19 U.S. Code § 3317 - Congressional intent regarding future accessions

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(a) In general
Section 3311 (a) of this title may not be construed as conferring Congressional approval of the entry into force of the Agreement for the United States with respect to countries other than Canada and Mexico.
(b) Future free trade area negotiations
(1) Findings
The Congress makes the following findings:
(A) Efforts by the United States to obtain greater market opening through multilateral negotiations have not produced agreements that fully satisfy the trade negotiating objectives of the United States.
(B) United States trade policy should provide for additional mechanisms with which to pursue greater market access for United States exports of goods and services and opportunities for export-related investment by United States persons.
(C) Among the additional mechanisms should be a system of bilateral and multilateral trade agreements that provide greater market access for United States exports and opportunities for export-related investment by United States persons.
(D) The system of trade agreements can and should be structured to be consistent with, and complementary to, existing international obligations of the United States and ongoing multilateral efforts to open markets.
(2) Report on significant market opening
No later than May 1, 1994, and May 1, 1997, the Trade Representative shall submit to the President, and to the Committee on Finance of the Senate and the Committee on Ways and Means of the House of Representatives (hereafter in this section referred to as the “appropriate Congressional committees”), a report which lists those foreign countries—
(A) that—
(i) currently provide fair and equitable market access for United States exports of goods and services and opportunities for export-related investment by United States persons, beyond what is required by existing multilateral trade agreements or obligations; or
(ii) have made significant progress in opening their markets to United States exports of goods and services and export-related investment by United States persons; and
(B) the further opening of whose markets has the greatest potential to increase United States exports of goods and services and export-related investment by United States persons, either directly or through the establishment of a beneficial precedent.
(3) Presidential determination
The President, on the basis of the report submitted by the Trade Representative under paragraph (2), shall determine with which foreign country or countries, if any, the United States should seek to negotiate a free trade area agreement or agreements.
(4) Recommendations on future free trade area negotiations
No later than July 1, 1994, and July 1, 1997, the President shall submit to the appropriate Congressional committees a written report that contains—
(A) recommendations for free trade area negotiations with each foreign country selected under paragraph (3);
(B) with respect to each country selected, the specific negotiating objectives that are necessary to meet the objectives of the United States under this section; and
(C) legislative proposals to ensure adequate consultation with the Congress and the private sector during the negotiations, advance Congressional approval of the negotiations recommended by the President, and Congressional approval of any trade agreement entered into by the President as a result of the negotiations.
(5) General negotiating objectives
The general negotiating objectives of the United States under this section are to obtain—
(A) preferential treatment for United States goods;
(B) national treatment and, where appropriate, equivalent competitive opportunity for United States services and foreign direct investment by United States persons;
(C) the elimination of barriers to trade in goods and services by United States persons through standards, testing, labeling, and certification requirements;
(D) nondiscriminatory government procurement policies and practices with respect to United States goods and services;
(E) the elimination of other barriers to market access for United States goods and services, and the elimination of barriers to foreign direct investment by United States persons;
(F) the elimination of acts, policies, and practices which deny fair and equitable market opportunities, including foreign government toleration of anticompetitive business practices by private firms or among private firms that have the effect of restricting, on a basis that is inconsistent with commercial considerations, purchasing by such firms of United States goods and services;
(G) adequate and effective protection of intellectual property rights of United States persons, and fair and equitable market access for United States persons that rely upon intellectual property protection;
(H) the elimination of foreign export and domestic subsidies that distort international trade in United States goods and services or cause material injury to United States industries;
(I) the elimination of all export taxes;
(J) the elimination of acts, policies, and practices which constitute export targeting; and
(K) monitoring and effective dispute settlement mechanisms to facilitate compliance with the matters described in subparagraphs (A) through (J).

Source

(Pub. L. 103–182, title I, § 108,Dec. 8, 1993, 107 Stat. 2066.)

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19 USCDescription of ChangeSession YearPublic LawStatutes at Large

 

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