Site (see Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural National Historic Site, New York).
Bent’s Old Fort National Historic Site, Colorado.—Pub. L. 86–487, June 3, 1960, 74 Stat. 155.
Boston African American National Historic Site, Massachusetts.—Pub. L. 96–430, title I, Oct. 10, 1980, 94 Stat. 1845.
Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site, Kansas.—Pub. L. 102–525, title I, Oct. 26, 1992, 106 Stat. 3438.
Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site, North Carolina.—Pub. L. 90–592, Oct. 17, 1968, 82 Stat. 1968; Pub. L. 110–229, title III, § 311, May 8, 2008, 122 Stat. 769.
Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site, District of Columbia.—Pub. L. 108–192, Dec. 19, 2003, 117 Stat. 2873.
Charles Pinckney National Historic Site, South Carolina.—Pub. L. 100–421, Sept. 8, 1988, 102 Stat. 1581.
Clara Barton National Historic Site, Maryland.—Pub. L. 93–486, title I, § 101(a)(1), Oct. 26, 1974, 88 Stat. 1461.
Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site, Pennsylvania.—Pub. L. 95–625, title V, § 503, Nov. 10, 1978, 92 Stat. 3498.
Edison National Historic Site [references to Edison National Historic Site deemed to refer to the Thomas Edison National Historical Park by Pub. L. 111–11, title VII, § 7110(c)(5), Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1198, see section 410mmm of this title].—Pub. L. 87–628, Sept. 5, 1962, 76 Stat. 428; repealed by Pub. L. 111–11, title VII, § 7110(c)(4), Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1198.
Eisenhower National Historic Site.—33 F.R. 16031, Nov. 27, 1967; Pub. L. 91–133, Dec. 2, 1969, 83 Stat. 274.
Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site, New York.—Pub. L. 95–32, May 26, 1977, 91 Stat. 171; Pub. L. 105–364, Nov. 6, 1998, 112 Stat. 3300.
Eugene O’Neill National Historic Site, California.—Pub. L. 94–539, §§ 1, 2, Oct. 18, 1976, 90 Stat. 2501.
Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site, Ohio.—Pub. L. 106–164, Dec. 9, 1999, 113 Stat. 1792; Pub. L. 106–387, § 1(a) [title VII, § 777], Oct. 28, 2000, 114 Stat. 1549, 1549A–46.
First Ladies National Historic Site, Ohio.—Pub. L. 106–291, title I, § 145, Oct. 11, 2000, 114 Stat. 950.
Ford’s Theatre National Historic Site, District of Columbia.—Pub. L. 91–288, June 23, 1970, 84 Stat. 322.
Fort Bowie National Historic Site, Arizona.—Pub. L. 88–510, Aug. 30, 1964, 78 Stat. 681.
Fort Davis National Historic Site, Texas.—Pub. L. 87–213, Sept. 8, 1961, 75 Stat. 488; Pub. L. 105–355, title V, § 506, Nov. 6, 1998, 112 Stat. 3263; Pub. L. 111–11, title VII, § 7118, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1205.
Fort Laramie National Historic Site, Wyoming.—Proc. No. 2292, July 16, 1938, 53 Stat. 2461; Pub. L. 86–444, Apr. 29, 1960, 74 Stat. 83.
Fort Larned National Historic Site, Kansas.—Pub. L. 88–541, Aug. 31, 1964, 78 Stat. 748.
Fort Point National Historic Site, California.—Pub. L. 91–457, Oct. 16, 1970, 84 Stat. 970.
Fort Raleigh National Historic Site, North Carolina.—Designated Apr. 5, 1941; Pub. L. 87–148, Aug. 17, 1961, 75 Stat. 384; Pub. L. 101–603, Nov. 16, 1990, 104 Stat. 3065.
Fort Saint Marks National Historic Site, Florida.—Pub. L. 87–789, Oct. 10, 1962, 76 Stat. 807.
Fort Scott National Historic Site, Kansas.—Pub. L. 95–484, Oct. 19, 1978, 92 Stat. 1610; Pub. L. 95–625, title XII, Nov. 10, 1978, 92 Stat. 3548.
Fort Smith National Historic Site, Arkansas.—Pub. L. 87–215, Sept. 13, 1961, 75 Stat. 489.
Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site, North Dakota and Montana.—Pub. L. 89–458, June 20, 1966, 80 Stat. 211.
Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site, Massachusetts.—Pub. L. 96–87, title II, Oct. 12, 1979, 93 Stat. 664; Pub. L. 105–343, Nov. 2, 1998, 112 Stat. 3203.
Friendship Hill National Historic Site, Pennsylvania.—Pub. L. 95–625, title V, § 509, Nov. 10, 1978, 92 Stat. 3509.
Georgia O’Keeffe National Historic Site, New Mexico.—Pub. L. 96–344, § 3, Sept. 8, 1980, 94 Stat. 1133; repealed by Pub. L. 98–396, title I, Aug. 22, 1984, 98 Stat. 1387.
Golden Spike National Historic Site, Utah.—Pub. L. 89–102, July 30, 1965, 79 Stat. 426.
Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site, Montana.—Pub. L. 92–406, Aug. 25, 1972, 86 Stat. 632; Pub. L. 105–365, Nov. 6, 1998, 112 Stat. 3301.
Grey Towers National Historic Site, Pennsylvania.—Pub. L. 108–447, div. E, title III, § 348, Dec. 8, 2004, 118 Stat. 3106.
Hampton National Historic Site, Maryland.—Designated June 22, 1948.
Harry S Truman National Historic Site, Missouri.—Pub. L. 98–32, May 23, 1983, 97 Stat. 193; Pub. L. 101–105, Oct. 2, 1989, 103 Stat. 675; Pub. L. 103–184, § 1, Dec. 14, 1993, 107 Stat. 2243; Pub. L. 108–396, Oct. 30, 2004, 118 Stat. 2250.
Herbert Hoover National Historic Site, Iowa.—Pub. L. 89–119, Aug. 12, 1965, 79 Stat. 510.
Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site, New York.—Designated Jan. 15, 1944; Pub. L. 105–364, Nov. 6, 1998, 112 Stat. 3300; Pub. L. 106–147, Dec. 9, 1999, 113 Stat. 1717.
Hopewell Furnace [formerly Hopewell Village] National Historic Site, Pennsylvania.—Designated Aug. 3, 1938; redesignated Sept. 19, 1985, 50 F.R. 52385.
Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site, Arizona.—Pub. L. 89–148, Aug. 28, 1965, 79 Stat. 584.
James A. Garfield National Historic Site, Ohio.—Pub. L. 96–607, title XII, Dec. 28, 1980, 94 Stat. 3545.
Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, National Historical Site, Missouri.—Designated Dec. 21, 1935
Jimmy Carter National Historic Site, Georgia.—Pub. L. 100–206, Dec. 23, 1987, 101 Stat. 1434; Pub. L. 105–106, § 1, Nov. 20, 1997, 111 Stat. 2247.
John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site, Massachusetts.—Pub. L. 90–20, May 26, 1967, 81 Stat. 29.
John Muir National Historic Site, California.—Pub. L. 88–547, Aug. 31, 1964, 78 Stat. 753; Pub. L. 100–563, § 5, Oct. 31, 1988, 102 Stat. 2829; Pub. L. 108–385, Oct. 30, 2004, 118 Stat. 2227.
Kate Mullany National Historic Site, New York.–Pub. L. 108–438, Dec. 3, 2004, 118 Stat. 2625.
Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site, North Dakota.—Pub. L. 93–486, title I, § 101(a)(3), Oct. 26, 1974, 88 Stat. 1461; Pub. L. 101–430, § 1, Oct. 15, 1990, 104 Stat. 959.
Lincoln Home National Historic Site, Illinois.—Pub. L. 92–127, Aug. 18, 1971, 85 Stat. 347.
Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site, Arkansas.—Pub. L. 105–356, Nov. 6, 1998, 112 Stat. 3268.
Longfellow House-Washington’s Headquarters [formerly Longfellow] National Historic Site, Massachusetts.—Pub. L. 92–475, Oct. 9, 1972, 86 Stat. 791; Pub. L. 111–333, Dec. 22, 2010, 124 Stat. 3581.
Lower East Side Tenement National Historic Site, New York.—Pub. L. 105–378, title I, Nov. 12, 1998, 112 Stat. 3395.
Lyndon B. Johnson National Historic Site, Texas [redesignated Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park by Pub. L. 96–607, title VI, Dec. 3, 1980, 94 Stat. 3540 (16 U.S.C. 410kk to 410kk–2)].—Pub. L. 91–134, Dec. 2, 1969, 83 Stat. 274.
Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site, Virginia.—Pub. L. 95–625, title V, § 511, Nov. 10, 1978, 92 Stat. 3510.
Manzanar National Historic Site, California.—Pub. L. 102–248, title I, Mar. 3, 1992, 106 Stat. 40; Pub. L. 104–333, div. I, title V, § 515, Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4167.
Mar-A-Lago National Historic Site, Florida [redesignated Mar-A-Lago National Historic Landmark by Pub. L. 96–586, § 4(a)(2), Dec. 23, 1980, 94 Stat. 3386 (16 U.S.C. 467a note)].—Designated Jan. 16, 1969; Pub. L. 92–527, Oct. 21, 1972, 86 Stat. 1049; repealed by Pub. L. 96–586, § 4(a)(1), Dec. 23, 1980, 94 Stat. 3386.
Martin Luther King, Junior, National Historic Site, Georgia.—Pub. L. 96–428, Oct. 10, 1980, 94 Stat. 1839; Pub. L. 102–575, title XL, § 4024, Oct. 30, 1992, 106 Stat. 4768; Pub. L. 108–314, Oct. 5, 2004, 118 Stat. 1198.
Martin Van Buren National Historic Site, New York.—Pub. L. 93–486, title I, § 101(a)(6), Oct. 26, 1974, 88 Stat. 1462; Pub. L. 111–11, title VII, § 7112, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1201.
Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site, District of Columbia.—Pub. L. 97–329, Oct. 15, 1982, 96 Stat. 1615; Pub. L. 102–211, Dec. 11, 1991, 105 Stat. 1652.
Minidoka National Historic Site, Idaho.—Pub. L. 110–229, title III, § 313, May 8, 2008, 122 Stat. 770.
Minuteman Missile National Historic Site, South Dakota.—Pub. L. 106–115, Nov. 29, 1999, 113 Stat. 1540; Pub. L. 113–36, Sept. 18, 2013, 127 Stat. 521.
Nicodemus National Historic Site, Kansas.—Pub. L. 104–333, div. I, title V, § 512, Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4163; Pub. L. 106–176, title I, § 112, Mar. 10, 2000, 114 Stat. 27.
Ninety Six National Historic Site, South Carolina.—Pub. L. 94–393, Aug. 19, 1976, 90 Stat. 1196.
Old Philadelphia Custom House National Historic Site, Pennsylvania.—Designated May 26, 1939.
Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site, Texas [redesignated Palo Alto Battlefield National Historical Park by Pub. L. 111–11, title VII, § 7113(a)(1), Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1201 (16 U.S.C. 410nnn et seq.)].—Pub. L. 95–625, title V, § 506, Nov. 10, 1978, 92 Stat. 3500; Pub. L. 102–304, June 23, 1992, 106 Stat. 256.
President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site, Arkansas.—Pub. L. 111–11, title VII, § 7002, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1188.
Pu‘ukohola Heiau National Historic Site, Hawaii.—Pub. L. 92–388, Aug. 17, 1972, 86 Stat. 562; Pub. L. 106–510, § 3(e), Nov. 13, 2000, 114 Stat. 2364.
Ronald Reagan Boyhood Home National Historic Site, Illinois.—Pub. L. 107–137, Feb. 6, 2002, 116 Stat. 3.
Saint Gaudens National Historic Site, New Hampshire.—Pub. L. 88–543, Aug. 31, 1964, 78 Stat. 749; Pub. L. 106–491, Nov. 9, 2000, 114 Stat. 2209.
Salem Maritime National Historic Site, Massachusetts.—Designated Mar. 17, 1938; Pub. L. 100–349, June 27, 1988, 102 Stat. 659; Pub. L. 101–632, Nov. 28, 1990, 104 Stat. 4575.
San Juan National Historic Site, Puerto Rico.—Designated Feb. 14, 1949.
Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site, Colorado.—Pub. L. 106–465, Nov. 7, 2000, 114 Stat. 2019; Pub. L. 109–45, Aug. 2, 2005, 119 Stat. 445.
Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site, Massachusetts.—Pub. L. 90–282, Apr. 5, 1968, 82 Stat. 72.
Sewall-Belmont House National Historic Site, District of Columbia.—Pub. L. 93–486, title II, Oct. 26, 1974, 88 Stat. 1463.
Springfield Armory National Historic Site, Massachusetts.—Pub. L. 93–486, title I, § 101(a)(4), Oct. 26, 1974, 88 Stat. 1461.
Steamtown National Historic Site, Pennsylvania.—Pub. L. 99–500, § 101(h) [title I, §§ 1–5], Oct. 18, 1986, 100 Stat. 1783–248, and Pub. L. 99–591, § 101(h) [title I, §§ 1–5], Oct. 30, 1986, 100 Stat. 3341–248.
Thaddeus Kosciuszko Home National Historic Site, Pennsylvania.—Pub. L. 92–524, Oct. 21, 1972, 86 Stat. 1046.
Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural [formerly Ansley Wilcox House] National Historic Site, New York.—Pub. L. 89–708, Nov. 2, 1966, 80 Stat. 1101; Pub. L. 96–607, title VIII, Dec. 28, 1980, 94 Stat. 3541.
Thomas Cole National Historic Site, New York.—Pub. L. 106–146, Dec. 9, 1999, 113 Stat. 1714.
Thomas Stone National Historic Site, Maryland.—Pub. L. 95–625, title V, § 510, Nov. 10, 1978, 92 Stat. 3510.
Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, Alabama.—Pub. L. 105–355, title III, Nov. 6, 1998, 112 Stat. 3254.
Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site, Alabama.—Pub. L. 93–486, title I, § 101(a)(5), Oct. 26, 1974, 88 Stat. 1462.
Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site, Missouri.—Pub. L. 101–106, Oct. 2, 1989, 103 Stat. 677.
Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site, New York.—Designated Dec. 18, 1940.
Weir Farm National Historic Site, Connecticut.—Pub. L. 101–485, Oct. 31, 1990, 104 Stat. 1171; Pub. L. 103–449, title II, Nov. 2, 1994, 108 Stat. 4756; Pub. L. 105–363, § 1, Nov. 6, 1998, 112 Stat. 3296; Pub. L. 111–11, title VII, § 7102, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1190.
William Howard Taft National Historic Site, Ohio.—Pub. L. 91–132, Dec. 2, 1969, 83 Stat. 273; Pub. L. 107–60, Nov. 5, 2001, 115 Stat. 408.

For other historic sites included within this title, see General Index.

National Battlefield Sites
Cowpens National Battlefield Site, South Carolina.—Act Mar. 4, 1929, ch. 699, 45 Stat. 1558.
Fort Necessity National Battlefield Site, Pennsylvania.—Act Mar. 4, 1931, ch. 504, 46 Stat. 1522 [redesignated Fort Necessity National Battlefield by Pub. L. 87–134, § 3, Aug. 10, 1961, 75 Stat. 336. See section 430rr of this title].
Shenandoah Valley Battlefields National Historic District, Virginia.—Pub. L. 104–333, div. I, title VI, § 606, Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4174; Pub. L. 106–176, title I, § 115, Mar. 10, 2000, 114 Stat. 27.
Washita Battlefield National Historic Site, Oklahoma.—Pub. L. 104–333, div. I, title VI, § 607, Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4180; Pub. L. 106–176, title I, § 116, Mar. 10, 2000, 114 Stat. 27.

National Heritage and River Corridors
Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (see John H. Chafee Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor, Massachusetts and Rhode Island).
Cache La Poudre Corridor, Colorado.—Pub. L. 104–323, Oct. 19, 1996, 110 Stat. 3889; repealed by Pub. L. 111–11, title VIII, § 8002(j), Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1235.
Delaware and Lehigh National Heritage Corridor, Pennsylvania.—Pub. L. 100–692, Nov. 18, 1988, 102 Stat. 4552; Pub. L. 105–355, title IV, Nov. 6, 1998, 112 Stat. 3258; Pub. L. 108–199, div. H, § 141, Jan. 23, 2004, 118 Stat. 443; Pub. L. 111–11, title VIII, § 8202, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1292; Pub. L. 113–6, div. F, title IV, § 1404(c), Mar. 26, 2013, 127 Stat. 420; Pub. L. 113–76, div. G, title I, § 119(c), Jan. 17, 2014, 128 Stat. 314.
Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor, New York.—Pub. L. 106–554, § 1(a)(4) [div. B, title VIII], Dec. 21, 2000, 114 Stat. 2763, 2763A–295; Pub. L. 111–11, title VIII, § 8203, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1294.
Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina.—Pub. L. 109–338, title II, §§ 295–295L, Oct. 12, 2006, 120 Stat. 1832–1837.
Illinois and Michigan Canal National Heritage Corridor, Illinois.—Pub. L. 98–398, title I, Aug. 24, 1984, 98 Stat. 1456; Pub. L. 104–333, div. I, title IX, § 902, Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4204; Pub. L. 105–355, title V, § 502, Nov. 6, 1998, 112 Stat. 3261; Pub. L. 106–554, § 1(a)(4) [div. B, title I, § 126], Dec. 21, 2000, 114 Stat. 2763, 2763A–229; Pub. L. 109–338, title IV, Oct. 12, 2006, 120 Stat. 1850.
John H. Chafee Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor [formerly Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor], Massachusetts and Rhode Island.—Pub. L. 99–647, Nov. 10, 1986, 100 Stat. 3625; Pub. L. 101–441, Oct. 18, 1990, 104 Stat. 1017; Pub. L. 102–154, title I, § 118, Nov. 13, 1991, 105 Stat. 1013; Pub. L. 104–208, div. A, title I, § 101(d) [title I, § 115], Sept. 30, 1996, 110 Stat. 3009–181, 3009–201; Pub. L. 104–333, div. I, title IX, § 901, Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4201; Pub. L. 105–355, title V, § 501, Nov. 6, 1998, 112 Stat. 3261; Pub. L. 106–113, div. B, § 1000(a)(3) [title III, § 343], Nov. 29, 1999, 113 Stat. 1535, 1501A–202; Pub. L. 106–176, title I, § 121, Mar. 10, 2000, 114 Stat. 29; Pub. L. 109–338, title VII, §§ 701, 702, Oct. 12, 2006, 120 Stat. 1857; Pub. L. 111–11, title VIII, § 8204, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1295; Pub. L. 112–10, div. B, title VII, § 1767, Apr. 15, 2011, 125 Stat. 155; Pub. L. 113–6, div. F, title IV, § 1404(b), Mar. 26, 2013, 127 Stat. 420; Pub. L. 113–76, div. G, title I, § 119(b), Jan. 17, 2014, 128 Stat. 314.
Ohio & Erie Canal National Heritage Corridor, Ohio (see Ohio & Erie National Heritage Canalway, Ohio).
Quinebaug and Shetucket Rivers Valley National Heritage Corridor, Connecticut and Massachusetts.—Pub. L. 103–449, title I, Nov. 2, 1994, 108 Stat. 4752; Pub. L. 106–149, Dec. 9, 1999, 113 Stat. 1726; Pub. L. 111–11, title VIII, § 8201, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1291.
South Carolina National Heritage Corridor, South Carolina.—Pub. L. 104–333, div. II, title VI, Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4260; Pub. L. 110–229, title IV, §§ 461, 473, May 8, 2008, 122 Stat. 824, 826; Pub. L. 113–6, div. F, title IV, § 1404(a), Mar. 26, 2013, 127 Stat. 420; Pub. L. 113–76, div. G, title I, § 119(a), Jan. 17, 2014, 128 Stat. 314.

National Heritage Areas
Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area, Illinois.—Pub. L. 110–229, title IV, §§ 441–451, May 8, 2008, 122 Stat. 818–824.
Arabia Mountain National Heritage Area, Georgia.—Pub. L. 109–338, title II, §§ 231–242, Oct. 12, 2006, 120 Stat. 1795–1800.
Atchafalaya National Heritage Area, Louisiana.—Pub. L. 109–338, title II, §§ 211–221, Oct. 12, 2006, 120 Stat. 1791–1795.
Augusta Canal National Heritage Area, Georgia.—Pub. L. 104–333, div. II, title III, Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4249; Pub. L. 106–176, title II, § 203, Mar. 10, 2000, 114 Stat. 31; Pub. L. 110–229, title IV, § 461, May 8, 2008, 122 Stat. 824; Pub. L. 113–6, div. F, title IV, § 1404(a), Mar. 26, 2013, 127 Stat. 420; Pub. L. 113–76, div. G, title I, § 119(a), Jan. 17, 2014, 128 Stat. 314.
Automobile National Heritage Area, Michigan.—Pub. L. 105–355, title I, Nov. 6, 1998, 112 Stat. 3247.
Baltimore National Heritage Area, Maryland.—Pub. L. 111–11, title VIII, § 8005, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1247.
Blue Ridge National Heritage Area, North Carolina.—Pub. L. 108–108, title I, § 140, Nov. 10, 2003, 117 Stat. 1274.
Cache La Poudre River National Heritage Area, Colorado.—Pub. L. 111–11, title VIII, § 8002, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1229.
Crossroads of the American Revolution National Heritage Area, New Jersey.—Pub. L. 109–338, title II, §§ 297–297J, Oct. 12, 2006, 120 Stat. 1837–1844; Pub. L. 111–11, title VII, § 7116(i), Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1203.
Essex National Heritage Area, Massachusetts.—Pub. L. 104–333, div. II, title V, Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4257; Pub. L. 106–176, title II, § 204, Mar. 10, 2000, 114 Stat. 31; Pub. L. 110–229, title IV, § 461, May 8, 2008, 122 Stat. 824; Pub. L. 113–6, div. F, title IV, § 1404(a), Mar. 26, 2013, 127 Stat. 420; Pub. L. 113–76, div. G, title I, § 119(a), Jan. 17, 2014, 128 Stat. 314.
Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area, Kansas and Missouri.—Pub. L. 109–338, title II, §§ 261–269, Oct. 12, 2006, 120 Stat. 1807–1813.
Freedom’s Way National Heritage Area, Massachusetts and New Hampshire.—Pub. L. 111–11, title VIII, § 8006, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1253.
Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area, New York.—Pub. L. 104–333, div. II, title IX, Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4275; Pub. L. 105–83, title III, §§ 317, 324, Nov. 14, 1997, 111 Stat. 1595, 1597; Pub. L. 106–176, title II, § 206, Mar. 10, 2000, 114 Stat. 31; Pub. L. 110–229, title IV, § 461, May 8, 2008, 122 Stat. 824; Pub. L. 113–6, div. F, title IV, § 1404(a), Mar. 26, 2013, 127 Stat. 420; Pub. L. 113–76, div. G, title I, § 119(a), Jan. 17, 2014, 128 Stat. 314.
Journey Through Hallowed Ground National Heritage Area, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia.—Pub. L. 110–229, title IV, §§ 401–411, May 8, 2008, 122 Stat. 802–809.
Kenai Mountains-Turnagain Arm National Heritage Area, Alaska.—Pub. L. 111–11, title VIII, § 8010, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1282.
Lackawanna Valley National Heritage Area, Pennsylvania.—Pub. L. 106–278, title I, Oct. 6, 2000, 114 Stat. 814; Pub. L. 108–352, § 2, Oct. 21, 2004, 118 Stat. 1395; Pub. L. 113–6, div. F, title IV, § 1404(d), Mar. 26, 2013, 127 Stat. 420; Pub. L. 113–76, div. G, title I, § 119(d), Jan. 17, 2014, 128 Stat. 314.
Mississippi Delta National Heritage Area, Mississippi.—Pub. L. 111–11, title VIII, § 8008, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1267.
Mississippi Gulf Coast National Heritage Area, Mississippi.—Pub. L. 108–447, div. J, title VII, Dec. 8, 2004, 118 Stat. 3374.
Mississippi Hills National Heritage Area, Mississippi.—Pub. L. 111–11, title VIII, § 8007, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1260.
Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area, Utah.—Pub. L. 109–338, title II, §§ 251–260, Oct. 12, 2006, 120 Stat. 1800–1807.
Muscle Shoals National Heritage Area, Alabama.—Pub. L. 111–11, title VIII, § 8009, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1275.
National Aviation Heritage Area, Ohio.—Pub. L. 108–447, div. J, title V, Dec. 8, 2004, 118 Stat. 3361; Pub. L. 111–11, title VII, § 7117(d), Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1204.
National Coal Heritage Area, West Virginia.—Pub. L. 104–333, div. II, title I, Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4243; Pub. L. 106–176, title II, § 201, Mar. 10, 2000, 114 Stat. 31; Pub. L. 109–338, title IX, § 901, Oct. 12, 2006, 120 Stat. 1862; Pub. L. 110–229, title IV, §§ 461, 471, May 8, 2008, 122 Stat. 824, 825; Pub. L. 113–6, div. F, title IV, § 1404(a), Mar. 26, 2013, 127 Stat. 420; Pub. L. 113–76, div. G, title I, § 119(a), Jan. 17, 2014, 128 Stat. 314.
Niagara Falls National Heritage Area, New York.—Pub. L. 110–229, title IV, §§ 421–432, May 8, 2008, 122 Stat. 809–818.
Northern Plains National Heritage Area, North Dakota.—Pub. L. 111–11, title VIII, § 8004, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1240; Pub. L. 111–88, div. A, title I, § 120, Oct. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 2929.
Northern Rio Grande National Heritage Area, New Mexico.—Pub. L. 109–338, title II, §§ 201–209, Oct. 12, 2006, 120 Stat. 1787–1790.
Oil Region National Heritage Area, Pennsylvania.—Pub. L. 108–447, div. J, title VI, Dec. 8, 2004, 118 Stat. 3368.
Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area [formerly Steel Industry American Heritage Area], Pennsylvania.—Pub. L. 104–333, div. II, title IV, Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4252; Pub. L. 106–113, div. B, § 1000(a)(3) [title I, § 116], Nov. 29, 1999, 113 Stat. 1535, 1501A–158; Pub. L. 110–229, title IV, §§ 461, 472, May 8, 2008, 122 Stat. 824, 826; Pub. L. 113–6, div. F, title IV, § 1404(a), Mar. 26, 2013, 127 Stat. 420; Pub. L. 113–76, div. G, title I, § 119(a), Jan. 17, 2014, 128 Stat. 314.
Sangre de Cristo National Heritage Area, Colorado.—Pub. L. 111–11, title VIII, § 8001, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1224.
Schuylkill River Valley National Heritage Area, Pennsylvania.—Pub. L. 106–278, title II, Oct. 6, 2000, 114 Stat. 819.
South Park National Heritage Area, Colorado.—Pub. L. 111–11, title VIII, § 8003, Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1235.
Steel Industry American Heritage Area (see Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area, Pennsylvania).
Tennessee Civil War Heritage Area, Tennessee.—Pub. L. 104–333, div. II, title II, Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4245; Pub. L. 106–176, title II, § 202, Mar. 10, 2000, 114 Stat. 31; Pub. L. 110–229, title IV, § 461, May 8, 2008, 122 Stat. 824; Pub. L. 113–6, div. F, title IV, § 1404(a), Mar. 26, 2013, 127 Stat. 420; Pub. L. 113–76, div. G, title I, § 119(a), Jan. 17, 2014, 128 Stat. 314.
Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area, Connecticut and Massachusetts.—Pub. L. 109–338, title II, §§ 271–280B, Oct. 12, 2006, 120 Stat. 1813–1819.
Wheeling National Heritage Area, West Virginia.—Pub. L. 106–291, title I, § 157, Oct. 11, 2000, 114 Stat. 963.
Yuma Crossing National Heritage Area, Arizona.—Pub. L. 106–319, Oct. 19, 2000, 114 Stat. 1280; Pub. L. 109–318, § 1, Oct. 11, 2006, 120 Stat. 1745.

National Heritage Canalways
Ohio & Erie National Heritage Canalway, Ohio [formerly Ohio & Erie Canal National Heritage Corridor].—Pub. L. 104–333, div. II, title VIII, Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4267; Pub. L. 106–176, title II, § 205, Mar. 10, 2000, 114 Stat. 31; Pub. L. 110–229, title IV, §§ 461, 474, May 8, 2008, 122 Stat. 824, 826; Pub. L. 111–11, title VII, § 7116(j), Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1203; Pub. L. 113–6, div. F, title IV, § 1404(a), Mar. 26, 2013, 127 Stat. 420; Pub. L. 113–76, div. G, title I, § 119(a), Jan. 17, 2014, 128 Stat. 314.

National Heritage Partnerships
America’s Agricultural Heritage Partnership, Iowa.—Pub. L. 104–333, div. II, title VII, Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4264; Pub. L. 106–176, title III, § 309, Mar. 10, 2000, 114 Stat. 34; Pub. L. 110–229, title IV, § 461, May 8, 2008, 122 Stat. 824; Pub. L. 113–6, div. F, title IV, § 1404(a), Mar. 26, 2013, 127 Stat. 420; Pub. L. 113–76, div. G, title I, § 119(a), Jan. 17, 2014, 128 Stat. 314.
Champlain Valley National Heritage Partnership, New York and Vermont.—Pub. L. 109–338, title II, §§ 281–289, Oct. 12, 2006, 120 Stat. 1819–1824.

National Heritage Routes
Great Basin National Heritage Route, Nevada and Utah.—Pub. L. 109–338, title II, §§ 291–291L, Oct. 12, 2006, 120 Stat. 1824–1831.

Historic Confinement Sites

Pub. L. 109–441, Dec. 21, 2006, 120 Stat. 3288, as amended by Pub. L. 111–88, div. A, title I, § 119,Oct. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 2929, provided that:
“SECTION 1. PRESERVATION OF HISTORIC CONFINEMENT SITES.
“(a) Preservation Program.—The Secretary shall create a program within the National Park Service to encourage, support, recognize, and work in partnership with citizens, Federal agencies, State, local, and tribal governments, other public entities, educational institutions, and private nonprofit organizations for the purpose of identifying, researching, evaluating, interpreting, protecting, restoring, repairing, and acquiring historic confinement sites in order that present and future generations may learn and gain inspiration from these sites and that these sites will demonstrate the Nation’s commitment to equal justice under the law.
“(b) Grants.—
“(1) Criteria.—The Secretary, after consultation with State, local, and tribal governments, other public entities, educational institutions, and private nonprofit organizations (including organizations involved in the preservation of historic confinement sites), shall develop criteria for making grants under paragraph (2) to assist in carrying out subsection (a).
“(2) Provision of grants.—Not later than 180 days after the date on which funds are made available to carry out this Act, the Secretary shall, subject to the availability of appropriations, make grants to the entities described in paragraph (1) only in accordance with the criteria developed under that paragraph.
“(c) Property Acquisition.—
“(1) Authority.—Federal funds made available under this section may be used to acquire non-Federal property for the purposes of this section, in accordance with section 3, only if that property is within the areas described in paragraph (2).
“(2) Property descriptions.—The property referred to in paragraph (2) [probably should be “(1)”] is the following:
“(A) Jerome, depicted in Figure 7.1 of the Site Document.
“(B) Rohwer, depicted in Figure 11.2 of the Site Document.
“(C) Topaz, depicted in Figure 12.2 of the Site Document.
“(D) Honouliuli, located on the southern part of the Island of Oahu, Hawaii, and within the land area bounded by H1 to the south, Route 750 (Kunia Road) to the east, the Honouliuli Forest Reserve to the west, and Kunia town and Schofield Barracks to the north.
“(E) Heart Mountain, depicted in Figure 6.3 of the Site Document.
“(3) No effect on private property.—The authority granted in this subsection shall not constitute a Federal designation or have any effect on private property ownership.
“(d) Matching Fund Requirement.—The Secretary shall require a 50 percent non-Federal match for funds provided under this section.
“(e) Sunset of Authority.—This Act shall have no force or effect on and after the date that is 2 years after the disbursement to grantees under this section of the total amount of funds authorized to be appropriated under section 4.
“SEC. 2. DEFINITIONS.
“For purposes of this Act the following definitions apply:
“(1) Historic confinement sites.—(A) The term ‘historic confinement sites’ means the 10 internment camp sites referred to as Gila River, Granada, Heart Mountain, Jerome, Manzanar, Minidoka, Poston, Rohwer, Topaz, and Tule Lake and depicted in Figures 4.1, 5.1, 6.1, 7.1, 8.4, 9.2, 10.6, 11.2, 12.2, and 13.2, respectively, of the Site Document; and
“(B) other historically significant locations, as determined by the Secretary, where Japanese Americans were detained during World War II.
“(2) Secretary.—The term ‘Secretary’ means the Secretary of the Interior.
“(3) Site document.—The term ‘Site Document’ means the document titled ‘Confinement and Ethnicity: An Overview of World War II Japanese American Relocation Sites’, published by the Western Archeological and Conservation Center, National Park Service, in 1999.
“SEC. 3. PRIVATE PROPERTY PROTECTION.
“No Federal funds made available to carry out this Act may be used to acquire any real property or any interest in any real property without the written consent of the owner or owners of that property or interest in property.
“SEC. 4. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.
“There are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary $38,000,000 to carry out this Act. Such sums shall remain available until expended.”
Crossroads of the West Historic District

Pub. L. 106–577, title III, § 302,Dec. 28, 2000, 114 Stat. 3072, established the Crossroads of the West Historic District in Ogden, Utah, provided that the Secretary of the Interior could make grants and enter into cooperative agreements with the State of Utah, local governments, and nonprofit entities for the preparation of a plan for the development of historic, architectural, natural, cultural, and interpretive resources within the District, for implementation of projects approved by the Secretary under that development plan, for an analysis assessing measures that could be taken to encourage economic development and revitalization within the District in a manner consistent with the District’s historic character, and for assisting in the restoration, repair, rehabilitation and improvement of historic infrastructure, and the preservation and interpretation of properties, within the District, set forth the application process, and authorized appropriations.
Route 66 Corridor

Pub. L. 106–45, Aug. 10, 1999, 113 Stat. 224, as amended by Pub. L. 111–11, title VII, § 7304,Mar. 30, 2009, 123 Stat. 1218, authorized the Secretary of the Interior, acting through the Cultural Resource Programs at the National Park Service, to develop and carry out programs of technical assistance, grants, and coordination of activities for the preservation of the Route 66 corridor and authorized appropriations for these purposes.
Chesapeake Bay Initiative

Pub. L. 105–312, title V, Oct. 30, 1998, 112 Stat. 2961, as amended by Pub. L. 107–308, § 9,Dec. 2, 2002, 116 Stat. 2448; Pub. L. 111–212, title III, § 3005,July 29, 2010, 124 Stat. 2339; Pub. L. 112–74, div. E, title I, Dec. 23, 2011, 125 Stat. 991; Pub. L. 113–76, div. G, title IV, § 428,Jan. 17, 2014, 128 Stat. 345, known as the Chesapeake Bay Initiative Act of 1998, authorized Secretary of the Interior, in cooperation with Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, to create a Chesapeake Bay Gateways and Watertrails Network and to provide assistance to State and local governments in establishing this network, and authorized appropriations for these purposes.
Charleston, Arkansas, National Commemorative Site

Pub. L. 105–277, div. A, § 101(e) [title I, § 128], Oct. 21, 1998, 112 Stat. 2681–231, 2681–262, provided that:
“(a) The Congress finds that—
“(1) the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court decision of Brown v. Board of Education, which mandated an end to the segregation of public schools, was one of the most significant Court decisions in the history of the United States;
“(2) the Charleston Public School District in Charleston, Arkansas, in September, 1954, became the first previously-segregated public school district in the former Confederacy to integrate following the Brown decision;
“(3) the orderly and peaceful integration of the public schools in Charleston served as a model and inspiration in the development of the Civil Rights movement in the United States, particularly with respect to public education; and
“(4) notwithstanding the important role of the Charleston School District in the successful implementation of integrated public schools, the role of the district has not been adequately commemorated and interpreted for the benefit and understanding of the nation.
“(b) The Charleston Public School complex in Charleston, Arkansas is hereby designated as the ‘Charleston National Commemorative Site’ in commemoration of the Charleston schools’ role as the first public school district in the South to integrate following the 1954 United States Supreme Court decision, Brown v. Board of Education.
“(c) The Secretary, after consultation with the Charleston Public School District, shall establish an appropriate commemorative monument and interpretive exhibit at the Charleston National Commemorative Site to commemorate the 1954 integration of Charleston’s public schools.”
Vancouver National Historic Reserve

Pub. L. 104–333, div. I, title V, § 502,Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4154, as amended by Pub. L. 106–176, title I, § 107,Mar. 10, 2000, 114 Stat. 26; Pub. L. 107–342, § 1,Dec. 17, 2002, 116 Stat. 2891, established Vancouver National Historic Reserve, Washington, directed that Reserve be administered through general management plan submitted by National Park Service to Secretary of the Interior within 3 years after Nov. 12, 1996, developed by partnership of interests including National Park Service, Historic Preservation Office of State of Washington, Department of the Army, and City of Vancouver, Washington, and to include specific findings of Vancouver Historic Reserve Report and to meet with approval of Secretary of the Interior and Secretary of the Army, directed that plan not be deemed new unit of National Park System and not limit authority of Federal Aviation Administration, and authorized appropriations.
Great Falls Historic District, New Jersey

Pub. L. 104–333, div. I, title V, § 510,Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4158, as amended by Pub. L. 106–176, title I, § 110,Mar. 10, 2000, 114 Stat. 26, established Great Falls Historic District in Paterson, New Jersey, and included statement of purposes, definitions, development plan, and provisions relating to cooperative agreements and applications for restoration, preservation and interpretation of properties, and authorization of appropriations.
Aleutian World War II National Historic Area

Pub. L. 104–333, div. I, title V, § 513,Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4165, as amended by Pub. L. 106–176, title I, § 113,Mar. 10, 2000, 114 Stat. 27, cited as “Aleutian World War II National Historic Areas Act of 1996”, designated and preserved Aleutian World War II National Historic Area within lands owned by Ounalaska Corporation on Island of Amaknak, Alaska, set boundaries of Historic Area, set terms, conditions, and limitations, and authorized Secretary of the Interior to award grants and provide technical assistance to Ounalaska Corporation and City of Unalaska.
Maine Acadian Culture Preservation Act

Pub. L. 101–543, Nov. 8, 1990, 104 Stat. 2389, established Maine Acadian Culture Preservation Commission, prescribed duties of Commission, required Secretary of the Interior within 1 year to prepare and transmit to Congress a comprehensive study of Acadian culture in Maine, authorized cooperative agreements and establishment of Acadian Culture Center, and authorized appropriations.
Southwestern Pennsylvania Heritage Preservation Commission

Pub. L. 100–698, § 1, title I, §§ 101–105,Nov. 19, 1988, 102 Stat. 4618, as amended by Pub. L. 104–333, div. I, title VIII, § 814(d)(1)(L),Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4196; Pub. L. 106–291, title I, § 148,Oct. 11, 2000, 114 Stat. 956, provided for the establishment and staffing of the Southwestern Pennsylvania Heritage Preservation Commission and set forth its powers and functions as a means for recognizing, preserving, promoting, and interpreting the cultural heritage of the 9-county region in southwestern Pennsylvania associated with the three basic industries of iron and steel, coal, and transportation.
Historic Resources of Camden, South Carolina

Pub. L. 97–184, May 24, 1982, 96 Stat. 99, provided: “That (a) in order to assist in the preservation of the nationally significant historic resources associated with the town of Camden, South Carolina, a key location in the development of South Carolina and in military operations in the South during the American Revolution, the Secretary of the Interior is authorized, in accordance with subsection 2(e) of the Act of August 21, 1935 (49 Stat. 666) [section 462 (e) of this title], to enter into a cooperative agreement or agreements with the Camden Historical Commission, the Camden District Heritage Foundation, or other appropriate public, governmental, or private nonprofit entities pursuant to which the Secretary may assist in the protection, restoration, and interpretation of such resources for the benefit of the public.
“(b) Beginning October 1, 1982, there are hereby authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary to carry out the provisions of this Act [this note], but not to exceed $250,000.”
Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve

Pub. L. 95–625, title V, § 508,Nov. 10, 1978, 92 Stat. 3507, as amended Pub. L. 96–87, title IV, § 401(k),Oct. 12, 1979, 93 Stat. 666, provided:
“(a) [Establishment, area of reserve] There is hereby established the Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve (hereinafter referred to as the ‘reserve’), in order to preserve and protect a rural community which provides an unbroken historical record from nineteenth century exploration and settlement in Puget Sound to the present time, and to commemorate—
“(1) the first thorough exploration of the Puget Sound area, by Captain George Vancouver, in 1792;
“(2) settlement by Colonel Isaac Neff Ebey who led the first permanent settlers to Whidbey Island, quickly became an important figure in Washington Territory, and ultimately was killed by Haidahs from the Queen Charlotte Islands during a period of Indian unrest in 1857;
“(3) early active settlement during the years of the Donation Land Law (1850–1855) [Sept. 27, 1850, ch. 76, 9 Stat. 496, Feb. 14, 1853, ch. 69, 10 Stat. 158, July 17, 1854, ch. 84, 10 Stat. 305] and thereafter; and
“(4) the growth since 1883 of the historic town of Coupeville.
The reserve shall include the area of approximately eight thousand acres identified as the Central Whidbey Island Historic District.
“(b) [Comprehensive plan; transmittal to Congress] (1) To achieve the purpose of this section, the Secretary, in cooperation with the appropriate State and local units of general government, shall formulate a comprehensive plan for the protection, preservation, and interpretation of the reserve. The plan shall identify those areas or zones within the reserve which would most appropriately be devoted to—
“(A) public use and development;
“(B) historic and natural preservation; and
“(C) private use subject to appropriate local zoning ordinances designed to protect the historical rural setting.
“(2) Within eighteen months following the date of enactment of this section [Nov. 10, 1978], the Secretary shall transmit the plan to the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives.
“(c) [Cooperative agreement; land use controls; transfer of management and administration; assistance; grants, limitation of amount] At such time as the State or appropriate units of local government having jurisdiction over land use within the reserve have enacted such zoning ordinances or other land use controls which in the judgment of the Secretary will protect and preserve the historic and natural features of the area in accordance with the comprehensive plan, the Secretary may, pursuant to cooperative agreement—
“(1) transfer management and administration over all or any part of the property acquired under subsection (d) of this section to the State or appropriate units of local government;
“(2) provide technical assistance to such State or unit of local government in the management, protection, and interpretation of the reserve; and
“(3) make periodic grants, which shall be supplemental to any other funds to which the grantee may be entitled under any other provision of law, to such State or local unit of government for the annual costs of operation and maintenance, including but not limited to, salaries of personnel and the protection, preservation, and rehabilitation of the reserve except that no such grant may exceed 50 per centum of the estimated annual cost, as determined by the Secretary, of such operation and maintenance.
“(d) [Acquisition of property; administration by Secretary] The Secretary is authorized to acquire such lands and interests as he determines are necessary to accomplish the purposes of this section by donation, purchase with donated or appropriated funds, or exchange, except that the Secretary may not acquire the fee simple title to any land without the consent of the owner. The Secretary shall, in addition, give prompt and careful consideration to any offer made by an individual owning property within the historic district to sell such property, if such individual notifies the Secretary that the continued ownership of such property is causing, or would result in, undue hardship.
“Lands and interests therein so acquired shall, so long as responsibility for management and administration remains with the United States, be administered by the Secretary subject to the provisions of the Act of August 25, 1916 (39 Stat. 535) [sections 1, 2, 3, and 4 of this title], as amended and supplemented, and in a manner consistent with the purpose of this section.
“(e) [Management inconsistencies; notification; modifications; withdrawal; management by Secretary] If, after the transfer of management and administration of any lands pursuant to subsection (c) of this section, the Secretary determines that the reserve is not being managed in a manner consistent with the purposes of this section, he shall so notify the appropriate officers of the State or local unit of government to which such transfer was made and provide for a ninety-day period in which the transferee may make such modifications in applicable laws, ordinances, rules, and procedures as will be consistent with such purposes. If, upon the expiration of such ninety-day period, the Secretary determines that such modifications have not been made or are inadequate, he shall withdraw the management and administration from the transferee and he shall manage such lands in accordance with the provisions of this section.
“(f) [Authorization of appropriations] There is hereby authorized to be appropriated not to exceed $5,000,000 to carry out the provisions of this section.”
Saint Paul’s Church, Eastchester

Pub. L. 95–625, title V, § 504,Nov. 10, 1978, 92 Stat. 3498, provided:
“(a) [Acquisition of property] In order to preserve and protect Saint Paul’s Church, Eastchester, in Mount Vernon, New York, for the benefit of present and future generations, the Secretary may accept any gift or bequest of any property or structure which comprises such church and any other real or personal property located within the square bounded by South Columbus Avenue, South Third Avenue, Edison Avenue, and South Fulton Avenue, in Mount Vernon, New York, including the cemetery located within such square and any real property located within such square which was at any time a part of the old village green, now in Mount Vernon, New York.
“(b) [Administration; repairs; cooperative agreements: management protection, development and interpretation] Any property acquired under subsection (a) shall be administered by the Secretary acting through the National Park Service, in accordance with this section and provisions of law generally applicable to units of the National Park System, including the Act approved August 25, 1916 (16 U.S.C. 1 and following) [sections 1, 2, 3, and 4 of this title] and the Act approved August 21, 1935 [sections 461 to 467 of this title]. The Secretary, in carrying out the provisions of such Acts (i) shall give particular attention to assuring the completion of such structural and other repairs as he considers necessary to restore and preserve any property acquired in accordance with this section, and (ii) may enter into cooperative agreements with other public or private entities for the management, protection, development, and interpretation, in whole or in part, of the property so acquired.”
Lowell Historic Canal District, Lowell, Massachusetts

Pub. L. 93–645, Jan. 4, 1975, 88 Stat. 2330, provided that:
“Sec. 1. [Lowell Historic Canal District Commission; establishment purpose] For the purpose of preserving and interpreting for the educational and inspirational benefit of present and future generations the unique and significant contribution to our national heritage of certain historic and cultural lands, waterways, and edifices in the city of Lowell, Massachusetts (the cradle of the industrial revolution in America as well as America’s first planned industrial city) with emphasis on harnessing this unique urban environment for its educational value as well as for recreation, there is hereby established the Lowell Historic Canal District Commission (hereinafter referred to as the ‘Commission’), the purpose of which shall be to prepare a plan for the preservation, interpretation, development, and use, by public and private entities, of the historic, cultural, and architectural resources of the Lowell Historic Canal District in the city of Lowell, Massachusetts.
“Sec. 2. [Membership; alternate members; compensation] (a) The Commission shall consist of nine members, as follows:
“(1) the Secretary of the Interior, the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, the Secretary of Transportation, and the Secretary of Commerce, all ex officio; and
“(2) five members appointed by the Secretary of the Interior, one of whom shall be the Director of the National Park Service, two of whom shall be appointed from recommendations submitted by the manager of the city of Lowell, and two of whom shall be appointed from recommendations submitted by the Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The members appointed pursuant to this paragraph shall have knowledge and experience in one or more of the fields of history, architecture, the arts, recreation planning, city planning, or government.
“(b) Each member of the Commission specified in paragraph (1) of subsection (a) and the Director of the National Park Service may designate an alternate official to serve in his stead. Members appointed pursuant to paragraph (2) of subsection (a) who are officers or employees of the Federal Government, the city of Lowell, or the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, shall serve without compensation as such. Other members, when engaged in activities of the Commission, shall be entitled to compensation at the rate of not to exceed $100 per diem. All members of the Commission shall receive reimbursement for necessary travel and subsistence expenses incurred by them in the performance of the duties of the Commission.
“Sec. 3. [Personnel; financial and administrative services] (a) The Commission shall elect a Chairman from among its members. Financial and administrative services (including those relating to budgeting, accounting, financial reporting, personnel, and procurement) shall be provided for the Commission by the General Services Administration, for which payments shall be made in advance, or by reimbursement, from funds of the Commission in such amounts as may be agreed upon by the Chairman of the Commission and the Administrator, General Services Administration: Provided, That the regulations of the Department of the Interior for the collection of indebtedness of personnel resulting from erroneous payments shall apply to the collection of erroneous payments made to or on behalf of a Commission employee, and regulations of said Secretary for the administrative control of funds shall apply to appropriations of the Commission: And provided further, That the Commission shall not be required to prescribe such regulations.
“(b) The Commission shall have power to appoint and fix the compensation of such additional personnel as may be necessary to carry out its duties, without regard to the provisions of the civil service laws and the Classification Act of 1949 [see sections 5101 et seq. and 5331 et seq. of Title 5, Government Organization and Employees].
“(c) The Commission may also procure, without regard to the civil service laws and the Classification Act of 1949 [see sections 5101 et seq. and 5331 et seq. of Title 5], temporary and intermittent services to the same extent as is authorized for the executive departments by section 15 of the Administrative Expenses Act of 1946 [see section 3109 of Title 5], but at rates not to exceed $100 per diem for individuals.
“(d) The members of the Commission specified in paragraph (1) of section 2 (a) shall provide the Commission, on a reimbursable basis, with such facilities and services under their jurisdiction and control as may be needed by the Commission to carry out its duties, to the extent that such facilities and services are requested by the Commission and are otherwise available for that purpose. To the extent of available appropriations, the Commission may obtain, by purchase, rental, donation, or otherwise, such additional property, facilities, and services as may be needed to carry out its duties. Upon the termination of the Commission all property, personal and real, and unexpended funds shall be transferred to the Department of the Interior.
“Sec. 4. [Plan for preservation, etc., contents; time] It shall be the duty of the Commission to prepare the plan referred to in the first section of this Act, and to submit the plan together with any recommendations for additional legislation, to the Congress not later than two years from the effective date of this Act. The plan for the Lowell Historic Canal District shall include considerations and recommendations, without limitation, regarding (1) the objectives to be achieved by the establishment, development, and operation of the area; (2) the types of use, both public and private, to be accommodated; (3) criteria for the design and appearance of buildings, facilities, open spaces, and other improvements; (4) a program for the staging of development; (5) the anticipated interpretive, cultural, and recreational programs and uses for the area; (6) the proposed ownership and operation of all structures, facilities, and lands; (7) areas where cooperative agreements may be anticipated; (8) estimates of costs, both public and private, of implementing the plan; and (9) procedures to be used in implementing and insuring continuing conformance to the plan.
“Sec. 5. [Termination of Commission] The Commission shall be dissolved (1) upon the termination, as determined by its members, of need for its continued existence for the implementation of the plan and the operation or coordination of the entity established by the plan, or (2) upon expiration of a two-year period commencing on the effective date of this Act, whereupon the completed plan has not been submitted to the Congress, whichever occurs first.
“Sec. 6. [Contemplated authorizations] It is contemplated that the plan to be developed may propose that the Commission may be authorized to—
“(1) acquire lands and interests therein within the Lowell Historic Canal District by purchase, lease, donation, or exchange;
“(2) hold, maintain, use, develop, or operate buildings, facilities, and any other properties;
“(3) sell, lease, or otherwise dispose of real or personal property as necessary to carry out the plan;
“(4) enter into and perform such contracts, leases, cooperative agreements, or other transactions with any agency or instrumentality of the United States, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and any governmental unit within its boundaries, or any person, firm, association, or corporation as may be necessary;
“(5) establish (through covenants, regulations, agreements, or otherwise) such restrictions, standards, and requirements as are necessary to assure development, maintenance, use, and protection of the Lowell Historic Canal District in accordance with the plan; and
“(6) borrow money from the Treasury of the United States in such amounts as may be authorized in appropriation Acts on the basis of obligations issued by the Commission in accordance with terms and conditions approved by the Secretary of the Treasury. The Secretary of the Treasury is authorized and directed to purchase any such obligations of the Commission.
“Sec. 7. [Title to property] Title to property of the Commission shall be in the name of the Commission, but it shall not be subject to any Federal, State, or municipal taxes.
“Sec. 8. [Authorization of appropriations] There are authorized to be appropriated not to exceed $150,000 for the preparation of the plan authorized by this Act.”
Proc. No. 3339. Establishment of Key Largo Coral Reef Preserve

Proc. No. 3339, Mar. 15, 1960, 25 F.R. 2352, provided:
WHEREAS there is situated seaward from the coast of Key Largo, Florida, an undersea coral reef formation which is part of the only living coral reef formation along the coast of North America; and
WHEREAS this unique coral formation and its associated marine life are of great scientific interest and value to students of the sea; and
WHEREAS this coral reef is considered to be one of the most beautiful formations of its kind in the world; and
WHEREAS the reef is being subjected to commercial exploitation and is in danger of destruction; and
WHEREAS it is in the public interest to preserve this formation of great scientific and esthetic importance for the benefit and enjoyment of the people; and
WHEREAS a portion of this reef lies inside the three-mile limit in the area relinquished to the State of Florida by the United States through the Submerged Lands Act, approved May 22, 1953 (67 Stat. 29; 43 U.S.C. 1301 et seq.), and the remainder lies on the sea bed of the outer Continental Shelf outside the seaward boundary of the State of Florida and appertains to the United States, as declared by the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, approved August 7, 1953 (67 Stat. 462; 43 U.S.C. 1331 et seq.); and
WHEREAS the United States and the State of Florida are desirous of cooperating for the purpose of preserving the scenic and scientific values of this area unimpaired for the benefit of future generations; and
WHEREAS by the terms of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act the United States has jurisdiction over the lands of the outer Continental Shelf and has the exclusive right to dispose of the natural resources of the sea bed and subsoil thereof; and
WHEREAS section 12(a) of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act [subsec. (a) ofsection 1341 of Title 43, Public Lands] authorizes the President to withdraw from disposition any of the unleased lands of the outer Continental Shelf; and
WHEREAS section 5 of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act [section 1334 of Title 43] authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to prescribe rules and regulations for the conservation of the natural resources of the outer Continental Shelf and to cooperate with the conservation agencies of adjacent States in the enforcement of conservation laws, rules, and regulations:
NOW, THEREFORE, I, DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER, President of the United States of America, acting under and by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the statutes of the United States, particularly section 12(a) of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act [subsec. (a) ofsection 1341 of Title 43], do proclaim that, subject to valid existing rights, the following-described area is designated as the Key Largo Coral Reef Preserve, and so much thereof as lies on the outer Continental Shelf is withdrawn from disposition:
That portion of the outer Continental Shelf situated seaward of a line three geographic miles from Key Largo, Monroe County, Florida, lying and being within the following described area:
Beginning at a point on the 60-foot depth curve (10-fathom line) as delineated on Coast and Geodetic Survey Chart 1249 (approximate Latitude 25°1736 N., Longitude 80°1000 W.), 200 yards southeast of Flashing White Light—Whistle Buoy “2”; thence northwesterly approximately 7,000 yards through Whistle Buoy “2” to Can Buoy “21” (approximate Latitude 25°2006 N., Longitude 80°1236 W.) southeast of Old Rhodes Key; thence southwesterly about 6,900 yards to Can Buoy “25”; thence southwesterly approximately 5,500 yards to Can Buoy “27”; thence southwesterly approximately 5,000 yards to Flashing Green Light “31BH” in Hawk Channel southeast of Point Elizabeth; thence southwesterly approximately 10,650 yards to Black Day Beacon “33” in Hawk Channel east of Point Willie; thence southwesterly approximately 9,800 yards to Flashing White Light “35” on Mosquito Bank east of Point Charles; thence southwesterly approximately 5,400 yards to Black Day Beacon “37” (approximate Latitude 25°0225 N., Longitude 80°2536 W.), southeast of Rodriguez Key; thence southeasterly approximately 7,100 yards (pass 600 yards southwest of Flashing Light “2” at Molasses Reef) to the 60-foot depth curve (10-fathom line) 800 yards due south of said light at Molasses Reef (approximate Latitude 25°0018 N., Longitude 80°2230 W.); thence northeasterly with the 60-foot depth curve and 10-fathom line (passing easterly of French Reef, Dixie Shoal, The Elbow, and Carysfort Reef) approximately 21 miles to the point of beginning.
I call upon all persons to join in the effort to protect and preserve this natural wonder for the benefit of future generations.
The Secretary of the Interior is requested to prescribe rules and regulations governing the protection and conservation of the coral and other mineral resources in this area and to cooperate with the State of Florida and its conservation agencies in the preservation of the reef.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.
DONE at the City of Washington this fifteenth day of March in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and sixty, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eighty-fourth.
[seal] Dwight D. Eisenhower.

This is a list of parts within the Code of Federal Regulations for which this US Code section provides rulemaking authority.

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36 CFR - Parks, Forests, and Public Property

36 CFR Part 62 - NATIONAL NATURAL LANDMARKS PROGRAM

36 CFR Part 65 - NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARKS PROGRAM

 

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