19 U.S. Code § 2114a - Negotiating objectives with respect to trade in services, foreign direct investment, and high technology products

(a) Trade in services
(1) In general
Principal United States negotiating objectives under section 2112 of this title shall be—
(A) to reduce or to eliminate barriers to, or other distortions of, international trade in services (particularly United States service sector trade in foreign markets), including barriers that deny national treatment and restrictions on the establishment and operation in such markets; and
(B) to develop internationally agreed rules, including dispute settlement procedures, which—
(i) are consistent with the commercial policies of the United States, and
(ii) will reduce or eliminate such barriers or distortions and help ensure open international trade in services.
(2) Domestic objectives
In pursuing the objectives described in paragraph (1), United States negotiators shall take into account legitimate United States domestic objectives including, but not limited to, the protection of legitimate health or safety, essential security, environmental, consumer or employment opportunity interests and the laws and regulations related thereto.
(b) Foreign direct investment
(1) In general
Principal United States negotiating objectives under section 2112 of this title shall be—
(A) to reduce or to eliminate artificial or trade-distorting barriers to foreign direct investment, to expand the principle of national treatment, and to reduce unreasonable barriers to establishment; and
(B) to develop internationally agreed rules, including dispute settlement procedures, which—
(i) will help ensure a free flow of foreign direct investment, and
(ii) will reduce or eliminate the trade distortive effects of certain investment related measures.
(2) Domestic objectives
In pursuing the objectives described in paragraph (1), United States negotiators shall take into account legitimate United States domestic objectives including, but not limited to, the protection of legitimate health or safety, essential security, environmental, consumer or employment opportunity interests and the laws and regulations related thereto.
(c) High technology products
Principal United States negotiating objectives shall be—
(1) to obtain and preserve the maximum openness with respect to international trade and investment in high technology products and related services;
(2) to obtain the elimination or reduction of, or compensation for, the significantly distorting effects of foreign government acts, policies, or practices identified in section 2241 of this title, with particular consideration given to the nature and extent of foreign government intervention affecting United States exports of high technology products or investments in high technology industries, including—
(A) foreign industrial policies which distort international trade or investment;
(B) measures which deny national treatment or otherwise discriminate in favor of domestic high technology industries;
(C) measures which fail to provide adequate and effective means for foreign nationals to secure, exercise, and enforce exclusive rights in intellectual property (including trademarks, patents, and copyrights);
(D) measures which impair access to domestic markets for key commodity products; and
(E) measures which facilitate or encourage anticompetitive market practices or structures;
(3) to obtain commitments that official policy of foreign countries or instrumentalities will not discourage government or private procurement of foreign high technology products and related services;
(4) to obtain the reduction or elimination of all tariffs on, and other barriers to, United States exports of high technology products and related services;
(5) to obtain commitments to foster national treatment;
(6) to obtain commitments to—
(A) foster the pursuit of joint scientific cooperation between companies, institutions or governmental entities of the United States and those of the trading partners of the United States in areas of mutual interest through such measures as financial participation and technical and personnel exchanges, and
(B) ensure that access by all participants to the results of any such cooperative efforts should not be impaired; and
(7) to provide effective minimum safeguards for the acquisition and enforcement of intellectual property rights and the property value of proprietary data.
(d) Definition of barriers and other distortions
For purposes of subsection (a) of this section, the term “barriers to, or other distortions of, international trade in services” includes, but is not limited to—
(1) barriers to establishment in foreign markets, and
(2) restrictions on the operation of enterprises in foreign markets, including—
(A) direct or indirect restrictions on the transfer of information into, or out of, the country or instrumentality concerned, and
(B) restrictions on the use of data processing facilities within or outside of such country or instrumentality.

Source

(Pub. L. 93–618, title I, § 104A, as added Pub. L. 98–573, title III, § 305(a)(1),Oct. 30, 1984, 98 Stat. 3006.)

 

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