22 U.S. Code § 287 - Representation in Organization

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(a) Appointment of representative; rank, status, and tenure; duties
The President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall appoint a representative of the United States to the United Nations who shall have the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary and shall hold office at the pleasure of the President. Such representative shall represent the United States in the Security Council of the United Nations and may serve ex officio as representative of the United States in any organ, commission, or other body of the United Nations other than specialized agencies of the United Nations, and shall perform such other functions in connection with the participation of the United States in the United Nations as the President may, from time to time, direct.
(b) Appointment of additional representatives; rank, status, and tenure; duties; reappointment unnecessary
The President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall appoint additional persons with appropriate titles, rank, and status to represent the United States in the principal organs of the United Nations and in such organs, commissions, or other bodies as may be created by the United Nations with respect to nuclear energy or disarmament (control and limitation of armament). Such persons shall serve at the pleasure of the President and subject to the direction of the Representative of the United States to the United Nations. They shall, at the direction of the Representative of the United States to the United Nations, represent the United States in any organ, commission, or other body of the United Nations, including the Security Council, the Economic and Social Council, and the Trusteeship Council, and perform such other functions as the Representative of the United States is authorized to perform in connection with the participation of the United States in the United Nations. Any Deputy Representative or any other officer holding office at the time the provisions of this Act, as amended, become effective shall not be required to be reappointed by reason of the enactment of this Act, as amended.
(c) Appointment of special and alternate representatives; number; senior representative; duties
The President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall designate from time to time to attend a specified session or specified sessions of the General Assembly of the United Nations not to exceed five representatives of the United States and such number of alternates as he may determine consistent with the rules of procedure of the General Assembly. One of the representatives shall be designated as the senior representative.
(d) Additional appointees; conditions governing certain appointments; designation of certain State Department officers to sit on Security Council
The President may also appoint from time to time such other persons as he may deem necessary to represent the United States in organs and agencies of the United Nations. The President may, without the advice and consent of the Senate, designate any officer of the United States to act without additional compensation as the representative of the United States in either the Economic and Social Council or the Trusteeship Council
(1) at any specified session thereof where the position is vacant or in the absence or disability of the regular representative or
(2) in connection with a specified subject matter at any specified session of either such Council in lieu of the regular representative. The President may designate any officer of the Department of State, whose appointment is subject to confirmation by the Senate, to act, without additional compensation, for temporary periods as the representative of the United States in the Security Council of the United Nations in the absence or disability of the representatives provided for under subsections (a) and (b) of this section or in lieu of such representatives in connection with a specified subject matter.
(e) Appointment of representative to European office of United Nations; rank, status, and tenure; duties
The President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall appoint a representative of the United States to the European office of the United Nations, with appropriate rank and status who shall serve at the pleasure of the President and subject to the direction of the Secretary of State. Such person shall, at the direction of the Secretary of State, represent the United States at the European office of the United Nations, and perform such other functions there in connection with the participation of the United States in international organizations as the Secretary of State may, from time to time, direct.
(f) Representation by President or Secretary of State
Nothing contained in this section shall preclude the President or the Secretary of State, at the direction of the President, from representing the United States at any meeting or session of any organ or agency of the United Nations.
(g) Compensation
All persons appointed in pursuance of authority contained in this section shall receive compensation at rates determined by the President upon the basis of duties to be performed but not in excess of rates authorized by sections 3961, 3962, and 3963 of this title for chiefs of mission, members of the Senior Foreign Service, and Foreign Service officers occupying positions of equivalent importance, except that no member of the Senate or House of Representatives or officer of the United States who is designated under subsections (c) and (d) of this section as a representative of the United States or as an alternate to attend any specified session or specified sessions of the General Assembly shall be entitled to receive such compensation.
(h) Appointment of representative to Vienna office of United Nations; rank, status, and tenure; duties
The President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall appoint a representative of the United States to the Vienna office of the United Nations with appropriate rank and status, who shall serve at the pleasure of the President and subject to the direction of the Secretary of State. Such individual shall, at the direction of the Secretary of State, represent the United States at the Vienna office of the United Nations and perform such other functions there in connection with the participation of the United States in international organizations as the Secretary of State from time to time may direct. The representative of the United States to the Vienna office of the United Nations shall also serve as representative of the United States to the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Source

(Dec. 20, 1945, ch. 583, § 2,59 Stat. 619; Oct. 10, 1949, ch. 660, §§ 1, 2,63 Stat. 734, 735; Pub. L. 89–206, §§ 1, 2,Sept. 28, 1965, 79 Stat. 841, 842; Pub. L. 96–465, title II, § 2206(a)(2)(A),Oct. 17, 1980, 94 Stat. 2160; Pub. L. 97–241, title I, § 118,Aug. 24, 1982, 96 Stat. 279; Pub. L. 106–113, div. B, § 1000(a)(7) [div. A, title VII, § 708(a)], Nov. 29, 1999, 113 Stat. 1536, 1501A–461.)
References in Text

This Act, as amended, referred to in subsec. (b), is Pub. L. 89–206, Sept. 28, 1965, 79 Stat. 841, which amended this section. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Tables.
Amendments

1999—Subsec. (h). Pub. L. 106–113inserted at end “The representative of the United States to the Vienna office of the United Nations shall also serve as representative of the United States to the International Atomic Energy Agency.”
1982—Subsec. (h). Pub. L. 97–241added subsec. (h).
1980—Subsec. (g). Pub. L. 96–465substituted “sections 3961, 3962, and 3963 of this title for chiefs of mission, members of the Senior Foreign Service,” for “sections 866 and 867 of this title for chiefs of mission”.
1965—Subsec. (a). Pub. L. 89–206, § 1(a), struck out provisions which related to the appointment, rank and status, tenure and duties of a deputy representative of the United States to the United Nations.
Subsec. (b). Pub. L. 89–206, § 1(a), substituted provisions that the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall appoint additional persons with appropriate titles, rank, and status to represent the United States in the principal organs of the United Nations and in such organs, commissions, or other bodies as may be created by the United Nations with respect to nuclear energy or disarmament, that they shall serve at the pleasure of the President and subject to the direction of the Representative of the United States to the United Nations, that they shall, at the direction of the Representative of the United States to the United Nations, represent the United States in any organ, commission, or other body of the United Nations, including the Security Council, the Economic and Social Council, and the Trusteeship Council, and perform such other functions as the Representative of the United States is authorized to perform in connection with the participation of the United States in the United Nations, and that any Deputy Representative or any other officer holding office at the time the provisions of this Act, as amended, become effective shall not be required to be reappointed by reason of the enactment of this Act, as amended, for provisions which authorized the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to appoint an additional deputy representative of the United States to the Security Council who shall hold office at the pleasure of the President, and which required the deputy representative to represent the United States in the Security Council of the United Nations in the event of the absence or disability of both the representative and the deputy representative of the United States to the United Nations.
Subsec. (d). Pub. L. 89–206, § 1(b), struck out provisions which required the representative of the United States in the Economic and Social Council and in the Trusteeship Council of the United Nations to be appointed only by and with the advice and consent of the Senate and which required the advice and consent of the Senate for the appointment by the President of the representative of the United States in any commission that may be formed by the United Nations with respect to atomic energy or in any other commission of the United Nations to which the United States is entitled to appoint a representative.
Subsecs. (e) to (g). Pub. L. 89–206, § 2, added subsec. (e) and redesignated former subsecs. (e) and (f) as (f) and (g), respectively.
1949—Subsec. (a). Act Oct. 10, 1949, § 1, created new post of deputy representative, and allowed the principal and deputy representatives to serve ex officio on any organ, commission, or body, other than specialized agencies, of the United Nations.
Subsec. (b). Act Oct. 10, 1949, § 1, amended subsec. (b) generally, to provide for appointment of an additional deputy representative.
Subsec. (c). Act Oct. 10, 1949, § 1, amended subsec. (c) generally, to provide for appointment of special and alternate representatives.
Subsec. (d). Act Oct. 10, 1949, § 1, allowed the designation by the President of any State Department officer, whose appointment is subject to confirmation by the Senate, to sit on the Security Council in certain instances.
Subsec. (f). Act Oct. 10, 1949, § 2, added subsec. (f).
Effective Date of 1999 Amendment

Pub. L. 106–113, div. B, § 1000(a)(7) [div. A, title VII, § 708(c)], Nov. 29, 1999, 113 Stat. 1536, 1501A–462, provided that: “The amendments made by subsections (a) and (b) [amending this section and section 2021 of this title] shall apply to individuals appointed on or after the date of enactment of this Act [Nov. 29, 1999].”
Effective Date of 1980 Amendment

Amendment by Pub. L. 96–465effective Feb. 15, 1981, except as otherwise provided, see section 2403 ofPub. L. 96–465, set out as an Effective Date note under section 3901 of this title.
Short Title

Act Dec. 20, 1945, ch. 583, § 1,59 Stat. 619, provided that: “This Act [enacting this subchapter] may be cited as the ‘United Nations Participation Act of 1945’.”
United States Membership on the United Nations Commission on Human Rights and International Narcotics Control Board

Pub. L. 107–228, div. A, title IV, § 408,Sept. 30, 2002, 116 Stat. 1391, provided that: “The United States, in connection with its voice and vote in the United Nations General Assembly and the United Nations Economic and Social Council, shall make every reasonable effort—
“(1) to secure a seat for the United States on the United Nations Commission on Human Rights;
“(2) to secure a seat for a United States national on the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board; and
“(3) to prevent membership on the Human Rights Commission by any member nation the government of which, in the judgment of the Secretary, based on the Department’s Annual Country Reports on Human Rights and the Annual Report on International Report on Religious Freedom, consistently violates internationally recognized human rights or has engaged in or tolerated particularly severe violations of religious freedom in that country.”
[For definitions of “Secretary” and “Department” as used in section 408 ofPub. L. 107–228, set out above, see section 3 ofPub. L. 107–228, set out as a note under section 2651 of this title.]
United Nations Policy on Israel and the Palestinians

Pub. L. 106–113, div. B, § 1000(a)(7) [div. A, title VII, § 721], Nov. 29, 1999, 113 Stat. 1536, 1501A–462, provided that:
“(a) Congressional Statement.—It shall be the policy of the United States to promote an end to the persistent inequity experienced by Israel in the United Nations whereby Israel is the only longstanding member of the organization to be denied acceptance into any of the United Nations regional blocs.
“(b) Policy on Abolition of Certain United Nations Groups.—It shall be the policy of the United States to seek the abolition of certain United Nations groups the existence of which is inimical to the ongoing Middle East peace process, those groups being the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and other Arabs of the Occupied Territories; the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People; the Division for the Palestinian Rights; and the Division on Public Information on the Question of Palestine.
“(c) Annual Reports.—On January 15 of each year, the Secretary of State shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees [Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate] (in classified or unclassified form as appropriate) on—
“(1) actions taken by representatives of the United States to encourage the nations of the Western Europe and Others Group (WEOG) to accept Israel into their regional bloc;
“(2) other measures being undertaken, and which will be undertaken, to ensure and promote Israel’s full and equal participation in the United Nations; and
“(3) steps taken by the United States under subsection (b) to secure abolition by the United Nations of groups described in that subsection.
“(d) Annual Consultation.—At the time of the submission of each annual report under subsection (c), the Secretary of State shall consult with the appropriate congressional committees on specific responses received by the Secretary of State from each of the nations of the Western Europe and Others Group (WEOG) on their position concerning Israel’s acceptance into their organization.”
United States Commission on Improving the Effectiveness of the United Nations

Pub. L. 100–204, title VII, part B, Dec. 22, 1987, 101 Stat. 1391, as amended by Pub. L. 101–246, title IV, § 409,Feb. 16, 1990, 104 Stat. 68, provided for establishment, membership, etc., of United States Commission on Improving the Effectiveness of the United Nations to examine the United Nations system as a whole and identify and evaluate its strengths and weaknesses and to transmit to President and Congress, not later than 18 months after the date on which all members of the Commission have been appointed, a report containing a detailed statement of the findings, conclusions, and recommendations of the Commission, which report was dated Sept. 10, 1993, and the Commission terminated Sept. 30, 1993.
Soviet Mission at the United Nations

Pub. L. 99–569, title VII, § 702,Oct. 27, 1986, 100 Stat. 3204, related to policy of Congress of limiting number of Soviet nationals serving as members of Soviet mission at the United Nations to number not to substantially exceed number of United States nationals serving as members of United States mission, required Secretary of State to report numbers of Soviet nationals so serving, and provided that spouses and dependents were not to be included in such numbers, prior to repeal by Pub. L. 103–199, title V, § 501(d),Dec. 17, 1993, 107 Stat. 2325.
United States Participation in the United Nations if Israel is Illegally Expelled

Pub. L. 98–164, title I, § 115,Nov. 22, 1983, 97 Stat. 1021, as amended by Pub. L. 99–93, title I, § 142,Aug. 16, 1985, 99 Stat. 424; Pub. L. 100–204, title VII, § 704,Dec. 22, 1987, 101 Stat. 1389, provided that:
“(a) The Congress finds that—
“(1) the United Nations was founded on the principle of universality;
“(2) the United Nations Charter stipulates that members may be suspended by the General Assembly only ‘upon the recommendation of the Security Council’; and
“(3) any move by the General Assembly that would illegally deny Israel its credentials in the Assembly would be a direct violation of these provisions of the Charter.
“(b) If Israel is illegally expelled, suspended, denied its credentials, or in any other manner denied its right to participate in any principal or subsidiary organ or in any specialized, technical, or other agency of the United Nations, the United States shall suspend its participation in any such organ or agency until the illegal action is reversed. The United States shall reduce its annual assessed contribution to the United Nations or such specialized agency by 8.34 percent for each month in which United States participation is suspended pursuant to this section. Nothing in this section may be construed to diminish or to affect United States participation in the United Nations Security Council or the Safeguards Program of the International Atomic Energy Agency.”
International Year of the Child

Pub. L. 95–561, title XV, §§ 1501–1507,Nov. 1, 1978, 92 Stat. 2373–2375, described the purpose of the International Year of the Child (designated as 1979 by the United Nations General Assembly) as promotion of lasting improvements in the well-being of children, provided for the establishment of a National Commission on the International Year of the Child, and for the Commission’s membership, functions, coordination and administration, and waiver of certain provisions of law relating to advertising, competitive bidding, and printing, authorized appropriations, and terminated the life of the Commission thirty days after the submission of its final report, which was to be submitted not later than Mar. 31, 1980, but which life was in no case to be extended beyond Apr. 30, 1980.
Pub. L. 97–35, title V, § 511(b)(1),Aug. 13, 1981, 95 Stat. 443, provided that: “No funds are authorized to be appropriated to carry out part A of title XV of the Education Amendments of 1978 [sections 1501 to 1507 ofPub. L. 95–561, see note above] for fiscal year 1982, 1983, or 1984.”
United Nations Environment Program Participation

Pub. L. 93–188, Dec. 15, 1973, 87 Stat. 713, provided:
“[Sec. 1. Short Title] That this Act [enacting this note] may be cited as the ‘United Nations Environment Program Participation Act of 1973’.
“Sec. 2. [Congressional Declaration of Policy] It is the policy of the United States to participate in coordinated international efforts to solve environmental problems of global and international concern, and in order to assist the implementation of this policy, to contribute funds to the United Nations Environmental Fund for the support of international measures to protect and improve the environment.
“Sec. 3. [Authorization of Appropriations] There is authorized to be appropriated $40,000,000 for contributions to the United Nations Environment Fund, which amount is authorized to remain available until expended, and which may be used upon such terms and conditions as the President may specify: Provided, That not more than $10,000,000 may be appropriated for use in fiscal year 1974.”
United States Grant for Expansion and Improvement of United Nations Headquarters

Pub. L. 91–622, Dec. 31, 1970, 84 Stat. 1867, provided: “That there is hereby authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of State out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, a sum not to exceed $20,000,000, to remain available until expended, for a grant to be made at the discretion of the Secretary of State, to the United Nations to defray a portion of the cost of the expansion and improvement of its headquarters in the city of New York on such terms and conditions as the Secretary of State may determine. Such grant shall not be considered a contribution to the United Nations for purpose of any other applicable law limiting contributions.”
United States Loan for Construction of Permanent Headquarters in New York City

Act Aug. 11, 1948, ch. 834, 62 Stat. 1286, authorized the President to loan to the United Nations $65,000,000 to construct a permanent headquarters in New York City, provided for the repayment of the loan without interest in installments beginning July 1, 1951, and continuing until July 1, 1982, and authorized the Reconstruction Finance Corporation to advance to the United Nations up to $25,000,000 until such time as the $65,000,000 is appropriated by Congress.
Establishment of Permanent Headquarters in New York; Agreement Between United Nations and United States

Joint Res. Aug. 4, 1947, ch. 482, 61 Stat. 756, provided that:
“Whereas the Charter of the United Nations was signed on behalf of the United States on June 26, 1945, and was ratified on August 8, 1945, by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, and the instrument of ratification of the said Charter was deposited on August 8, 1945; and
“Whereas the said Charter of the United Nations came into force with respect to the United States on October 24, 1945; and
“Whereas article 104 of the Charter provides that ‘The Organization shall enjoy in the territory of each of its Members such legal capacity as may be necessary for the exercise of its functions and the fulfillment of its purposes’; and
“Whereas article 105 of the Charter provides that:
“1. The Organization shall enjoy in the territory of each of its Members such privileges and immunities as are necessary for the fulfillment of its purposes.
“2. Representatives of the Members of the United Nations and officials of the Organization shall similarly enjoy such privileges and immunities as are necessary for the independent exercise of their functions in connection with the Organization.
“3. The General Assembly may make recommendations with a view to determining the details of the application of paragraphs 1 and 2 of this article or may propose conventions to the Members of the United Nations for this purpose; and
“Whereas article 28 and other articles of the Charter of the United Nations contemplate the establishment of a seat for the permanent headquarters of the Organization; and
“Whereas the interim arrangements concluded on June 26, 1945, by the governments represented at the United Nations Conference on International Organization instructed the Preparatory Commission established in pursuance of the arrangements to ‘make studies and prepare recommendations concerning the location of the permanent headquarters of the Organization’; and
“Whereas during the labors of the said Preparatory Commission, the Congress of the United States in H. Con. Res. 75, passed unanimously by the House of Representatives December 10, 1945, and agreed to unanimously by the Senate December 11, 1945, invited the United Nations ‘to locate the seat of the United Nations Organization within the United States’; and
“Whereas the General Assembly on December 14, 1946, resolved ‘that the permanent headquarters of the United Nations shall be established in New York City in the area bounded by First Avenue, East Forty-eighth Street, the East River, and East Forty-second Street’; and
“Whereas the General Assembly resolved on December 14, 1946, ‘That the Secretary-General be authorized to negotiate and conclude with the appropriate authorities of the United States of America an agreement concerning the arrangements required as a result of the establishment of the permanent headquarters of the United Nations in the city of New York’ and to be guided in these negotiations by the provisions of a preliminary draft agreement which had been negotiated by the Secretary-General and the Secretary of State of the United States; and
“Whereas the General Assembly resolved on December 14, 1946, that pending the coming into force of the agreement referred to above ‘the Secretary-General be authorized to negotiate and conclude arrangements with the appropriate authorities of the United States of America to determine on a provisional basis the privileges, immunities, and facilities needed in connection with the temporary headquarters of the United Nations.’; and
“Whereas the Secretary of State of the United States, after consultation with the appropriate authorities of the State and city of New York, signed at Lake Success, New York, on June 26, 1947, on behalf of the United States an agreement with the United Nations regarding the headquarters of the United Nations, which agreement is incorporated herein; and
“Whereas the aforesaid agreement provides that it shall be brought into effect by an exchange of notes between the United States and the Secretary-General of the United Nations: Therefore be it
“Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the President is hereby authorized to bring into effect on the part of the United States the agreement between the United States of America and the United Nations regarding the headquarters of the United Nations, signed at Lake Success, New York, on June 26, 1947 (hereinafter referred to as the ‘agreement’), with such changes therein not contrary to the general tenor thereof and not imposing any additional obligations on the United States as the President may deem necessary and appropriate, and at his discretion, after consultation with the appropriate State and local authorities, to enter into such supplemental agreements with the United Nations as may be necessary to fulfill the purposes of the said agreement: Provided, That any supplemental agreement entered into pursuant to section 5 of the agreement incorporated herein shall be submitted to the Congress for approval. The agreement follows:
“AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE UNITED NATIONS AND THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA REGARDING THE HEADQUARTERS OF THE UNITED NATIONS
The United Nations and the United States of America:

Desiring to conclude an agreement for the purpose of carrying out the Resolution adopted by the General Assembly on 14 December 1946 to establish the seat of the United Nations in The City of New York and to regulate questions arising as a result thereof;
Have appointed as their representatives for this purpose:
The United Nations:
Trygve Lie,
and   Secretary-General,
The United States of America:
George C. Marshall,
Secretary of State,
Who have agreed as follows:
“Article I—Definitions

section 1

In this agreement:
(a) The expression ‘headquarters district’ means (1) the area defined as such in Annex 1, (2) any other lands or buildings which from time to time may be included therein by supplemental agreement with the appropriate American authorities;
(b) the expression ‘appropriate American authorities’ means such federal, state, or local authorities in the United States as may be appropriate in the context and in accordance with the laws and customs of the United States, including the laws and customs of the state and local government involved;
(c) the expression ‘General Convention’ means the Convention on the Privileges and Immunities of the United Nations approved by the General Assembly of the United Nations 13 February 1946, as acceded to by the United States;
(d) the expression ‘United Nations’ means the international organization established by the Charter of the United Nations, hereinafter referred to as the ‘Charter’:
(e) the expression ‘Secretary-General’ means the Secretary-General of the United Nations.
“Article II—The Headquarters District

section 2

The seat of the United Nations shall be the headquarters district.
section 3

The appropriate American authorities shall take whatever action may be necessary to assure that the United Nations shall not be dispossessed of its property in the headquarters district, except as provided in Section 22 in the event that the United Nations ceases to use the same; provided that the United Nations shall reimburse the appropriate American authorities for any costs incurred, after consultation with the United Nations, in liquidating by eminent domain proceedings or otherwise any adverse claims.
section 4

(a) The United Nations may establish and operate in the headquarters district:
(1) its own short-wave sending and receiving radio broadcasting facilities (including emergency link equipment) which may be used on the same frequencies (within the tolerances prescribed for the broadcasting service by applicable United States regulations) for radiotelegraph, radioteletype, radiotelephone, radiotelephoto, and similar services;
(2) one point-to-point circuit between the headquarters district and the office of the United Nations in Geneva (using single sideband equipment) to be used exclusively for the exchange of broadcasting programs and interoffice communications;
(3) low power micro-wave, low or medium frequency facilities for communication within headquarters buildings only, or such other buildings as may temporarily be used by the United Nations;
(4) facilities for point-to-point communication to the same extent and subject to the same conditions as permitted under applicable rules and regulations for amateur operation in the United States, except that such rules and regulations shall not be applied in a manner inconsistent with the inviolability of the headquarters district provided by Section 9 (a);
(5) such other radio facilities as may be specified by supplemental agreement between the United Nations and the appropriate American authorities.
(b) The United Nations shall make arrangements for the operation of the services referred to in this section with the International Telecommunication Union, the appropriate agencies of the Government of the United States and the appropriate agencies of other affected governments with regard to all frequencies and similar matters.
(c) The facilities provided for in this section may, to the extent necessary for efficient operation, be established and operated outside the headquarters district. The appropriate American authorities will, on request of the United Nations, make arrangements, on such terms and in such manner as may be agreed upon by supplemental agreement, for the acquisition or use by the United Nations of appropriate premises for such purposes and the inclusion of such premises in the headquarters district.
section 5

In the event that the United Nations should find it necessary and desirable to establish and operate an aerodrome, the conditions for the location, use and operation of such an aerodrome and the conditions under which there shall be entry into and exit therefrom shall be the subject of a supplemental agreement.
section 6

In the event that the United Nations should propose to organize its own postal service, the conditions under which such service shall be set up shall be the subject of a supplemental agreement.
“Article III—Law and Authority in the Headquarters District

section 7

(a) The headquarters district shall be under the control and authority of the United Nations as provided in this agreement.
(b) Except as otherwise provided in this agreement or in the General Convention, the federal, state and local law of the United States shall apply within the headquarters district.
(c) Except as otherwise provided in this agreement or in the General Convention, the federal, state and local courts of the United States shall have jurisdiction over acts done and transactions taking place in the headquarters district as provided in applicable federal, state and local laws.
(d) The federal, state and local courts of the United States, when dealing with cases arising out of or relating to acts done or transactions taking place in the headquarters district, shall take into account the regulations enacted by the United Nations under Section 8.
section 8

The United Nations shall have the power to make regulations, operative within the headquarters district for the purpose of establishing therein conditions in all respects necessary for the full execution of its functions. No federal, state or local law or regulation of the United States which is inconsistent with a regulation of the United Nations authorized by this section shall, to the extent of such inconsistency, be applicable within the headquarters district. Any dispute, between the United Nations and the United States, as to whether a regulation of the United Nations is authorized by this section or as to whether a federal, state or local law or regulation is inconsistent with any regulation of the United Nations authorized by this section, shall be promptly settled as provided in Section 21. Pending such settlement, the regulation of the United Nations shall apply, and the federal, state or local law or regulation shall be inapplicable in the headquarters district to the extent that the United Nations claims it to be inconsistent with the regulation of the United Nations. This section shall not prevent the reasonable application of fire protection regulations of the appropriate American authorities.
section 9

(a) The headquarters district shall be inviolable. Federal, state or local officers or officials of the United States, whether administrative, judicial, military or police, shall not enter the headquarters district to perform any official duties therein except with the consent of and under conditions agreed to by the Secretary-General. The service of legal process, including the seizure of private property, may take place within the headquarters district only with the consent of and under conditions approved by the Secretary-General.
(b) Without prejudice to the provisions of the General Convention or Article IV of this agreement, the United Nations shall prevent the headquarters district from becoming a refuge either for persons who are avoiding arrest under the federal, state, or local law of the United States or are required by the Government of the United States for extradition to another country, or for persons who are endeavoring to avoid service of legal process.
section 10

The United Nations may expel or exclude persons from the headquarters district for violation of its regulations adopted under Section 8 or for other cause. Persons who violate such regulations shall be subject to other penalties or to detention under arrest only in accordance with the provisions of such laws or regulations as may be adopted by the appropriate American authorities.
“Article IV—Communications and Transit

section 11

The federal, state or local authorities of the United States shall not impose any impediments to transit to or from the headquarters district of (1) representatives of Members or officials of the United Nations, or of specialized agencies as defined in Article 57, paragraph 2, of the Charter, or the families of such representatives or officials, (2) experts performing missions for the United Nations or for such specialized agencies, (3) representatives of the press, or of radio, film or other information agencies, who have been accredited by the United Nations (or by such a specialized agency) in its discretion after consultation with the United States, (4) representatives of nongovernmental organizations recognized by the United Nations for the purpose of consultation under Article 71 of the Charter, or (5) other persons invited to the headquarters district by the United Nations or by such specialized agency on official business. The appropriate American authorities shall afford any necessary protection to such persons while in transit to or from the headquarters district. This section does not apply to general interruptions of transportation which are to be dealt with as provided in Section 17, and does not impair the effectiveness of generally applicable laws and regulations as to the operation of means of transportation.
section 12

The provisions of Section 11 shall be applicable irrespective of the relations existing between the Governments of the persons referred to in that section and the Government of the United States.
section 13

(a) Laws and regulations in force in the United States regarding the entry of aliens shall not be applied in such manner as to interfere with the privileges referred to in Section 11. When visas are required for persons referred to in that Section, they shall be granted without charge and as promptly as possible.
(b) Laws and regulations in force in the United States regarding the residence of aliens shall not be applied in such manner as to interfere with the privileges referred to in Section 11 and, specifically, shall not be applied in such manner as to require any such person to leave the United States on account of any activities performed by him in his official capacity. In case of abuse of such privileges of residence by any such person in activities in the United States outside his official capacity, it is understood that the privileges referred to in Section 11 shall not be construed to grant him exemption from the laws and regulations of the United States regarding the continued residence of aliens, provided that:
(1) No proceedings shall be instituted under such laws or regulations to require any such person to leave the United States except with the prior approval of the Secretary of State of the United States. Such approval shall be given only after consultation with the appropriate Member in the case of a representative of a Member (or a member of his family) or with the Secretary-General or the principal executive officer of the appropriate specialized agency in the case of any other person referred to in Section 11;
(2) A representative of the Member concerned, the Secretary-General, or the principal executive officer of the appropriate specialized agency, as the case may be, shall have the right to appear in any such proceedings on behalf of the person against whom they are instituted;
(3) Persons who are entitled to diplomatic privileges and immunities under Section 15 or under the General Convention shall not be required to leave the United States otherwise than in accordance with the customary procedure applicable to diplomatic envoys accredited to the United States.
(c) This section does not prevent the requirement of reasonable evidence to establish that persons claiming the rights granted by Section 11 come within the classes described in that section, or the reasonable application of quarantine and health regulations.
(d) Except as provided above in this section and in the General Convention, the United States retains full control and authority over the entry of persons or property into the territory of the United States and the conditions under which persons may remain or reside there.
(e) The Secretary-General shall, at the request of the appropriate American authorities, enter into discussions with such authorities, with a view to making arrangements for registering the arrival and departure of persons who have been granted visas valid only for transit to and from the headquarters district and sojourn therein and in its immediate vicinity.
(f) The United Nations shall, subject to the foregoing provisions of this section, have the exclusive right to authorize or prohibit entry of persons and property into the headquarters district and to prescribe the conditions under which persons may remain or reside there.
section 14

The Secretary-General and the appropriate American authorities shall, at the request of either of them, consult as to methods of facilitating entrance into the United States, and the use of available means of transportation, by persons coming from abroad who wish to visit the headquarters district and do not enjoy the rights referred to in this Article.
“Article V—Resident Representatives to the United Nations

section 15

(1) Every person designated by a Member as the principal resident representative to the United Nations of such Member or as a resident representative with the rank of ambassador or minister plenipotentiary,
(2) such resident members of their staffs as may be agreed upon between the Secretary-General, the Government of the United States and the Government of the Member concerned,
(3) every person designated by a Member of a specialized agency, as defined in Article 57, paragraph 2, of the Charter, as its principal resident representative, with the rank of ambassador or minister plenipotentiary, at the headquarters of such agency in the United States, and
(4) such other principal resident representatives of members to a specialized agency and such resident members of the staffs of representatives to a specialized agency as may be agreed upon between the principal executive officer of the specialized agency, the Government of the United States and the Government of the Member concerned, shall, whether residing inside or outside the headquarters district, be entitled in the territory of the United States to the same privileges and immunities, subject to corresponding conditions and obligations, as it accords to diplomatic envoys accredited to it. In the case of Members whose governments are not recognized by the United States, such privileges and immunities need be extended to such representatives, or persons on the staffs of such representatives, only within the headquarters district, at their residences and offices outside the district, in transit between the district and such residences and offices, and in transit on official business to or from foreign countries.
“Article VI—Police Protection of the Headquarters District

section 16

(a) The appropriate American authorities shall exercise due diligence to ensure that the tranquility of the headquarters district is not disturbed by the unauthorized entry of groups of persons from outside or by disturbances in its immediate vicinity and shall cause to be provided on the boundaries of the headquarters district such police protection as is required for these purposes.
(b) If so requested by the Secretary-General, the appropriate American authorities shall provide a sufficient number of police for the preservation of law and order in the headquarters district, and for the removal therefrom of persons as requested under the authority of the United Nations. The United Nations shall, if requested, enter into arrangements with the appropriate American authorities to reimburse them for the reasonable cost of such services.
“Article VII—Public Services and Protection of the Headquarters District

section 17

(a) The appropriate American authorities will exercise to the extent requested by the Secretary-General the powers which they possess with respect to the supplying of public services to ensure that the headquarters district shall be supplied on equitable terms with the necessary public services, including electricity, water, gas, post, telephone, telegraph, transportation, drainage, collection of refuse, fire protection, snow removal, et cetera. In case of any interruption or threatened interruption of any such services, the appropriate American authorities will consider the needs of the United Nations as being of equal importance with the similar needs of essential agencies of the Government of the United States, and will take steps accordingly, to ensure that the work of the United Nations is not prejudiced.
(b) Special provisions with reference to maintenance of utilities and underground construction are contained in Annex 2.
section 18

The appropriate American authorities shall take all reasonable steps to ensure that the amenities of the headquarters district are not prejudiced and the purposes for which the district is required are not obstructed by any use made of the land in the vicinity of the district. The United Nations shall on its part take all reasonable steps to ensure that the amenities of the land in the vicinity of the headquarters district are not prejudiced by any use made of the land in the headquarters district by the United Nations.
section 19

It is agreed that no form of racial or religious discrimination shall be permitted within the headquarters district.
“Article VIII—Matters Relating to the Operation of This Agreement

section 20

The Secretary-General and the appropriate American authorities shall settle by agreement the channels through which they will communicate regarding the application of the provisions of this agreement and other questions affecting the headquarters district, and may enter into such supplemental agreements as may be necessary to fulfill the purposes of this agreement. In making supplemental agreements with the Secretary-General, the United States shall consult with the appropriate state and local authorities. If the Secretary-General so requests, the Secretary of State of the United States shall appoint a special representative for the purpose of liaison with the Secretary-General.
section 21

(a) Any dispute between the United Nations and the United States concerning the interpretation or application of this agreement or of any supplemental agreement, which is not settled by negotiation or other agreed mode of settlement, shall be referred for final decision to a tribunal of three arbitrators, one to be named by the Secretary-General, one to be named by the Secretary of State of the United States, and the third to be chosen by the two, or, if they should fail to agree upon a third, then by the President of the International Court of Justice.
(b) The Secretary-General or the United States may ask the General Assembly to request of the International Court of Justice an advisory opinion on any legal question arising in the course of such proceedings. Pending the receipt of the opinion of the Court, an interim decision of the arbitral tribunal shall be observed on both parties. Thereafter, the arbitral tribunal shall render a final decision, having regard to the opinion of the Court.
“Article IX—Miscellaneous Provisions

section 22

(a) The United Nations shall not dispose of all or any part of the land owned by it in the headquarters district without the consent of the United States. If the United States is unwilling to consent to a disposition which the United Nations wishes to make of all or any part of such land, the United States shall buy the same from the United Nations at a price to be determined as provided in paragraph (d) of this section.
(b) If the seat of the United Nations is removed from the headquarters district, all right, title and interest of the United Nations in and to real property in the headquarters district or any part of it shall, on request of either the United Nations or the United States, be assigned and conveyed to the United States. In the absence of such request, the same shall be assigned and conveyed to the subdivision of a state in which it is located or, if such subdivision shall not desire it, then to the state in which it is located. If none of the foregoing desires the same, it may be disposed of as provided in paragraph (a) of this section.
(c) If the United Nations disposes of all or any part of the headquarters district, the provisions of other sections of this agreement which apply to the headquarters district shall immediately cease to apply to the land and buildings so disposed of.
(d) The price to be paid for any conveyance under this section shall, in default of agreement, be the then fair value of the land, buildings and installations, to be determined under the procedure provided in Section 21.
section 23

The seat of the United Nations shall not be removed from the headquarters district unless the United Nations should so decide.
section 24

This agreement shall cease to be in force if the seat of the United Nations is removed from the territory of the United States, except for such provisions as may be applicable in connection with the orderly termination of the operations of the United Nations at its seat in the United States and the disposition of its property therein.
section 25

Wherever this agreement imposes obligations on the appropriate American authorities, the Government of the United States shall have the ultimate responsibility for the fulfillment of such obligations by the appropriate American authorities.
section 26

The provisions of this agreement shall be complementary to the provisions of the General Convention. In so far as any provision of this agreement and any provisions of the General Convention relate to the same subject matter, the two provisions shall, wherever possible, be treated as complementary, so that both provisions shall be applicable and neither shall narrow the effect of the other; but in any case of absolute conflict, the provisions of this agreement shall prevail.
section 27

This agreement shall be construed in the light of its primary purpose to enable the United Nations at its headquarters in the United States, fully and efficiently to discharge its responsibilities and fulfill its purposes.
section 28

This agreement shall be brought into effect by an exchange of notes between the Secretary-General, duly authorized pursuant to a resolution of the General Assembly of the United Nations, and the appropriate executive officer of the United States, duly authorized pursuant to appropriate action of the Congress.
In witness whereof the respective representatives have signed this Agreement and have affixed their seals hereto.
Done in duplicate, in the English and French languages, both authentic, at Lake Success the twenty-sixth day of June 1947.
For the Government of the United States of America:
G. C. Marshall,
Secretary of State
For the United Nations:
Trygve Lie,
Secretary-General
“Annex 1

The area referred to in Section 1 (a)(1) consists of (a) the premises bounded on the East by the westerly side of Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive, on the West by the easterly side of First Avenue, on the North by the southerly side of East Forty-eighth Street, and on the South by the northerly side of East Forty-second Street, all as proposed to be widened, in the Borough of Manhattan, City and State of New York, and (b) an easement over Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive, above a lower limiting plane to be fixed for the construction and maintenance of an esplanade, together with the structures thereon and foundations and columns to support the same in locations below such limiting plane, the entire area to be more definitely defined by supplemental agreement between the United Nations and the United States of America.
“Annex 2—Maintenance of Utilities and Underground Construction

section 1

The Secretary-General agrees to provide passes to duly authorized employees of The City of New York, the State of New York, or any of their agencies or subdivisions, for the purpose of enabling them to inspect, repair, maintain, reconstruct and relocate utilities, conduits, mains and sewers within the headquarters district.
section 2

Underground constructions may be undertaken by The City of New York, or the State of New York, or any of their agencies or subdivisions, within the headquarters district only after consultation with the Secretary-General, and under conditions which shall not disturb the carrying out of the functions of the United Nations.
Sec. 2. For the purpose of carrying out the obligations of the United States under said agreement and supplemental agreements with respect to United States assurances that the United Nations shall not be dispossessed of its property in the headquarters district, and with respect to the establishment of radio facilities and the possible establishment of an airport:
(a) The President of the United States, or any official or governmental agency authorized by the President, may acquire in the name of the United States any property or interest therein by purchase, donation, or other means of transfer, or may cause proceedings to be instituted for the acquisition of the same by condemnation.
(b) Upon the request of the President, or such officer as the President may designate, the Attorney General of the United States shall cause such condemnation or other proceedings to be instituted in the name of the United States in the district court of the United States for the district in which the property is situated and such court shall have full jurisdiction of such proceedings, and any condemnation proceedings shall be conducted in accordance with the Act of August 1, 1888 (25 Stat. 357), as amended [now 40 U.S.C. 3113] and the Act of February 26, 1931 (46 Stat. 1421), as amended [now 40 U.S.C. 3114–3116, 3118].
(c) After the institution of any such condemnation proceedings, possession of the property may be taken at any time the President, or such officer as he may designate, determines is necessary, and the court shall enter such orders as may be necessary to effect entry and occupancy of the property.
(d) The President of the United States, or any officer or governmental agency duly authorized by the President, may, in the name of the United States, transfer or convey possession of and title to any interest in any property acquired or held by the United States, pursuant to paragraph (a) above, to the United Nations on the terms provided in the agreement or in any supplemental agreement, and shall execute and deliver such conveyances and other instruments and perform such other acts in connection therewith as may be necessary to carry out the provisions of the agreement.
(e) There are authorized to be appropriated, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, such sums as may be required to enable the United States to carry out the undertakings hereby authorized: Provided, That any money appropriated under this authorization shall be spent only on a basis of reimbursement by the United Nations in accordance with section 3 of the agreement, and that the money thus reimbursed shall be deposited and covered into the Treasury of the United States as miscellaneous receipts.
Sec. 3. The President, or the Secretary of State under his direction, is authorized to enter into agreements with the State of New York or any other State of the United States and to the extent not inconsistent with State law, with any one or more of the political subdivisions thereof in aid of effectuating the provisions of the agreement.
Sec. 4. Any States, or, to the extent not inconsistent with State law any political subdivisions thereof, affected by the establishment of the headquarters of the United Nations in the United States are authorized to enter into agreements with the United Nations or with each other consistent with the agreement and for the purpose of facilitating compliance with the same: Provided, That, except in cases of emergency and agreements of a routine contractual character, a representative of the United States, to be appointed by the Secretary of State, may, at the discretion of the Secretary of State, participate in the negotiations, and that any such agreement entered into by such State or States or political subdivisions thereof shall be subject to approval by the Secretary of State.
Sec. 5. The President is authorized to make effective with respect to the temporary headquarters of the United Nations in the State of New York, on a provisional basis, such of the provisions of the agreement as he may deem appropriate, having due regard for the needs of the United Nations at its temporary headquarters.
Sec. 6. Nothing in the agreement shall be construed as in any way diminishing, abridging, or weakening the right of the United States to safeguard its own security and completely to control the entrance of aliens into any territory of the United States other than the headquarters district and its immediate vicinity, as to be defined and fixed in a supplementary agreement between the Government of the United States and the United Nations in pursuance of section 13(3)(e) of the agreement, and such areas as it is reasonably necessary to traverse in transit between the same and foreign countries. Moreover, nothing in section 14 of the agreement with respect to facilitating entrance into the United States by persons who wish to visit the headquarters district and do not enjoy the right of entry provided in section 11 of the agreement shall be construed to amend or suspend in any way the immigration laws of the United States or to commit the United States in any way to effect any amendment or suspension of such laws.”
UN Membership for Communist China

Pub. L. 91–472, title I, § 105,Oct. 21, 1970, 84 Stat. 1044, provided that it was the sense of the Congress that the United Nations should not admit the Communist Chinese Government to membership as the representative of China. Similar provisions were contained in the following prior acts:
Dec. 24, 1969, Pub. L. 91–153, title I, § 105, 83 Stat. 407.
Aug. 9, 1968, Pub. L. 90–470, title I, § 105, 82 Stat. 672.
Nov. 8, 1967, Pub. L. 90–133, title I, § 105, 81 Stat. 416.
Nov. 8, 1966, Pub. L. 89–797, title I, § 105, 80 Stat. 1484.
Sept. 2, 1965, Pub. L. 89–164, title I, § 105, 79 Stat. 625.
Aug. 31, 1964, Pub. L. 88–527, title I, § 105, 78 Stat. 716.
Dec. 30, 1963, Pub. L. 88–245, title I, § 105, 77 Stat. 781.
Oct. 18, 1962, Pub. L. 87–843, title I, § 105, 76 Stat. 1085.
Sept. 21, 1961, Pub. L. 87–264, title I, § 105, 75 Stat. 550.
Aug. 31, 1960, Pub. L. 86–678, title I, § 105, 74 Stat. 561.
July 13, 1959, Pub. L. 86–84, title I, § 105, 73 Stat. 186.
June 30, 1958, Pub. L. 85–474, title I, § 105, 72 Stat. 249.
June 11, 1957, Pub. L. 85–49, title I, § 105, 71 Stat. 60.
June 20, 1956, ch. 414, title I, § 110,70 Stat. 304.
July 7, 1955, ch. 279, title I, § 110,69 Stat. 270.
July 2, 1954, ch. 456, title I, § 110,68 Stat. 418.
Aug. 5, 1953, ch. 328, title I, § 111,67 Stat. 372.
Trusteeship Agreement Relating to Territory of the Pacific Islands

Act of July 18, 1947, ch. 271, 61 Stat. 397, authorized the President to approve the trusteeship agreement between the United States and the Security Council of the United Nations for the Territory of the Pacific Islands.
Ex. Ord. No. 10108. Designation of U.S. Mission to United Nations

Ex. Ord. No. 10108, Feb. 9, 1950, 15 F.R. 757, provided:
By virtue of the authority vested in me by the United Nations Participation Act of 1945 (59 Stat. 619) [this subchapter], as amended by the act of October 10, 1949, 63 Stat. 734, and as President of the United States, it is hereby ordered as follows:
1. The Representative of the United States to the United Nations, the Deputy Representative of the United States to the United Nations, the Deputy Representative of the United States to the Security Council of the United Nations, representatives of the United States in the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations and its Commissions, representatives of the United States in the Trusteeship Council, the Atomic Energy Commission, the Commission for Conventional Armaments, and the Military Staff Committee of the United Nations, and representatives to organs and agencies of the United Nations appointed or designated and included within the United States Mission to the United Nations as herein designated, together with their deputies, staffs, and offices—shall constitute and be known as the United States Mission to the United Nations.
2. The Representative of the United States to the United Nations shall be the Chief of Mission in charge of the United States Mission to the United Nations. The Chief of Mission shall coordinate at the seat of the United Nations the activities of the Mission in carrying out the instructions of the President transmitted either by the Secretary of State or by other means of transmission as directed by the President. Instructions to the representatives of the United States Joint Chiefs of Staff in the Military Staff Committee of the United Nations shall be transmitted by the Joint Chiefs of Staff. On request of the Chief of Mission, such representatives shall, in addition to their responsibilities under the Charter of the United Nations, serve as advisers in the United States Mission to the United Nations.
3. The Chief of Mission shall be responsible for the administration of the Mission, including personnel, budget, obligation and expenditure of funds, and the central administrative services; provided that he shall not be responsible for the internal administration of the personnel, budget, and obligation and expenditure of funds of the representatives of the United States Joint Chiefs of Staff in the Military Staff Committee of the United Nations. The Chief of Mission shall discharge his responsibilities under this paragraph in accordance with such rules and regulations as the Secretary of State may from time to time prescribe.
4. The Deputy Representative of the United States to the United Nations shall be the Deputy Chief of Mission, who shall act as Chief of Mission in the absence of the Representative of the United States to the United Nations.
5. This order supersedes Executive Order No. 9844 of April 28, 1947, entitled “Designating the United States Mission to the United Nations and Providing for Its Direction and Administration.”
Ex. Ord. No. 10422. Loyalty Procedures for Employees

Ex. Ord. No. 10422, Jan. 9, 1953, 18 F.R. 239, as amended by Ex. Ord. No. 10459, June 2, 1953, 18 F.R. 3183; Ex. Ord. No. 10763, Apr. 23, 1958, eff. July 1, 1958, 23 F.R. 2767; Ex. Ord. No. 11890, Dec. 10, 1975, 40 F.R. 57775; Ex. Ord. No. 12107, Dec. 28, 1978, 44 F.R. 1055, provided:
part i—investigation of united states citizens employed or being considered for employment on the secretariat of the united nations

1. Whenever the Secretary of State receives, from the Secretary General of the United Nations, the name of and other necessary identifying data concerning each United States citizen employed or being considered for employment by the United Nations, the Secretary of State shall, consistent with the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a) and other applicable law, cause an investigation to be conducted as provided in paragraph 2 of this Part, or forward the information received from the Secretary General to the Office of Personnel Management, which shall conduct an investigation, consistent with the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a) and other applicable law, as provided in paragraphs 3 and 4 of this Part.
2. With respect to all applicants for short term appointments which will not exceed six months and which are not appointments to United Nations Secretariat professional posts or posts subject to geographical distribution, the Secretary of State shall cause an investigation to be conducted, which investigation shall be limited to a search of the files of the Department of State. If the investigation reveals any derogatory information within the meaning of the standard set forth in Part II of this order, the information received from the Secretary General of the United Nations shall be forwarded to the Office of Personnel Management, which shall conduct an investigation.
3. (a) Whenever the Office of Personnel Management receives the information forwarded by the Secretary General to the Secretary of State, the Office of Personnel Management shall conduct a National Agency Check. Each National Agency Check shall include reference to the following: (1) Federal Bureau of Investigation files; (2) Office of Personnel Management files; (3) Military Intelligence files as appropriate; and (4) files of any other appropriate Government investigative or intelligence agency.
(b) If the investigation conducted by the Office of Personnel Management reveals that a favorable National Agency Check was previously completed, and the investigation conducted by the Office of Personnel Management has not disclosed any derogatory information within the meaning of the standard set forth in Part II of this order, completion of a new National Agency Check is not required if: (1) the applicant is or was previously employed by the same or another international organization without an immediately prior break in such service exceeding one year; (2) the applicant is or was a United States Government civilian or military employee, or a United States Government contract employee, without an immediately prior break in such employment exceeding one year; or (3) the applicant is transferred or detailed from an agency of the United States Government pursuant to the provisions of sections 3343, 3581, 3582, 3583, or 3584 of Title 5 of the United States Code.
4. Whenever information disclosed with respect to any person being investigated is derogatory, within the standard set forth in Part II of this order, the Office of Personnel Management shall forward such information to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the Bureau shall conduct a full field investigation of such persons.
5. Reports of full field investigations shall be forwarded through the Office of Personnel Management to the International Organizations Employees Loyalty Board, established by Part IV of this order and hereinafter referred to as the Board. Whenever such a report contains derogatory information, under the standard set forth in Part II of this order, there shall be made available to the person in question the procedures of the Board provided or authorized by Part IV of this order (including the opportunity of a hearing) for inquiring into the loyalty of the person as a United States citizen in accordance with the standard set forth in Part II of this order. The Board shall transmit its determinations, as advisory opinions, together with the reasons therefor stated in as much detail as the Board determines that security considerations permit, to the Secretary of State for transmission to the Secretary General of the United Nations for his use in exercising his rights and duties with respect to the personnel of the United Nations as set out in the Charter and in regulations and decisions of the competent organs of the United Nations.
6. At any stage during the investigation or Board proceeding, the Board may transmit to the Secretary of State, for forwarding to the Secretary General, in as much detail as the Board determines that security considerations permit, the derogatory information disclosed by investigation. This shall be for the purpose of assisting the Secretary General in determining whether or not he should take action with respect to the employee, or the person being considered for employment, prior to the completion of the procedures outlined in this order. The making available of any such information shall be without prejudice to the right of full hearing as provided for herein.
7. The Secretary of State shall notify the Secretary General in all cases in which no derogatory information has been developed.
part ii—standard

1. The standard to be used by the Board in making an advisory determination as provided for in paragraph 5 of Part I of this order with respect to a United States citizen who is an employee of, or is being considered for employment by, the United Nations, shall be whether or not on all the evidence there is a reasonable doubt as to the loyalty of the person involved to the Government of the United States.
2. Activities and associations of a United States citizen who is an employee or being considered for employment by the United Nations which may be considered in connection with the determination whether or not on all the evidence there is a reasonable doubt as to the loyalty of the person involved to the Government of the United States may include one or more of the following:
(a) Sabotage, espionage, or attempts or preparations therefor, or knowingly associating with spies or saboteurs.
(b) Treason or sedition or advocacy thereof.
(c) Advocacy of revolution or force or violence to alter the constitutional form of government of the United States.
(d) Intentional, unauthorized disclosure to any person, under circumstances which may indicate disloyalty to the United States, of United States documents or United States information of a confidential or non-public character obtained by the person making the disclosure as a result of his previous employment by the Government of the United States or otherwise.
(e) Performing or attempting to perform his duties, or otherwise acting, while an employee of the United States Government during a previous period, so as to serve the interests of another government in preference to the interests of the United States.
(f) Knowing membership with the specific intent of furthering the aims of, or adherence to and active participation in, any foreign or domestic organization, association, movement, group or combination of persons, which unlawfully advocates or practices the commission of acts of force or violence to prevent others from exercising their rights under the Constitution or laws of the United States, or of any State, or which seeks to overthrow the Government of the United States or any State or subdivision thereof by unlawful means.
part iii—other international organizations

The provisions of Parts I and II of this order shall be applicable to United States citizens who are employees of, or are being considered for employment by, other public international organizations of which the United States Government is a member, by arrangement between the executive head of the international organization concerned and the Secretary of State or other officer of the United States designated by the President.
part iv—international organizations employees loyalty board

1. There is hereby established in the Office of Personnel Management an International Organizations Employees Loyalty Board of not less than three impartial persons, the members of which shall be officers or employees of the Office.
2. The Board shall have authority in cases referred to it under this order to inquire into the loyalty to the Government of the United States of United States citizens employed, or considered for employment, by international organizations of which the United States is a member, and to make advisory determinations in such cases, under the standard set forth in Part II of this order, for transmission by the Secretary of State to the executive heads of the international organizations coming under the arrangements made pursuant to Parts I and III of this order.
3. The Board shall make necessary rules and regulations, not inconsistent with the provisions of this order, for the execution of its functions. There shall be included in such rules and regulations provisions for furnishing each person whose case is considered by the Board:
(a) A written statement of the alleged derogatory information, in as much detail as security considerations permit.
(b) An opportunity to answer or comment upon the statement of alleged derogatory information, in writing, and to submit affidavits.
(c) An opportunity for hearing before the Board, or a panel thereof of at least three members, including the right of the person to be represented by counsel, to present witnesses and other evidence in his behalf, and to cross-examine witnesses offered in support of the derogatory information: Provided, That the Board shall conduct its hearings in such manner as to protect from disclosure information affecting the national security.
4. Based upon all the evidence before it, including such confidential information as it may have in its possession, the Board shall make its determinations in writing, and shall send to each person who is the subject thereof a copy. In cases in which hearing or other action is by a panel of three members, the action or determination of the panel shall constitute the action or determination of the Board, except that rules and regulations pursuant to paragraph 3 of this Part shall be adopted by action of the Board as a whole.
5. Except as otherwise specified in this order, the Office of Personnel Management shall provide the necessary investigative and other services required by the Board. All agencies of the executive branch of the Government are authorized and directed to cooperate with the Board, and, to the extent permitted by law, to furnish the Board such information and assistance as it may require in the performance of its functions.
6. All cases arising under this order which are pending before the Regional Loyalty Boards and the Loyalty Review Board of the Commission on the effective date of Executive Order No. 10450 of April 27, 1953, shall on that date be transferred to the Board.
Delegation of Authority on Rates of Compensation for U.S. Representatives to the United Nations

Memorandum of President of the United States, Apr. 1, 1997, 62 F.R. 18261, provided:
Memorandum for the Secretary of State
By virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United States of America, including section 301 of title 3 of the United States Code, I hereby delegate to the Secretary of State the functions vested in the President by section 2(g) of the United Nations Participation Act of 1945 (Public Law 79–264, 22 U.S.C. 287 (g)).
You are authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the Federal Register.
William J. Clinton.

 

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